01002nkm a2200313Ia 4500001000700000003000800007005001700015006001900032007001500051007000700066008004100073040002100114050001700135082001900152245014600171260003400317300002300351500005400374500003100428500003300459538003600492650001400528650003000542650003100572650002400603650002200627650002900649975001000678ERGARHUtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFirst bicycle race for women in France took place in a park in Bordeaux, 1 November 1868, with only four participantsh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Lebrecht Music and Arts Photo Library. aSource: Alamy Stock Photo. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature. aImage01084nkm a2200313Ia 4500001000700000003000800007005001700015006001900032007001500051007000700066008004100073040002100114050001700135082001900152245023200171260003400403300002300437500005000460500003100510500003300541538003600574650001400610650003000624650003100654650002400685650002200709650002900731975001000760FFB84XUtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSuffrageh[electronic resource] :bWoodhull Sisters. Victoria Claflin Woodhull and her sister, Tennessee Claflin, unsuccessfully attempting to vote in New York City on election day, 1871. Line engraving, American, 19th century. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Granger Historical Picture Archve. aSource: Alamy Stock Photo. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature. aImage02465nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450092002152600034003073000023003415000033003645201341003975380036017386500014017746500030017886500031018186500024018496500022018736500029018957000033019247000035019578560114019929750009021069780415578387UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804155783878 a10.4324/9780415578387 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aThe 'Civilizing' Missionh[electronic resource] :bEducation, Morality, and Conversion. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe History of Feminism series makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of women's and gender studies, women's history, and women's writing, as well as those working in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by expert editors, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. Building on the success of Women and Empire (2009), this new title in the series brings together in four volumes a unique range of nineteenth-century texts on children and empire. Making readily available materials which are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and use, Children and Empire is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. Each volume is also supplemented by substantial introductions, newly written by the editors, which contextualize the material. And with a detailed appendix providing data on the books, newspapers, and periodicals in which the gathered materials were originally published, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aCassidy, Cheryl M.,eeditor.1 aTange, Andrea Kaston,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/children-and-empire/volumes/the-civilizing-mission aBook02484nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450098002152600034003133000023003475000033003705201341004035380036017446500014017806500030017946500031018246500024018556500022018796500029019017000035019307000033019658560127019989750009021259780415578400UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804155784008 a10.4324/9780415578400 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aMigrations and Cultural Differencesh[electronic resource] :bChildren throughout the Empire. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe History of Feminism series makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of women's and gender studies, women's history, and women's writing, as well as those working in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by expert editors, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. Building on the success of Women and Empire (2009), this new title in the series brings together in four volumes a unique range of nineteenth-century texts on children and empire. Making readily available materials which are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and use, Children and Empire is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. Each volume is also supplemented by substantial introductions, newly written by the editors, which contextualize the material. And with a detailed appendix providing data on the books, newspapers, and periodicals in which the gathered materials were originally published, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aTange, Andrea Kaston,eeditor.1 aCassidy, Cheryl M.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/children-and-empire/volumes/migrations-and-cultural-differences aBook01781nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450066002152600034002813000023003155000033003385200659003715380036010306500014010666500030010806500031011106500024011416500022011656500029011877000031012167000026012478560149012739750009014229780415564427UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804155644278 a10.4324/9780415564427 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aVictorian and Edwardian Anti-Feminismh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis new collection from Routledge and Edition Synapse provides the documentary backdrop to this growing critical interest in anti-feminism. Based on the premise that to understand the social and intellectual context of the women's movement and feminism, it is crucial that all contributions to the debate be explored, and not just those of the 'winning side', the collection meets an urgent need to restore to the historical record a sense of how feminism was a deeply marginalized position, and to remember that anti-feminism in many cases better represents public opinion concerning the gender politics of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aSanders, Valerie,eeditor.1 aDelap, Lucy,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/victorian-and-edwardian-anti-feminism/volumes/victorian-and-edwardian-anti-feminism-2 aBook01733nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450066002152600034002813000023003155000033003385200659003715380036010306500014010666500030010806500031011106500024011416500022011656500029011877000031012167000026012478560101012739750009013749780415498173UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154981738 a10.4324/9780415498173 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aVictorian and Edwardian Anti-Feminismh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis new collection from Routledge and Edition Synapse provides the documentary backdrop to this growing critical interest in anti-feminism. Based on the premise that to understand the social and intellectual context of the women's movement and feminism, it is crucial that all contributions to the debate be explored, and not just those of the 'winning side', the collection meets an urgent need to restore to the historical record a sense of how feminism was a deeply marginalized position, and to remember that anti-feminism in many cases better represents public opinion concerning the gender politics of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aSanders, Valerie,eeditor.1 aDelap, Lucy,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/victorian-and-edwardian-anti-feminism aBook01781nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450066002152600034002813000023003155000033003385200659003715380036010306500014010666500030010806500031011106500024011416500022011656500029011877000031012167000026012478560149012739750009014229780415498210UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154982108 a10.4324/9780415498210 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aVictorian and Edwardian Anti-Feminismh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis new collection from Routledge and Edition Synapse provides the documentary backdrop to this growing critical interest in anti-feminism. Based on the premise that to understand the social and intellectual context of the women's movement and feminism, it is crucial that all contributions to the debate be explored, and not just those of the 'winning side', the collection meets an urgent need to restore to the historical record a sense of how feminism was a deeply marginalized position, and to remember that anti-feminism in many cases better represents public opinion concerning the gender politics of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aSanders, Valerie,eeditor.1 aDelap, Lucy,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/victorian-and-edwardian-anti-feminism/volumes/victorian-and-edwardian-anti-feminism-1 aBook01781nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450066002152600034002813000023003155000033003385200659003715380036010306500014010666500030010806500031011106500024011416500022011656500029011877000031012167000026012478560149012739750009014229780415498203UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154982038 a10.4324/9780415498203 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aVictorian and Edwardian Anti-Feminismh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis new collection from Routledge and Edition Synapse provides the documentary backdrop to this growing critical interest in anti-feminism. Based on the premise that to understand the social and intellectual context of the women's movement and feminism, it is crucial that all contributions to the debate be explored, and not just those of the 'winning side', the collection meets an urgent need to restore to the historical record a sense of how feminism was a deeply marginalized position, and to remember that anti-feminism in many cases better represents public opinion concerning the gender politics of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aSanders, Valerie,eeditor.1 aDelap, Lucy,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/victorian-and-edwardian-anti-feminism/volumes/victorian-and-edwardian-anti-feminism-3 aBook01779nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450066002152600034002813000023003155000033003385200659003715380036010306500014010666500030010806500031011106500024011416500022011656500029011877000031012167000026012478560147012739750009014209780415498197UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154981978 a10.4324/9780415498197 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aVictorian and Edwardian Anti-Feminismh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis new collection from Routledge and Edition Synapse provides the documentary backdrop to this growing critical interest in anti-feminism. Based on the premise that to understand the social and intellectual context of the women's movement and feminism, it is crucial that all contributions to the debate be explored, and not just those of the 'winning side', the collection meets an urgent need to restore to the historical record a sense of how feminism was a deeply marginalized position, and to remember that anti-feminism in many cases better represents public opinion concerning the gender politics of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aSanders, Valerie,eeditor.1 aDelap, Lucy,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/victorian-and-edwardian-anti-feminism/volumes/victorian-and-edwardian-anti-feminism aBook02390nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450048002152600034002633000023002975000033003205201341003535380036016946500014017306500030017446500031017746500024018056500022018296500029018517000033018807000035019138560083019489750009020319780415578370UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804155783708 a10.4324/9780415578370 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aChildren and Empireh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe History of Feminism series makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of women's and gender studies, women's history, and women's writing, as well as those working in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by expert editors, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. Building on the success of Women and Empire (2009), this new title in the series brings together in four volumes a unique range of nineteenth-century texts on children and empire. Making readily available materials which are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and use, Children and Empire is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. Each volume is also supplemented by substantial introductions, newly written by the editors, which contextualize the material. And with a detailed appendix providing data on the books, newspapers, and periodicals in which the gathered materials were originally published, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aCassidy, Cheryl M.,eeditor.1 aTange, Andrea Kaston,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/children-and-empire aBook02473nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450098002152600034003133000023003475000033003705201341004035380036017446500014017806500030017946500031018246500024018556500022018796500029019017000035019307000033019658560116019989750009021149780415578417UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804155784178 a10.4324/9780415578417 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aEmpire's Children at Homeh[electronic resource] :bThe Domestic Impact of a Presence Abroad. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe History of Feminism series makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of women's and gender studies, women's history, and women's writing, as well as those working in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by expert editors, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. Building on the success of Women and Empire (2009), this new title in the series brings together in four volumes a unique range of nineteenth-century texts on children and empire. Making readily available materials which are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and use, Children and Empire is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. Each volume is also supplemented by substantial introductions, newly written by the editors, which contextualize the material. And with a detailed appendix providing data on the books, newspapers, and periodicals in which the gathered materials were originally published, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aTange, Andrea Kaston,eeditor.1 aCassidy, Cheryl M.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/children-and-empire/volumes/empires-children-at-home aBook02460nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450086002152600034003013000023003355000033003585201341003915380036017326500014017686500030017826500031018126500024018436500022018676500029018897000033019187000035019518560115019869750009021019780415578394UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804155783948 a10.4324/9780415578394 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aManagement and Childrenh[electronic resource] :bLife in Sickness and in Health. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe History of Feminism series makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of women's and gender studies, women's history, and women's writing, as well as those working in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by expert editors, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. Building on the success of Women and Empire (2009), this new title in the series brings together in four volumes a unique range of nineteenth-century texts on children and empire. Making readily available materials which are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and use, Children and Empire is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. Each volume is also supplemented by substantial introductions, newly written by the editors, which contextualize the material. And with a detailed appendix providing data on the books, newspapers, and periodicals in which the gathered materials were originally published, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aCassidy, Cheryl M.,eeditor.1 aTange, Andrea Kaston,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/children-and-empire/volumes/management-and-children aBook01963nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450095002152600034003103000023003445000033003675200781004005380036011816500014012176500030012316500031012616500024012926500022013166500029013387000026013677000030013937000030014238560139014539750009015929781138764507UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387645078 a10.4324/9781138764507 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aMary, a Fiction the Wrongs of Womanh[electronic resource] :bOr, Maria the Cave of Fancy. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis seven-volume collection brings together the known works of Mary Wollstonecraft, the eighteenth-century philosopher, writer and women's rights advocate. Condemned by her contemporaries for her unconventional lifestyle, Wollstonecraft was later recognised as a founding figure of the feminist movement. She was also an acute observer of the political upheavals of the French revolution and advocated educational reform. Wollstonecraft's writings, which include A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and Thoughts on the Education of Daughters, are recognised as cornerstone texts in the development of feminist thought. This book is therefore a vital reference to the student of feminist history, and will also be of value to any reader interested in the origins of feminism. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aTodd, Janet,eeditor.1 aButler, Marilyn,eeditor.1 aRees-Mogg, Emma,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-works-of-mary-wollstonecraft/volumes/mary-a-fiction-the-wrongs-of-woman aBook02115nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000032002152450114002472600034003613000023003955000033004185201045004515380036014966500014015326500030015466500031015766500024016076500022016316500029016538560086016829750009017689780203360323UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802033603238 a10.4324/9780203360323 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aBeetham, Margaret,eauthor.10aA Magazine of her Own?h[electronic resource] :bDomesticity and desire in the woman's magazine, 1800 - 1914. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aLike the corset, the women's magazines which emerged in the nineteenth century produced a 'natural' idea of femininity: the domestic wife; the fashionable woman; the romancing and desirable girl. Their legacy, from agony aunts to fashion plates, are easily traced in their modern counterparts. But do these magazines and their promises empower or disempower their readers? A Magazine of Her Own? is a lively and revealing exploration of this immensely popular form from its beginnings. In fascinating detail Margaret Beetham investigates the desires, images and interpretations of femininity posed by a medium whose readership was and still is almost exclusively female. A Magazine of Her Own? is at once a chronological tracing of the history, a collection of intriguing case studies and an intervention into recent debates about gender and sexuality in popular reading. It is a book which anyone who is interested in the unique, influential world of the woman's magazine - students, scholars and general readers alike - will want to read. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/a-magazine-of-her-own aBook01721nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450083002152600034002983000023003325000033003555200688003885380036010766500014011126500030011266500031011566500024011876500022012116500029012337000030012628560082012929750009013749780203402412UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802034024128 a10.4324/9780203402412 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aA Widening Sphereh[electronic resource] :bChanging Roles of Victorian Women. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFirst published in 1977, this book is a companion volume to Suffer and Be Still. It looks at the widening sphere of women's activities in the Victorian age and testifies to the dual nature of the legal and social constraints of the period: on the one hand, the ideal of the perfect lady and the restrictive laws governing marriage and property posed limits to women's independence; on the other hand, some Victorian women chose to live lives of great variety and complexity. By uncovering new data and reinterpreting old, the contributors in this volume debunk some of the myths surrounding the Victorian woman and alter stereotypes on which many of today's social customs are based. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aVicinus, Martha,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/a-widening-sphere aBook01383nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000033002152450117002482600034003653000023003995000033004225200251004555380036007066500014007426500030007566500031007866500024008176500022008416500029008638560144008929750009010369781315655802UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813156558028 a10.4324/9781315655802 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aDelyfer, Catherine,eauthor.10aArt and Womanhood in Fin-De-Si©·cle Writingh[electronic resource] :bThe Fiction of Lucas Malet, 1880 - 1931. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aLucas Malet is one of a number of forgotten female writers whose work bridges the gap between George Eliot and Virginia Woolf. Malet's writing was intrinsically linked to her passion for art. This is the first book-length study of Malet's novels. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/art-and-womanhood-in-fin-de-siecle-writing-the-fiction-of-lucas-malet-1880-1931 aBook02461nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450082002152600034002973000023003315000033003545201363003875380036017506500014017866500030018006500031018306500024018616500022018856500029019077000040019367000037019768560089020139750009021029780203094112UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802030941128 a10.4324/9780203094112 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aAt the Boundaries of Lawh[electronic resource] :bFeminism and Legal Theory. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFeminists have recently begun to challenge the powerful influence of the law on the social and cultural construction of women's roles, identities, and rights. At the Boundaries of Law is a timely and path-breaking work that provides a series of non-technical, interdisciplinary explorations into the nature and effects of legal regulation on women's lives. Together the essays examine the fertile - and radically revisionary - links between feminism and legal theory. But At the Boundaries of Law rejects the abstract 'grand theorizing' of traditional feminist legal theory, focusing instead on the concrete and material implications of the legal injustices endured by women. These essays emphasise the complex diversity of female experience, collectively arguing for legal theory and practice that both recognises and accommodates the concept of 'difference' - in gender, class, race and sexual orientation. At the Boundaries of Law also raises provocative questions about the methodology and future of feminist legal theory itself. In its rich variety of issues and approaches, this volume will command the interest not only of legal theorists, but of those interested in women's studies, philosophy, politics, sociology and history. It is sure to set the future agenda for scholars, policymakers and anyone concerned with the role of law in society. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aFineman, Martha Albertson,eeditor.1 aThomadsen, Nancy Sweet,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/at-the-boundaries-of-law aBook01397nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450085002152600034003003000023003345000033003575200320003905380036007106500014007466500030007606500031007906500024008216500022008456500029008677000033008968560121009299750009010509781315012957UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813150129578 a10.4324/9781315012957 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aBarbara Leigh Smith Bodichon and the Langham Place Grouph[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFirst published in 1987. Reprints material from the 1850's and 1860's, a period which marked a turning point in the history of British Feminism. At the centre of this was Barbara Leigh Smith Bodichon, whose pioneering schemes to improve the status of women made these years some of the richest in debate and reform. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aLacey, Candida Ann,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/barbara-leigh-smith-bodichon-and-the-langham-place-group aBook01377nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450110002152600034003253000023003595000033003825200315004155380036007306500014007666500030007806500031008106500024008416500022008656500029008877000026009168560088009429750009010309781315012964UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813150129648 a10.4324/9781315012964 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aBefore the Vote was Wonh[electronic resource] :bArguments For and Against Women's Suffrage 1864 - 1896. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFirst published in 1987. This volume traces the arguments of early suffragists through the last three decades of the nineteenth century. Includes the texts of the House of Commons Debate on the 1871 Disabilities Bill, 1982 Women's Franchise Bill and key documents by those who were opposed to women's suffrage. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aLewis, Jane,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/before-the-vote-was-won aBook02581nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450081002152600034002963000023003305000033003535201550003865380036019366500014019726500030019866500031020166500024020476500022020716500029020937000030021228560082021529750009022349781315569581UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813155695818 a10.4324/9781315569581 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aBluestockings Now!h[electronic resource] :bThe Evolution of a Social Role. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aBringing together top specialists in the field, this edited volume challenges the theory that the eighteenth-century British intellectual women known as the Bluestockings were an isolated phenomenon spanning the period from the 1750s through the 1790s. On the contrary, the contributors suggest, the Bluestockings can be conceptualized as belonging to a chain of interconnected networks, taking their origin at a threshold moment in print media and communications development and extending into the present. The collection begins with a definition of the Bluestockings as a social role rather than a fixed group, a movement rather than a static phenomenon, an evolving dynamic reaching into our late-modern era. Essays include a rare transcript of a Bluestocking conversation; new, previously unknown Bluestockings brought to light for the first time; and descriptions of Bluestocking activity in the realms of natural history, arts and crafts, theatre, industry, travel, and international connections. The concluding essay argues that the Blues reimagined and practiced women's work in ways that adapted to and altered the course of modernity, decisively putting a female imprint on economic, social, and cultural modernization. Demonstrating how the role of the Bluestocking has evolved through different historical configurations yet has structurally remained the same, the collection traces the influence of the Blues on the Romantic Period through the nineteenth century and proposes the reinvention of Bluestocking practice in the present. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHeller, Deborah,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/bluestockings-now aBook01837nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450096002152600034003113000023003455000033003685200798004015380036011996500014012356500030012496500031012796500024013106500022013346500029013567000029013858560076014149750009014909780203610497UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802036104978 a10.4324/9780203610497 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aBorderlinesh[electronic resource] :bGenders and Identities in War and Peace, 1870 - 1930. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aBorderlines weaves together the study of gender with that of the evolution of nationalism and colonialism. Its broad, comparative perspective will rechart the war experiences and identities of women and men during this period of transformation from peace to war, and again to peace. Drawing on a wide range of materials, from government policy and propaganda to subversive trench journalism and performance, from fiction, drama and film to the record of activists in various movements and in various countries, Borderlines weaves together the study of gender with that of the evolution of nationalism and colonialism. Its broad, comparative perspective will rechart the war experiences and identities of women and men during this period of transformation from peace to war, and again to peace. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMelman, Billie,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/borderlines aBook01720nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000034002152450089002492600034003383000023003725000033003955200637004285380036010656500014011016500030011156500031011456500024011766500022012006500029012228560122012519750009013739781315300870UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813153008708 a10.4324/9781315300870 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aJames, Janet Wilson,eauthor.10aChanging Ideas About Women in the United States, 1776 - 1825h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aWritten in 1954 and published in 1981, this fascinating study remains authoritative as an account of a body of opinion about women's nature and role that was in vogue in America during the first half-century after independence. Combining intellectual and social history, this work was one of numerous attempts being made at the time to add depth to American social history dealing with women and women's experiences before feminism. The author explores British sources of American thought as well, presenting an early comparative history, and offers a focus on religion to show how processes of change to ideas about women occurred. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/changing-ideas-about-women-in-the-united-states-1776-1825 aBook02464nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000031002152450092002462600034003383000023003725000033003955201378004285380036018066500014018426500030018566500031018866500024019176500022019416500029019638560125019929750009021179781315573618UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813155736188 a10.4324/9781315573618 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aMoruzi, Kristine,eauthor.10aConstructing Girlhood through the Periodical Press, 1850 - 1915h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFocusing on six popular British girls' periodicals, Kristine Moruzi explores the debate about the shifting nature of Victorian girlhood between 1850 and 1915. During an era of significant political, social, and economic change, girls' periodicals demonstrate the difficulties of fashioning a coherent, consistent model of girlhood. The mixed-genre format of these magazines, Moruzi suggests, allowed inconsistencies and tensions between competing feminine ideals to exist within the same publication. Adopting a case study approach, Moruzi shows that the Monthly Packet, the Girl of the Period Miscellany, the Girl's Own Paper, Atalanta, the Young Woman, and the Girl's Realm each attempted to define and refine a unique type of girl, particularly the religious girl, the 'Girl of the Period,' the healthy girl, the educated girl, the marrying girl, and the modern girl. These periodicals reflected the challenges of embracing the changing conditions of girls' lives while also attempting to maintain traditional feminine ideals of purity and morality. By analyzing the competing discourses within girls' periodicals, Moruzi's book demonstrates how they were able to frame feminine behaviour in ways that both reinforced and redefined the changing role of girls in nineteenth-century society while also allowing girl readers the opportunity to respond to these definitions. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/constructing-girlhood-through-the-periodical-press-1850-1915 aBook02367nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000034002152450101002492600034003503000023003845000033004075201304004405380036017446500014017806500030017946500031018246500024018556500022018796500029019018560090019309750009020209780203191910UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031919108 a10.4324/9780203191910 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aHammerton, A. James,eauthor.10aCruelty and Companionshiph[electronic resource] :bConflict in nineteenth-century married life. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aCruelty and Companionship is an account of the intimate but darker side of marriage in Victorian and Edwardian England. Hammerton draws upon previously unpublished material from the records of the divorce court and magistrates' courts to challenge many popular views about family patterns. His findings open a rare window on the sexual politics of everyday life and the routine tensions which conditioned marriage in middle- and working-class families. Using contemporary evidence ranging from prescriptive texts and public debate to autobiography and fiction, Hammerton examines the intense public scrutiny which accompanied the routine exposure of marital breakdown, and charts a growing critique of men's behaviour in marriage which increasingly demanded regulation and reform. The resulting critical discourse, ranging from paternalist to feminist, casts new light on the origins and trajectory of nineteenth-century feminism, legal change, and our understanding of the changing expression of masculinity. Cruelty and Companionship will appeal to students and teachers of nineteenth- and twentieth-century social history and gender studies. It should also interest students of family sociology and social work, and general readers interested in family relationships, domestic violence and women. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/cruelty-and-companionship aBook02583nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000043002152450143002582600034004013000023004355000033004585201432004915380036019236500014019596500030019736500031020036500024020346500022020586500029020808560127021099750009022369780203809341UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802038093418 a10.4324/9780203809341 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aHellman, Caroline Chamberlin,eauthor.10aDomesticity and Design in American Women's Lives and Literatureh[electronic resource] :bStowe, Alcott, Cather, and Wharton Writing Home. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aDomesticity and Design in American Women's Lives and Literature explores the ways in which four American women writers from the mid-nineteenth to the early-twentieth century inhabited domestic space and portrayed it in their work. Hellman explores independent female authors who had intriguing and autonomous relationships with home, relocating frequently either to begin the creative processes of designing and decorating anew or to avoid domestic obligation altogether by remaining in transit. She also looks at how women authors wrote female characters into existence who had strikingly different relationships with home, and contended with profound burdens of housekeeping in an oppressive domestic sphere. The disjunction between the authors' individual existences and the characters to whom they gave life reveals multiple narratives about women at home in nineteenth- and twentieth- century America. This interdisciplinary inquiry undertakes a dual treatment of domesticity in an effort to synthesize a more complete understanding of the relationships between social history and literary accomplishment. Syncretising domestic literature with domestic practice, Hellman appraises the ways in which the authors appropriate domestic rhetoric to address issues of political import: economy, health, and social welfare in the case of Stowe, material feminism for Alcott, the landscape for Cather, and World War I for Wharton. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/domesticity-and-design-in-american-womens-lives-and-literature aBook02749nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000028002152450099002432600034003423000023003765000033003995201661004325380036020936500014021296500030021436500031021736500024022046500022022286500029022507000030022798560081023099750009023909780203114353UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031143538 a10.4324/9780203114353 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aTuchman, Gaye,eauthor.10aEdging Women Outh[electronic resource] :bVictorian Novelists, Publishers, and Social Change. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aBefore about 1840, there was little prestige attached to the writing of novels, and most English novelists were women. By the turn of the twentieth century, "men of letters" acclaimed novels as a form of great literature, and most critically successful novelists were men. In the book, sociologist Gaye Tuchman examines how men succeeded in redefining a form of culture and in invading a white-collar occupation previously practiced mostly by women. Tuchman documents how men gradually supplanted women as novelists once novel-writing was perceived as potentially profitable, in part because of changes in the system of publishing and rewarding authors. Drawing on unusual data ranging from the archives of Macmillan and company (London) to an analysis of the lives and accomplishments of authors listed in the Dictionary of National Biography, she shows that rising literacy and the centralization of the publishing industry in London after 1840 increased literary opportunities and fostered men's success as novelists. Men redefined the nature of a good novel and applied a double standard in critically evaluating literary works by men and by women. They also received better contracts than women for novels of equivalent quality and sales. They were able to accomplish this, says Tuchman, because they were to a large extent the culture brokers - the publishers, publishers' readers, and reviewers of an elite art form. Both a sociological study of occupational gender transformation and a historical study of writing and publishing, this book will be a rich resource for students of the sociology of culture, literary criticism, and women's studies. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aFortin, Nina E.,eauthor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/edging-women-out aBook01275nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450088002152600034003033000023003375000033003605200200003935380036005936500014006296500030006436500031006736500024007046500022007286500029007507000029007798560120008089750009009289781315653570UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813156535708 a10.4324/9781315653570 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aEdith Wharton's the Custom of the Countryh[electronic resource] :bA Reassessment. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aBringing together leading Wharton scholars from Europe, and North America, this volume offers the first ever collection of essays on Edith Wharton's 1913 tour de force, The Custom of the Country. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aRattray, Laura,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/edith-whartons-the-custom-of-the-country-a-reassessment aBook01520nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450089002152600034003043000023003385000033003615200479003945380036008736500014009096500030009236500031009536500024009846500022010086500029010307000027010598560087010869750009011739781315363615UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813153636158 a10.4324/9781315363615 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aEleanor Marx (1855 - 1898)h[electronic resource] :bLife ℗ʺ Work ℗ʺ Contacts. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aKarl Marx's youngest daughter Eleanor (1855-98) is one of the most significant figures in the cultural politics of the late nineteenth century. As a feminist and radical socialist she never flinched from confrontation; as an aspiring actress, working journalist and literary translator she advanced contemporary understanding of Flaubert, Ibsen and Shakespeare. This collection of newly commissioned essays helps to establish the full extent of her outstanding achievements. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aStokes, John,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/eleanor-marx-1855-1898 aBook01893nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000027002152450079002422600034003213000023003555000033003785200834004115380036012456500014012816500030012956500031013256500024013566500022013806500029014028560115014319750009015469780203483787UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802034837878 a10.4324/9780203483787 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aCraik, W. A.,eauthor.10aElizabeth Gaskell and the English Provincial Novelh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFirst published in 1975, this book places Elizabeth Gaskell amongst the major novelists of the nineteenth-century. It considers how she has sometimes been overlooked, or admired for very few of her works, or for reasons that are not in fact central to her art. W. A. Craik looks at Gaskell's full-length novels with three main purposes: to analyse her development as a novelist, her achievements, and the nature of her very original work; to see what she owes to earlier novelists, what she learns from them, and how far she is an innovator; and to put her in relation to those other novelists who write on similar themes with comparable aims. This book establishes Elizabeth Gaskell's excellence in comparison with her peers by demonstrating how far she extended the possibilities of the novel, both in materials and techniques. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/elizabeth-gaskell-and-the-english-provincial-novel aBook01465nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000027002152450062002422600034003043000023003385000033003615200455003945380036008496500014008856500030008996500031009296500024009606500022009846500029010068560083010359750009011189780203358528UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802033585288 a10.4324/9780203358528 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aPurvis, June,eauthor.10aEmmeline Pankhursth[electronic resource] :bA biography. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aEmmeline Pankhurst was perhaps the most influential woman of the twentieth century. Today her name is synonymous with the 'votes for women' campaign and she is remembered as the most brave and inspirational suffrage leader in history. In this absorbing account of her life both before and after suffrage, June Purvis documents her early political work, her active role within the suffrage movement and her role as a wife and mother within her family. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/emmeline-pankhurst aBook01754nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450087002152600034003023000023003365000033003595200676003925380036010686500014011046500030011186500031011486500024011796500022012036500029012257000031012547000030012858560080013159750009013959780203120552UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031205528 a10.4324/9780203120552 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aEngendering Menh[electronic resource] :bThe Question of Male Feminist Criticism. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aOver the past several years, the question of men's relation to feminism has become a fiercely and sometimes bitterly debated subject. Engendering Men demonstrates the creative impact that feminist modes of inquiry have already had on a new generation of male critics. In the wake of feminism, many men have found it imperative to begin the task of retheorizing the male position in our culture. This collection of new essays brings together seventeen male critics whose work - on poetry, fiction, the Broadway stage, film and television, and broader cultural and psychoanalytic texts - is opening up new avenues in criticism, as well as in gender and feminist theory. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aBoone, Joseph A.,eeditor.1 aCadden, Michael,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/engendering-men aBook01547nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000027002152450133002422600034003753000023004095000033004325200421004655380036008866500014009226500030009366500031009666500024009976500022010216500029010437000031010728560085011039750009011889781315035154UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813150351548 a10.4324/9781315035154 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aMangan, J.A.,eauthor.10aFair Sex' to Feminismh[electronic resource] :bSport and the Socialization of Women in the Industrial and Post-Industrial Eras. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFirst published in 1987 with the aim of deepening understanding of the place of women in the cultural heritage of modern society, this collection of essays brings together the previously discrete perspectives of women's studies and the social history of sport. Using feminist ideas to explore the role of sport in women's lives, From Fair Sex to Feminism is a central text in the study of sport, gender and the body. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPark, Roberta J.,eauthor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/fair-sex-to-feminism aBook02693nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000029002152450100002442600034003443000023003785000033004015201642004345380036020766500014021126500030021266500031021566500024021876500022022116500029022338560084022629750009023469780203932155UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802039321558 a10.4324/9780203932155 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aMidgley, Clare,eauthor.10aFeminism and Empireh[electronic resource] :bWomen Activists in Imperial Britain, 1790 - 1865. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFeminism and Empire establishes the foundational impact that Britain's position as leading imperial power had on the origins of modern western feminism. Based on extensive new research, this study exposes the intimate links between debates on the 'woman question' and the constitution of 'colonial discourse' in order to highlight the centrality of empire to white middle-class women's activism in Britain. The book begins by exploring the relationship between the construction of new knowledge about colonised others and the framing of debates on the 'woman question' among advocates of women's rights and their evangelical opponents. Moving on to examine white middle-class women's activism on imperial issues in Britain, topics include the anti-slavery boycott of Caribbean sugar, the campaign against widow-burning in colonial India, and women's role in the foreign missionary movement prior to direct employment by the major missionary societies. Finally, Clare Midgley highlights how the organised feminist movement which emerged in the late 1850s linked promotion of female emigration to Britain's white settler colonies to a new ideal of independent English womanhood. Through this she shows how middle-class women's involvement in empire-focussed campaigns was crucial in enabling them to find opportunities to participate in life beyond the domestic sphere. In turn, British women had a distinctive impact in shaping the reform of empire. This original work throws fascinating new light on the roots of later 'imperial feminism' and contemporary debates concerning women's rights in an era of globalisation and neo-imperialism. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/feminism-and-empire aBook02756nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000030002152450090002452600034003353000023003695000033003925201713004255380036021386500014021746500030021886500031022186500024022496500022022736500029022958560085023249750009024099780203085042UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802030850428 a10.4324/9780203085042 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aBassnett, Susan,eauthor.10aFeminist Experiencesh[electronic resource] :bThe Women's Movement in Four Cultures. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe Women's Movement is usually referred to as if it were a constant, global phenomenon. There are women's movements in Europe, North and South America, Africa, the Middle East, India, Japan and Australia, and many women and men assume that they are regional manifestations of the same thing, and share a common core. Susan Bassnett has lived and been involved in the struggles of the women's movement in the United States, Italy and the United Kingdom, and has had extensive contacts with feminists in the German Democratic Republic. On the basis of her personal experiences and study of women's history and literature in these countries she is able to present a striking picture of the variety of feminist aims, tactics and priorities in the four countries, and of the character of the women's movement in four very different cultures. In Italy, she focuses on the violence of the women's movement - its intellectualism and energy. In analysing the American women's movement she dwells on its roots in the past, and its faith in pragmatic solutions. The GDR presents completely different questions, hinging on the relationship between state socialism and feminism. In the UK, Susan Bassnett finds herself returning to that all-pervasive aspect of British life - class, and its importance for feminists. Throughout, the author writes with a double commitment: first, to furthering our understanding of the diversity of aims of women's movements and their common ground - the no-man's land of female existence; second, to making her book as accessible as possible to all feminists, through drawing on her own personal experience of countries in which she has lived, worked, travelled, and made friends. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/feminist-experiences aBook02493nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000029002152450113002442600034003573000023003915000033004145201414004475380036018616500014018976500030019116500031019416500024019726500022019966500029020188560099020479750009021469780203582688UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802035826888 a10.4324/9780203582688 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aWolosky, Shira,eauthor.10aFeminist Theory across Disciplinesh[electronic resource] :bFeminist Community and American Women's Poetry. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aDefying traditional definitions of public and private as gendered terms, and broadening discussion of women's writing in relation to feminist work done in other fields, this study addresses American women's poetry from the seventeenth to late-twentieth century. Engaging the fields of literary criticism, anthropology, psychology, history, political theory, religious culture, cultural studies, and poetics, this study provides entry into some of the founding feminist discussions across disciplines, moving beyond current scholarship to pursue an interpretation of feminism's defining interests and assumptions in the context of women's writing. The author emphasizes and explores how women's writing expresses their active participation in community and civic life, emerging from and shaping a woman's selfhood as constituted through relationships, not only on the personal level, but as forming community commitments. This distinctive formation of the self finds expression in women's voices and other poetic forms of expression, with the aesthetic power of poetry itself bringing different arenas of human experience to bear on each other in mutual interrogation and reflection. Women poets have addressed the public world, directly or through a variety of poetic structures and figures, and in doing so they have defined and expressed specific forms of selfhood engaged in and committed to communal life. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/feminist-theory-across-disciplines aBook01868nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000029002152450056002442600034003003000023003345000033003575200813003905380036012036500014012396500030012536500031012836500024013146500022013386500029013607000028013898560092014179750009015099780203087749UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802030877498 a10.4324/9780203087749 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aDale, Jennifer,eauthor.10aFeminists and State Welfareh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aDesigned for students of social policy and women's studies, this text gives a readable account of the wide range of feminist ideas about women and welfare. The authors draw on feminist theory, research and analysis to explore women's experiences of welfare, and the debates within feminism on how and why the welfare state oppresses women. In an original contribution they discuss women's impact on the development of the welfare state both as feminist campaigners and as pioneers of new welfare professions. The book concludes by reviewing contemporary feminist strategies to transform the welfare state to meet women's needs. Whilst the authors put forward their own evaluation of these different feminist approaches, they aim to leave readers with plenty of scope to make up their own minds on the issues. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aFoster, Peggy,eauthor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/feminists-and-state-welfare aBook01528nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000039002152450136002542600034003903000023004245000033004475200347004805380036008276500014008636500030008776500031009076500024009386500022009626500029009848560168010139750009011819781315656106UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813156561068 a10.4324/9781315656106 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aCordell, Sigrid Anderson,eauthor.10aFictions of Dissenth[electronic resource] :bReclaiming Authority in Transatlantic Women's Writing of the Late Nineteenth Century. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFin-de-si©·cle fiction by British female aesthetes and American women regionalists stages moments of rebellion when female characters rise up and insist on the right to maintain control of their creations. Cordell asserts that these revolutionary acts constitute a transatlantic conversation about aesthetic practice and creative ownership. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/fictions-of-dissent-reclaiming-authority-in-transatlantic-womens-writing-of-the-late-nineteenth-century aBook02115nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450047002152600034002623000023002965000033003195201118003525380036014706500014015066500030015206500031015506500024015816500022016056500029016277000029016568560083016859750009017689780203104163UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031041638 a10.4324/9780203104163 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFit Work for Womenh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis book presents a collection of papers which discuss the origins of the domestic ideal and its effects on activities usually undertaken by women: not only on women's wage work, but also on activities either not defined as work or accorded an ambiguous status. It discusses the formation of the ideology of domesticity, philanthropy and its effects on official policy and on women, landladies in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, working-class radical suffragists, and Labour Party and trade union attitudes to feminists. Modern society of 1979, when the book was first published, is analysed in a discussion of militancy and acquiescence among women wage workers, a look at how and why the legal system reinforces activity specialisation according to gender, and an examination of why both pre-pre-war capitalism and the modern Welfare State have been unable to meet the needs of dependents. This collection reflects the increasing recognition that in order to understand women's roles today, it is necessary to examine not only their current manifestations, but also their origins and early development. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aBurman, Sandra,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/fit-work-for-women aBook02306nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450090002152600034003053000023003395000033003625201183003955380036015786500014016146500030016286500031016586500024016896500022017136500029017357000030017647000030017948560123018249750009019479781315317946UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813153179468 a10.4324/9781315317946 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aGender and Politics in the Age of Letter-Writing, 1750 - 2000h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aLetters have long been an outlet for political expression, whether they articulate the personal politics of the daily routine or the political views of individuals who witness or participate in dramatic events. In addition, letters can be unusually revealing records of the relations between men and women. Though letters have frequently been studied as a privileged space for literary, social, and cultural expression, the three-dimensional relationship of politics, gender, and letters has not been the focus of an entire volume. The nineteen essays in this collection examine how the gendered nature of political literacy is revealed over a 250-year period through letter writing, whether the writer is famous or unknown, the wife of a prominent politician or activist, a political prisoner or political militant. Ranging wide in terms of subject matter and geography, the contributors examine correspondence that ponders familial concerns, as well as letters providing political commentary on the effects of war or revolution on everyday life. Among the impressive group of international scholars are Jim Allen, Clare Brant, Edith Gelles, Jane Rendall, and Si©Øn Reynolds. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aBland, Caroline,eeditor.1 aCross, M©Łire,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/gender-and-politics-in-the-age-of-letter-writing-1750-2000 aBook01886nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000038002152450098002532600034003513000023003855000033004085200778004415380036012196500014012556500030012696500031012996500024013306500022013546500029013768560134014059750009015399780203932575UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802039325758 a10.4324/9780203932575 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aFletcher, Holly Berkley,eauthor.10aGender and the American Temperance Movement of the Nineteenth Centuryh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aDuring the nineteenth century, the American temperance movement underwent a visible, gendered shift in its leadership as it evolved from a male-led movement to one dominated by the women. However, this transition of leadership masked the complexity and diversity of the temperance movement. Through an examination of the two icons of the movement -- the self-made man and the crusading woman -- Fletcher demonstrates the evolving meaning and context of temperance and gender. Temperance becomes a story of how the debate on racial and gender equality became submerged in service to a corporate, political enterprise and how men's and women's identities and functions were reconfigured in relationship to each other and within this shifting political and cultural landscape. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/gender-and-the-american-temperance-movement-of-the-nineteenth-century aBook01953nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000029002152450085002442600034003293000023003635000033003865200880004195380036012996500014013356500030013496500031013796500024014106500022014346500029014568560121014859750009016069780203104101UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031041018 a10.4324/9780203104101 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aDyhouse, Carol,eauthor.10aGirls Growing up in Late Victorian and Edwardian Englandh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aGirls learn about "femininity" from childhood onwards, first through their relationships in the family, and later from their teachers and peers. Using sources which vary from diaries to Inspector's reports, this book studies the socialization of middle- and working-class girls in late Victorian and early-Edwardian England. It traces the ways in which schooling at all social levels at this time tended to reinforce lessons in the sexual division of labour and patterns of authority between men and women, which girls had already learned at home. Considering the social anxieties that helped to shape the curriculum offered to working-class girls through the period 1870-1920, the book goes on to focus on the emergence of a social psychology of adolescent girlhood in the early-twentieth century and finally, examines the relationship between feminism and girls' education. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/girls-growing-up-in-late-victorian-and-edwardian-england aBook01836nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000032002152450143002472600034003903000023004245000033004475200727004805380036012076500014012436500030012576500031012876500024013186500022013426500029013648560096013939750009014899780203103517UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031035178 a10.4324/9780203103517 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aEisenstein, Sarah,eauthor.10aGive Us Bread But Give Us Rosesh[electronic resource] :bWorking women's consciousness in the United States, 1890 to the First World War. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aRooted in the printed sources of the period, this book reconstructs the attitudes of a pioneer generation of young women to the conflicts brought about by their new experience of employment outside their homes, and to changes in work and family relationships. In the 1890s and after the still prevalent Victorian conception of respectable womanhood excluded wage-earning women. Yet working-class women themselves did not acquiesce in this judgement, and Eisenstein's exploration of Victorian ideas about women and work - using the contemporary middle-class literature of advice and prescription to this new workforce - makes a historical study which is a classic of its kind. The book was originally published in 1983. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/give-us-bread-but-give-us-roses aBook01865nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000033002152450113002482600034003613000023003955000033004185200802004515380036012536500014012896500030013036500031013336500024013646500022013886500029014108560079014399750009015189780203694497UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802036944978 a10.4324/9780203694497 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aOertel, Kristen T.,eauthor.10aHarriet Tubmanh[electronic resource] :bSlavery, the Civil War, and Civil Rights in the Nineteenth Century. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aEscaped slave, Civil War spy, scout, and nurse, and champion of women's suffrage, Harriet Tubman is an icon of heroism. Perhaps most famous for leading enslaved people to freedom through the Underground Railroad, Tubman was dubbed "Moses" by followers. But abolition and the close of the Civil War were far from the end of her remarkable career. Tubman continued to fight for black civil rights and campaigned fiercely for women's suffrage throughout the remainder of her life. In this vivid, concise narrative supplemented by primary documents, Kristen T. Oertel introduces readers to Tubman's extraordinary life, from the trauma of her childhood slavery to her civil rights activism in the late nineteenth century, and in the process reveals a nation's struggle over its most central injustices. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/harriet-tubman aBook01941nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000029002152450110002442600034003543000023003885000033004115200864004445380036013086500014013446500030013586500031013886500024014196500022014436500029014658560100014949750009015949780203483619UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802034836198 a10.4324/9780203483619 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aGori, Gigliola,eauthor.10aItalian Fascism and the Female Bodyh[electronic resource] :bSport, Submissive Women and Strong Mothers. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis is the first text to examine women and sport in Italy during the period 1861-1945. To qualify and quantify the impact of fascism on Italian Women's sport, the author first of all examines the pre-fascist period in terms of female physical culture. The text then describes how during the fascist era, women moved strictly within a framework designed by medicine and eugenics, religious and traditional education. The country aspired to emancipation, as promised by the fascist revolution but emancipation was hard to advance under the fascist regime because of male hegemonic trends in the country. This book shows how the engagement of women in some sporting activity did promote and support some gender emancipation. The conclusion of the book demonstrates how, in the post-war period, women found it hard to advance further on, for a number of reasons. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/italian-fascism-and-the-female-body aBook01685nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000037002152450105002522600034003573000023003915000033004145200612004475380036010596500014010956500030011096500031011396500024011706500022011946500029012168560093012459750009013389781315655598UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813156555988 a10.4324/9781315655598 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aSteiner, Enit Karafili,eauthor.10aJane Austen's Civilized Womenh[electronic resource] :bMorality, Gender and the Civilizing Process. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aJane Austen's six complete novels and her juvenilia are examined in the context of civil society and gender. Steiner's study uses a variety of contexts to appraise Austen's work: Scottish Enlightenment theories of societal development, early-Romantic discourses on gender roles, modern sociological theories on the civilizing process and postmodern feminist positions on moral development and interpersonal relations. Austen is presented as a writer who not only participated in late eighteenth-century debates, but who is able to address twenty-first-century concerns of a theoretical and practical nature. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/jane-austens-civilized-women aBook02714nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450098002152600034003133000023003475000033003705201602004035380036020056500014020416500030020556500031020856500024021166500022021406500029021627000035021917000026022268560103022529750009023559780203855584UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802038555848 a10.4324/9780203855584 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aJohn Stuart Mill ́ Thought and Influenceh[electronic resource] :bThe saint of rationalism. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMore than 200 years after his birth, and 150 years after the publication of his most famous essay On Liberty, John Stuart Mill remains one of the towering intellectual figures of the Western tradition. This book combines an up-to-date assessment of the philosophical legacy of Mill's arguments, his complex version of liberalism and his account of the relationship between character and ethical and political commitment. Bringing together key international scholars, including Martha Nussbaum and Peter Singer, this book combines the latest insights of Mill scholarship with a long-term appraisal of the ways in which Mill's work has been received and interpreted from the time of his death in 1873 to today. The book offers compelling insights into Mill's posthumous fate and reputation; his youthful political and intellectual activism; his views on the formation of character; the development of his thought on logic; his differences from his father and Bentham; his astonishingly prescient, environmentally sensitive and 'green' thought; his relation to virtue ethics; his conception of higher pleasures and its relation to his understanding of justice; his feminist thought and its place in contemporary debates and feminist discourses; his defence of free speech and its fundamental significance for his liberalism; and his continued contemporary relevance on a number of major issues. This book will be of interest to students and scholars of politics, political theory, philosophy, history, English, psychology, and also cultural studies, empire studies, nationalism and ethnicity studies. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aVarouxakis, Georgios,eeditor.1 aKelly, Paul,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/john-stuart-mill-thought-and-influence aBook02255nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450072002152600034002873000023003215000033003445201185003775380036015626500014015986500030016126500031016426500024016736500022016976500029017197000026017487000031017748560091018059750009018969780203644935UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802036449358 a10.4324/9780203644935 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aKate Chopin's The Awakeningh[electronic resource] :bA Sourcebook. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aDamned upon publication for engaging with the taboo issues of female sexuality and infidelity, Kate Chopin's The Awakening (1899) is now hailed as a key early feminist text and an important work of American literature. This sourcebook combines accessible commentary with reprinted documents to provide the ideal introduction to this widely debated novel. The editors offer: - extensive coverage of the contexts to the work, including biographical information on Chopin and the social and historical backgrounds to her writing - an outline of the critical reception of the novel from the early reviews to contemporary debates, and extracts from influential essays - selected chapters of the original text, reproduced with extensive commentary on key issues and suggestions on links with contextual and critical materials - a guide to further reading, ideal for extended independent study. Providing all the tools for engaged, informed individual analysis of the text, this sourcebook will greatly enrich any reading of The Awakening. It is an essential starting point for students of American literature and women's writing, or for anyone fascinated by Chopin's controversial work. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aBeer, Janet,eeditor.1 aNolan, Elizabeth,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/kate-chopins-the-awakening aBook01318nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000042002152450078002572600034003353000023003695000033003925200249004255380036006746500014007106500030007246500031007546500024007856500022008096500029008318560111008609750009009719781315653372UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813156533728 a10.4324/9781315653372 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aOulton, Carolyn W. de la L.,eauthor.10aLet the Flowers Goh[electronic resource] :bA Life of Mary Cholmondeley. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aGiving a comprehensive critique of Cholmondeley's writings, Oulton analyzes the inspiration and influences behind some of her greatest work and provides an appealing biography on a writer whose work is of increasing interest to modern scholars. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/let-the-flowers-go-a-life-of-mary-cholmondeley aBook02258nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000030002152450089002452600034003343000023003685000033003915201176004245380036016006500014016366500030016506500031016806500024017116500022017356500029017578560125017869750009019119781315592602UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813155926028 a10.4324/9781315592602 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aStyler, Rebecca,eauthor.10aLiterary Theology by Women Writers of the Nineteenth Centuryh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aExamining popular fiction, life writing, poetry and political works, Rebecca Styler explores women's contributions to theology in the nineteenth century. Female writers, Styler argues, acted as amateur theologians by use of a range of literary genres. Through these, they questioned the Christian tradition relative to contemporary concerns about political ethics, gender identity, and personal meaning. Among Styler's subjects are novels by Emma Worboise; writers of collective biography, including Anna Jameson and Clara Balfour, who study Bible women in order to address contemporary concerns about 'The Woman Question'; poetry by Anne Bront©±; and political writing by Harriet Martineau and Josephine Butler. As Styler considers the ways in which each writer negotiates the gender constraints and opportunities that are available to her religious setting and literary genre, she shows the varying degrees of frustration which these writers express with the inadequacy of received religion to meet their personal and ethical needs. All find resources within that tradition, and within their experience, to reconfigure Christianity in creative, and more earthly ways. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/literary-theology-by-women-writers-of-the-nineteenth-century aBook01214nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450059002152600034002743000023003085000033003315200139003645380036005036500014005396500030005536500031005836500024006146500022006386500029006607000042006897000029007318560095007609750009008559781315653358UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813156533588 a10.4324/9781315653358 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMary Cholmondeley Reconsideredh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis book provides a necessary critical reappraisal of one of the most challenging and subversive of nineteenth-century women writers. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aOulton, Carolyn W. de la L.,eeditor.1 aSchatz, SueAnn,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/mary-cholmondeley-reconsidered aBook02665nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000029002152450077002442600034003213000023003555000033003785201637004115380036020486500014020846500030020986500031021286500024021596500022021836500029022058560084022349750009023189780203101322UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031013228 a10.4324/9780203101322 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aTodd, Janet M.,eauthor.10aMary Wollstonecrafth[electronic resource] :bAn Annotated Bibliography. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFirst published in 1976, this was the first comprehensive annotated bibliography of Mary Wollstonecraft's works and most of the critical and biographical comments on her in English written between 1788 and 1975. It is designed both as a research tool for scholars and students and as a revelation of the quantity and variety of comment. The book is divided into three main chronological time periods of publication date and suggests the vagaries of Wollstonecraft's posthumous reputation and indicates the peaks and troughs of interest. Known as an eighteenth-century British writer, philosopher, and advocate of women's rights, Mary Wollstonecraft has received much critical attention with particular interest in her unorthodox lifestyle of the time and is now regarded as one of the founding feminist philosophers.First published in 1976, this was the first comprehensive annotated bibliography of Mary Wollstonecraft's works and most of the critical and biographical comments on her in English written between 1788 and 1975. It is designed both as a research tool for scholars and students and as a revelation of the quantity and variety of comment. The book is divided into three main chronological time periods of publication date and suggests the vagaries of Wollstonecraft's posthumous reputation and indicates the peaks and troughs of interest. Known as an eighteenth-century British writer, philosopher, and advocate of women's rights, Mary Wollstonecraft has received much critical attention with particular interest in her unorthodox lifestyle of the time and is now regarded as one of the founding feminist philosophers. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/mary-wollstonecraft aBook01819nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000031002152450131002462600034003773000023004115000033004345200656004675380036011236500014011596500030011736500031012036500024012346500022012586500029012808560163013099750009014729781315653792UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813156537928 a10.4324/9781315653792 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aHalldenius, Lena,eauthor.10aMary Wollstonecraft and Feminist Republicanismh[electronic resource] :bIndependence, Rights and the Experience of Unfreedom. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMary Wollstonecraft is a writer whose work continues to provoke scholarly debate. But Wollstonecraft the historical figure often obscures her importance as a philosopher. Halldenius explores Wollstonecraft's political philosophy, focusing on her treatment of republicanism and independence, to propose a new way of reading her work - that of a 'feminist republican'. Wollstonecraft's works of fiction and non-fiction are analysed and the use of her own experience of a lack of freedom (the lot of an eighteenth-century woman) is examined as a valid line of philosophical enquiry and not - as others have viewed them - as a form of autobiography. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/mary-wollstonecraft-and-feminist-republicanism-independence-rights-and-the-experience-of-unfreedom aBook01554nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450126002152600034003413000023003755000033003985200432004315380036008636500014008996500030009136500031009436500024009746500022009986500029010207000027010497000025010768560094011019750009011959780203059913UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802030599138 a10.4324/9780203059913 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMaternity and Gender Policiesh[electronic resource] :bWomen and the Rise of the European Welfare States, 1880s - 1950s. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis collection sets out to analyze the influence of women's movements on the emergence of Europe's welfare state from the 1880s to the 1950s, and the limits of that influence. It compares the women's movements - and social policies concerning women - in the dictatorships of Italy, Germany and Spain with the democracies in Britain, France and Scandinavia. It throws new lights on feminism, especially in the inter-war period. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aBock, Gisela,eeditor.1 aThane, Pat,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/maternity-and-gender-policies aBook01326nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450109002152600034003243000023003585000033003815200226004145380036006406500014006766500030006906500031007206500024007516500022007756500029007977000026008267000028008528560087008809750009009679781315021164UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813150211648 a10.4324/9781315021164 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMothers of a New Worldh[electronic resource] :bMaternalist Politics and the Origins of Welfare States. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis book explores the historical evolution of such claims, and their relationship to the rise of women's movements and the emergence of welfare states in Western industrializing countries at the turn of the 19th century. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aKoven, Seth,eeditor.1 aMichel, Sonya,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/mothers-of-a-new-world aBook02988nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450122002152600034003373000023003715000033003945201870004275380036022976500014023336500030023476500031023776500024024086500022024326500029024547000028024837000032025118560086025439750009026299780415655743UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804156557438 a10.4324/9780415655743 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aNew Woman Hybriditiesh[electronic resource] :bFemininity, feminism and international consumer culture, 1880 - 1930. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aSince the 1970s, the literary and cultural politics of the turn-of-the-century New Woman have received increasing academic attention. Whether she is seen as the emblem of sexual anarchy, an agent of mediation between mass market and modernist cultures, or as a symptom of the consolidation of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century political liberation movements, the New Woman represents a site of cultural and socio-political contestation and acts as a marker of modernity. This book explores the diversity of meanings ascribed to the New Woman in the context of cultural debates conducted within and across a wide range of national frameworks including the UK, Canada, North America, Europe and Japan. The key concept of 'hybridities' is used to elucidate the national and ethnic multiplicity of the 'modern woman' as well as to locate this figure both within international consumer culture and within feminist writing. The book is structured around four key themes. 'Hybridities' examines the instabilities of New Woman identities and discourses in relation to both national/ethnic contexts and the textual parameters of New Woman writings. 'Through the (Periodical) Looking Glass' is concerned with the periodical press and its production and circulation of New Woman images. 'Communities of Women' interrogates feminist efforts to influence and shape this process by mimicking or subverting dominant models of representation and by establishing alternative spaces for the articulation of New Woman subjectivities. 'Race and the New Woman' inspects white New Women's investment in hegemonic racial discourses, looking at the ways in which black and non-Western women inserted liberationist discourses into the New Woman debate. This book will be essential reading for advanced students and researchers of American Studies, Women's Studies and Women's History. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHeilmann, Ann,eeditor.1 aBeetham, Margaret,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/new-woman-hybridities aBook04851nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450120002152600034003353000023003695000033003925203733004255380036041586500014041946500030042086500031042386500024042696500022042936500029043157000028043447000032043728560088044049750009044929780203643211UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802036432118 a10.4324/9780203643211 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aNew Woman Hybriditiesh[electronic resource] :bFemininity, feminism and international consumer culture, 1880-1930. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aSince the 1970s, the literary and cultural politics of the turn-of-the-century New Woman have received increasing academic attention. Whether she is seen as the emblem of sexual anarchy, an agent of mediation between mass market and modernist cultures, or as a symptom of the consolidation of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century political liberation movements, the New Woman represents a site of cultural and socio-political contestation and acts as a marker of modernity. This book explores the diversity of meanings ascribed to the New Woman in the context of cultural debates conducted within and across a wide range of national frameworks including the UK, Canada, North America, Europe and Japan. The key concept of 'hybriclities' is used to elucidate the national and ethnic multiplicity of the 'modern woman' as well as to locate this figure both within international consumer culture and within feminist writing. The book is structured around four key themes. Hybridities examines the instabilities of New Woman identities and discourses in relation to both national/ethnic contexts and the textual parameters of New Woman writings. 'Through the (Periodical) Looking Glass' is concerned with the periodical press and its production and circulation of New Woman images. 'Communities of Women' interrogates feminist efforts to influence and shape this process by mimicking or subverting dominant models of representation and by establishing alternative spaces for the articulation of New Woman subjectivities. 'Race and the New Woman' inspects white New Women's investment in hegemonic racial discourses, looking at the ways in which black and non-Western women inserted liberationist discourses into the New Woman debate. This book will be essential reading for advanced students and researchers of American Studies, Women's Studies and Women's History.Since the 1970s, the literary and cultural politics of the turn-of-the-century New Woman have received increasing academic attention. Whether she is seen as the emblem of sexual anarchy, an agent of mediation between mass market and modernist cultures, or as a symptom of the consolidation of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century political liberation movements, the New Woman represents a site of cultural and socio-political contestation and acts as a marker of modernity. This book explores the diversity of meanings ascribed to the New Woman in the context of cultural debates conducted within and across a wide range of national frameworks including the UK, Canada, North America, Europe and Japan. The key concept of 'hybriclities' is used to elucidate the national and ethnic multiplicity of the 'modern woman' as well as to locate this figure both within international consumer culture and within feminist writing. The book is structured around four key themes. Hybridities examines the instabilities of New Woman identities and discourses in relation to both national/ethnic contexts and the textual parameters of New Woman writings. 'Through the (Periodical) Looking Glass' is concerned with the periodical press and its production and circulation of New Woman images. 'Communities of Women' interrogates feminist efforts to influence and shape this process by mimicking or subverting dominant models of representation and by establishing alternative spaces for the articulation of New Woman subjectivities. 'Race and the New Woman' inspects white New Women's investment in hegemonic racial discourses, looking at the ways in which black and non-Western women inserted liberationist discourses into the New Woman debate. This book will be essential reading for advanced students and researchers of American Studies, Women's Studies and Women's History. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHeilmann, Ann,eeditor.1 aBeetham, Margaret,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/new-woman-hybridities-1 aBook02091nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450112002152600034003273000023003615000033003845200993004175380036014106500014014466500030014606500031014906500024015216500022015456500029015677000035015968560113016319750009017449781315598321UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813155983218 a10.4324/9781315598321 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aNineteenth-Century American Women Write Religionh[electronic resource] :bLived Theologies and Literature. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aNineteenth-century American women's culture was immersed in religious experience and female authors of the era employed representations of faith to various cultural ends. Focusing primarily on non-canonical texts, this collection explores the diversity of religious discourse in nineteenth-century women's literature. The contributors examine fiction, political writings, poetry, and memoirs by professional authors, social activists, and women of faith, including Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Angelina and Sarah Grimk©♭, Louisa May Alcott, Rebecca Harding Davis, Harriet E. Wilson, Sarah Piatt, Julia Ward Howe, Julia A. J. Foote, Lucy Mack Smith, Rebecca Cox Jackson, and Fanny Newell. Embracing the complexities of lived religion in women's culture-both its repressive and its revolutionary potential-Nineteenth-Century American Women Write Religion articulates how American women writers adopted the language of religious sentiment for their own cultural, political, or spiritual ends. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aWearn, Mary McCartin,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/nineteenth-century-american-women-write-religion aBook01790nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450106002152600034003213000023003555000033003785200734004115380036011456500014011816500030011956500031012256500024012566500022012806500029013027000028013318560084013599750009014439780203326770UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802033267708 a10.4324/9780203326770 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPolitics and Societyh[electronic resource] :bThe Journals of Lady Knightley of Fawsley 1885 - 1913. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aLouisa Mary, Lady Knightley of Fawnsley, was a woman of unusually wide interests, especially in the field of public affairs. In an age when few opportunities arose for women to make a contribution to political and feminist matters, Lady Knightley was an early pioneer of both causes. Denied the vote as a woman, she was a leading advocate of the campaign for constitutional, non-militant action to achieve the franchise, a cause which she continued to espouse until her death in 1913. Her later journals, written with warmth and humour, provide a fascinating picture of politics and society in England at a time of crucial change. Her journals provide many insights into rural politics following the Reform Acts of 1884 and 1885. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aGordon, Peter,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/politic-and-society aBook02764nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000031002152450137002462600034003833000023004175000033004405201678004735380036021516500014021876500030022016500031022316500024022626500022022866500029023088560080023379750009024179780203335314UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802033353148 a10.4324/9780203335314 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aJeydel, Alana S.,eauthor.10aPolitical Womenh[electronic resource] :bThe women's movement, political institutions, the battle for women's suffrage and the ERA. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aUnder what conditions are political elites responsive to social movements, and when do social movements gain access to political elites? This book explores this question with regard to the women's movement in the U.S., asking under what conditions are Congress and the presidency responsive to the women's movement, and when will the women's movement gain access to Congress and the presidency? The book systematically compares the relations between political leaders and each of the three waves of the women's movement - 1848 - 1889, 1890 - 1928, and 1960 - 1985, in light of the political dynamics that each wave faced. The author utilizes perspectives and methods from the fields of Political Science, Sociology, and History to illustrate the ways in which changing political dynamics impacted the battle for both women's suffrage and the Equal Rights Amendment. The book clearly demonstrates the importance of a dynamic institutional analysis of social movement - political elite relations. The author argues that without such an analysis we cannot fully understand the conditions under which legislation of interest to movements will be lobbied for by presidents, introduced into Congress, granted hearings, receive favorable reports, and be reported to the floors of the House and Senate. A significant addition to the study of women's history and American Studies, Political Women illustrates the important roles that political leaders played in the battle for women's suffrage and the ERA and demonstrates the political savvy among women suffrage activists who recognized the institutional barriers present in the U.S. political system and fought to overcome them. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/political-women aBook02243nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000027002152450069002422600034003113000023003455000033003685201204004015380036016056500014016416500030016556500031016856500024017166500022017406500029017628560105017919750009018969780203104040UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031040408 a10.4324/9780203104040 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aMcHugh, Paul,eauthor.10aProstitution and Victorian Social Reformh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aIn the mid-nineteenth century many parts of England and Wales were still subjected to a system of regulated prostitution which, by identifying and detaining for treatment infected prostitutes, aimed to protect members of the armed forces (94 per cent of whom were forbidden to marry) from venereal diseases. The coercive nature of the Contagious Diseases Acts and the double standard which allowed the continuance of prostitution on the ground that the prostitute 'herself the supreme type of vice, she is ultimately the most efficient guardian of virtue', aroused the ire of many reformers, not only women's rights campaigners. Paul McHugh analyses the social composition of the different repeal and reform movements - the liberal reformists, the passionate struggle of the charismatic Josephine Butler, the Tory reformers whose achievement was in the improvement of preventative medicine, and finally the Social Purity movement of the 1880s which favoured a coercive approach. This is a fascinating study of ideals and principles in action, of pressure-group strategy, and of individual leaders in the repeal movement's sixteen year progress to victory. The book was originally publised in 1980. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/prostitution-and-victorian-social-reform aBook01729nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000031002152450112002462600034003583000023003925000033004155200653004485380036011016500014011376500030011516500031011816500024012126500022012366500029012588560095012879750009013829780203881941UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802038819418 a10.4324/9780203881941 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aLevine, Philippa,eauthor.10aProstitution, Race, and Politicsh[electronic resource] :bPolicing Venereal Disease in the British Empire. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aIn addition to shouldering the blame for the increasing incidence of venereal disease among sailors and soldiers, prostitutes throughout the British Empire also bore the burden of the contagious diseases ordinances that the British government passed. By studying how British authorities enforced these laws in four colonial sites between the 1860s and the end of the First World War, Philippa Levine reveals how myths and prejudices about the sexual practices of colonized peoples not only had a direct and often punishing effect on how the laws operated, but how they also further justified the distinction between the colonizer and the colonized. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/prostitution-race-and-politics aBook02648nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000037002152450124002522600034003763000023004105000033004335201572004665380036020386500014020746500030020886500031021186500024021496500022021736500029021958560077022249750009023019780203603536UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802036035368 a10.4324/9780203603536 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aHolton, Sandra Stanley,eauthor.10aQuaker Womenh[electronic resource] :bPersonal life, memory and radicalism in the lives of women Friends, 1780 - 1930. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aOne nineteenth-century commentator noted the 'public' character of Quaker women as signalling a new era in female history. This study examines such claims through the story of middle-class women Friends from among the kinship circle created by the marriage in 1839 of Elizabeth Priestman and the future radical Quaker statesman, John Bright. The lives discussed here cover a period from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries, and include several women Friends active in radical politics and the women's movement, in the service of which they were able to mobilise extensive national and international networks. They also created and preserved a substantial archive of private papers, comprising letters and diaries full of humour and darkness, the spiritual and the mundane, family confidences and public debate, the daily round and affairs of state. The discovery of such a collection makes it possible to examine the relationship between the personal and public lives of these women Friends, explored through a number of topics including the nature of Quaker domestic and church cultures; the significance of kinship and church membership for the building of extensive Quaker networks; the relationship between Quaker religious values and women's participation in civil society and radical politics and the women's rights movement. There are also fresh perspectives on the political career of John Bright, provided by his fond but frank women kin. This new study is a must read for all those interested in the history of women, religion and politics. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/quaker-women aBook02026nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000031002152450065002462600034003113000023003455000033003685200992004015380036013936500014014296500030014436500031014736500024015046500022015286500029015508560100015799750009016799780203069912UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802030699128 a10.4324/9780203069912 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aOrleck, Annelise,eauthor.10aRethinking American Women's Activismh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aIn this enthralling narrative, Annelise Orleck chronicles the history of the American women's movement from the 19th century to the present. Starting with an incisive introduction that calls for a reconceptualization of American feminist history to encompass multiple streams of women's activism, she weaves the personal with the political, vividly evoking the events and people who participated in our era's most far-reaching social revolutions. In short, thematic chapters, Orleck enables readers to understand the impact of women's activism, and highlights how feminism has flourished through much of the past century within social movements that have too often been treated as completely separate. Showing that women's activism has taken many forms, has intersected with issues of class and race, and has continued during periods of backlash, Rethinking American Women's Activism is a perfect introduction to the subject for anyone interested in women's history and social movements. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/rethinking-american-womens-activism aBook02234nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000032002152450119002472600034003663000023004005000033004235201155004565380036016116500014016476500030016616500031016916500024017226500022017466500029017688560090017979750009018879781315727349UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813157273498 a10.4324/9781315727349 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aEvans, Richard J.,eauthor.10aRethinking German Historyh[electronic resource] :bNineteenth-Century Germany and the Origins of the Third Reich. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aIn Rethinking German History, first published in 1987, Richard J. Evans argues for a social-historical approach to the German past that pays equal attention to objective social structures and subjective values and experiences. If German history has been seen as an exception to the 'normal' development of Western society, this is not least because historians have until recently largely failed to look beyond the world of high politics, institutions, organizations and ideologies to broader historical problems of German society and German mentalities. By applying and adapting approaches learned from French and British social history as they have been developed over the last quarter of a century, it is possible to achieve a rethinking of German history which does away with many of the textbook myths that have encrusted the historiography of Germany for so long. This book will be valuable for students of German history and politics, and brings together essays widely used in teaching. Its broad coverage of social history will also be useful to all those interested in contemporary historiography or the comparative study of European history. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/rethinking-german-history aBook01880nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450100002152600034003153000023003495000033003725200822004055380036012276500014012636500030012776500031013076500024013386500022013626500029013847000031014138560089014449750009015339780203120446UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031204468 a10.4324/9780203120446 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aRewriting the Victoriansh[electronic resource] :bTheory, History, and the Politics of Gender. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis collection of essays, both feminist and historical, analyzes power relations between men and women in the Victorian period. This volume is the first to reshape Victorian studies from the perspective of the postmodern return to history, and is variously influenced by Marxism, sociology, anthropology, and post-structuralist theories of language and subjectivity. It analyzes the struggle for legitimacy and recognition in Victorian institutions and the struggle over meanings in ideological representation of the gendered subject in texts. Contributors cover diverse topics, including Victorian ideologies of motherhood, the male gaze, the cult of the male child genius in narrative painting, the press, and Victorian women and the French Revolution, discussing both well-known and less familiar Victorian texts. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aShires, Linda M.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/rewriting-the-victorians aBook02066nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000028002152450121002432600034003643000023003985000033004215201001004545380036014556500014014916500030015056500031015356500024015666500022015906500029016128560078016419750009017199780203104002UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031040028 a10.4324/9780203104002 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aRosen, Andrew,eauthor.10aRise Up, Women!h[electronic resource] :bThe Militant Campaign of the Women's Social and Political Union 1903-1914. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe suffragette movement shattered the domestic tranquillity of Edwardian England. This book is an original and searching study of the formidable organization which led this campaign: the Women's Social and Political Union. With the use of previously unpublished correspondence of Mrs Emmeline Pankhurst, her colleagues and such political leaders as Asquith, Balfour and Lloyd George, the author views the development of ever more extreme and violent forms of militancy not as a series of amusing exploits and incidents but as the carefully calculated political strategy the suffragettes intended it to be. He examines the reasons for the remarkable effectiveness of militant tactics in making women's enfranchisement a political issue of central importance, and shows why militancy failed to secure this right prior to the outbreak of war in August 1914. He assesses, too, the influence of the vast social and political changes wrought by the war on the ultimate success of the campaign in 1918. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/rise-up-women aBook02567nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450080002152600034002953000023003295000033003525201413003855380036017986500014018346500030018486500031018786500024019096500022019336500029019557000034019847000032020187000030020508560116020809750009021969780203488515UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802034885158 a10.4324/9780203488515 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aRoutledge Handbook on the Global History of Nursingh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe Routledge Handbook on the Global History of Nursing brings together leading scholars and scholarship to capture the state of the art and science of nursing history, as a generation of researchers turn to the history of nursing with new paradigms and methodological tools. Inviting readers to consider new understandings of the historical work and worth of nursing in a larger global context, this ground-breaking volume illuminates how research into the history of nursing moves us away from a reductionist focus on diseases and treatments and towards more inclusive ideas about the experiences of illnesses on individuals, families, communities, voluntary organizations, and states at the bedside and across the globe. An extended introduction by the editors provides an overview and analyzes the key themes involved in the transmission of ideas about the care of the sick. Organized into four parts, and addressing nursing around the globe, it covers: - new directions in the history of nursing; - new methodological approaches; - the politics of nursing knowledge; - nursing and its relationship to social practice. Exploring themes of people, practice, politics, and places, this cutting-edge volume brings together the best of nursing history scholarship, and is a vital reference for all researchers in the field, and is also relevant to those studying on nursing history and health policy courses. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aD'Antonio, Patricia,eeditor.1 aFairman, Julie A.,eeditor.1 aWhelan, Jean C.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/routledge-handbook-on-the-global-history-of-nursing aBook02427nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000030002152450094002452600034003393000023003735000033003965201384004295380036018136500014018496500030018636500031018936500024019246500022019486500029019708560081019999750009020809780203104088UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031040888 a10.4324/9780203104088 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aHarrison, Brian,eauthor.10aSeparate Spheresh[electronic resource] :bThe Opposition to Women's Suffrage in Britain. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe British feminist movement has often been studied, but so far nobody has written about its opponents. Dr Harrison argues that British feminism cannot be understood without appreciating the strength and even the contemporary plausibility of 'the Antis', as the opponents of women's suffrage were called. In a fully documented approach which combines political with social history, he unravels the complex politics, medical, diplomatic and social components of the anti-suffrage mind, and clarifies the Antis' central commitment to the idea of separate but complementary spheres for the two sexes. Dr Harrison then analyses the history of organised anti-suffragism between 1908 and 1918, and argues that anti-suffragism is important for shedding light on the Edwardian feminists. The Antis also introduce us to important Victorian and Edwardian attitudes which are often forgotten and which differ markedly from the attitudes to women which are now familiar; on the other hand, his concluding chapter - which surveys the period from 1918 to 1978 - claims that many of these attitudes, though less frequently voiced in public, still influence present-day conduct. His book, published originally in 1978, therefore makes an important contribution towards the history of the British women's movement and towards understanding Britain in the nineteenth- and twentieth-centuries. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/separate-spheres aBook02280nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450093002152600034003083000023003425000033003655201134003985380036015326500014015686500030015826500031016126500024016436500022016676500029016897000032017187000028017507000035017788560096018139750009019099780203102404UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031024048 a10.4324/9780203102404 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSex and Class in Women's Historyh[electronic resource] :bEssays from Feminist Studies. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe essays collected in this volume reflect the upsurge of interest in the research and writing of feminist history in the 1970s/80s and illustrate the developments which have taken place - in the types of questions asked, the methodologies employed, and the scope and sophistication of the analytical approaches which have been adopted. Focusing on women in nineteenth-century Britain and America, this book includes work by scholars in both countries and takes its place in a long history of Anglo-American debate. The collection adopts 'the doubled vision of feminist theory', the view that it is the simultaneous operation of relations of class and of sex/gender that perpetuate both patriarchy and capitalism. This view informs a wide variety of contributions from 'Class and Gender in Victorian England', to 'Servants, Sexual Relations and the Risks of Illegitimacy', 'Free Black Women', 'The Power of Women's Networks', and 'Socialism, Feminism and Sexual Antagonism in the London Tailoring Trade'. Both the vigour and the urgency of scholarship infused with social aims can be clearly felt in the essays collected here. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aNewton, Judith L.,eeditor.1 aRyan, Mary P.,eeditor.1 aWalkowitz, Judith R.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/sex-and-class-in-womens-history aBook02007nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000027002152450071002422600034003133000023003475000033003705200953004035380036013566500014013926500030014066500031014366500024014676500022014916500029015137000026015428560080015689750009016489780203207307UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802032073078 a10.4324/9780203207307 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aHannam, June,eauthor.10aSocialist Womenh[electronic resource] :bBritain, 1880s to 1920s. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis fascinating new study examines the experiences of women involved in the socialist movement during its formative years in Britain and the active role they played in campaigning for the vote. By giving full attention to this much-neglected group of women, Socialist Women examines and challenges the orthodox views of labour and suffrage history. Torn between competing loyalties of gender, class and politics, socialist women did not have a fixed identity but a number of contested identities. June Hannam and Karen Hunt probe issues that created divisions between these women, as well as giving them the opportunity to act together. In three fascinating case studies they explore: - women's suffrage - women and internationalism - the politics of consumption. Believing above all that being a woman was vital to their politics, these individuals sought to develop a woman-focused theory of socialism and to put this new politics into practice. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHunt, Karen,eauthor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/socialist-women aBook02105nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000040002152450073002552600034003283000023003625000033003855201074004185380036014926500014015286500030015426500031015726500024016036500022016276500029016498560080016789750009017589780203081679UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802030816798 a10.4324/9780203081679 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aRichman, Isabelle Kinnard,eauthor.10aSojourner Truthh[electronic resource] :bProphet of Social Justice. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aAlthough Sojourner Truth was born into bondage and oppression, in liberation she emerged as a leader in the most radical causes of her era. She travelled the country as an outspoken and riveting presence, battling for the abolition of slavery and for women's suffrage. While her role in these movements has been well-documented, biographers have frequently overlooked the influence of religion in Truth's life. A participant in a number of the most significant religious movements of her day, including the Methodist Perfectionists, the Kingdom of Matthias, the Utopians, and the Spiritualists, Truth drew her notions of justice from religion. Sojourner Truth: Prophet of Social Justice provides a concise biography of this important figure, integrating her religious life in ways that shed light on Truth's work and the religious movements of her day. Accompanied by primary source documents including political records, speech transcripts, and selections from her autobiography, Richman's biography provides a rich and accessible narrative of Truth's life and legacy. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/sojourner-truth aBook02169nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000030002152450103002452600034003483000023003825000033004055201116004385380036015546500014015906500030016046500031016346500024016656500022016896500029017118560082017409750009018229781315758008UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813157580088 a10.4324/9781315758008 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aFerguson, Moira,eauthor.10aSubject to Othersh[electronic resource] :bBritish Women Writers and Colonial Slavery, 1670-1834. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFirst published in 1992, Subject to Others considers the intersection between late seventeenth- to early nineteenth-century British female writers and the colonial debate surrounding slavery and abolition. Beginning with an overview that sets the discussion in context, Moira Ferguson then chronicles writings by Anglo-Saxon women and one African-Caribbean ex-slave woman, from between 1670 and 1834, on the abolition of the slave trade and the emancipation of slaves. Through studying the writings of around thirty women in total, Ferguson concludes that white British women, as a result of their class position, religious affiliation and evolving conceptions of sexual difference, constructed a colonial discourse about Africans in general and slaves in particular. Crucially, the feminist propensity to align with anti-slavery activism helped to secure the political self-liberation of white British women. A fascinating and detailed text, this volume will be of particular interest to undergraduate students researching colonial British female writers, early feminist discourse, and the anti-slavery debate. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/subject-to-others aBook01618nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450078002152600034002933000023003275000033003505200588003835380036009716500014010076500030010216500031010516500024010826500022011066500029011287000030011578560084011879750009012719780203458273UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802034582738 a10.4324/9780203458273 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSuffer and Be Stillh[electronic resource] :bWomen in the Victorian Age. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFirst published in 1972, this book contains a collection of ten essays that document the feminine stereotypes that women fought against, and only partially erased, a hundred years ago. In an introductory essay, Martha Vicinus describes the perfect Victorian lady, showing that the ideal was a combination of sexual innocence, conspicuous consumption and worship of the family hearth. Indeed, this model in some form was the ideal of all classes as the perfect lady's only functions were marriage and procreation. The text offers a valuable insight into Victorian culture and society. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aVicinus, Martha,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/suffer-and-be-still aBook01330nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450056002152600034002713000023003055000033003285200317003615380036006786500014007146500030007286500031007586500024007896500022008136500029008357000027008648560092008919750009009839780203708828UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802037088288 a10.4324/9780203708828 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSuffrage and the Pankhurstsh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFirst published in 1987. This collection brings together important articles written by Emmeline Pankhurst and her daughters during the Suffragette Campaign, 1903-14. Includes a transcript of the 1908 trial of the suffragette leaders, their speeches, and major pamphlets of the Women's Social and Political Union. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMarcus, Jane,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/suffrage-and-the-pankhursts aBook01681nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000037002152450088002522600034003403000023003745000033003975200640004305380036010706500014011066500030011206500031011506500024011816500022012056500029012278560078012569750009013349780203427569UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802034275698 a10.4324/9780203427569 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aHolton, Sandra Stanley,eauthor.10aSuffrage Daysh[electronic resource] :bStories from the women's suffrage movement. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis is a history of the suffrage movement in Britain from the beginnings of the first sustained campaign in the 1860s to the winning of the vote for women in 1918. The book focuses on a number of figures whose role in this agitation has been ignored or neglected. These include the free-thinker Elizabeth Wolstenholme Elmy; the founder of the women's movement in the United States, Elizabeth Cady Stanton; the working class orator, Jessie Craigen; and the socialist suffragists, Hannah Mitchell and Mary Gawthorpe. Through the lives of these figures Holton uncovers the complex origins of the movement and associated issues of gender. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/suffrage-days aBook01986nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450069002152600034002843000023003185000033003415200968003745380036013426500014013786500030013926500031014226500024014536500022014776500029014997000030015288560081015589750009016399780203084847UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802030848478 a10.4324/9780203084847 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aTearing the Veilh[electronic resource] :bEssays on femininity. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis a collection of essays about women, by women, which examine the production of femininity within a patriarchal society. The essays show that characteristics generally considered to be 'feminine' are in fact cultural constructions within a patriarchal order. The patriarchal culture is taken by us to be a system of meanings, as well as power relations, which pervades our view of women at both a conscious and an unconscious level. The symbolism of the rituals, myths, art works and polemics examined in the essays is related to the ways women are psychically constructed and constrained by the dominant heterosexual order. The Mother, the Witch, the Whore, the Pure Woman, the Amazon and the Free Woman are considered and the contributors make extensive use of original source material to give force to the argument that the stereotypic view of a feminine woman as naturally and inevitably weak, passive and powerless is one that can be seriously challenged. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aLipshitz, Susan,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/tearing-the-veil aBook01390nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450103002152600034003183000023003525000033003755200336004085380036007446500014007806500030007946500031008246500024008556500022008796500029009017000028009308560085009589750009010439780203708958UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802037089588 a10.4324/9780203708958 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Education Papersh[electronic resource] :bWomen's Quest for Equality in Britain, 1850 - 1912. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFirst published in 1987, this volume makes available key documents, giving the contemporary reader a valuble record of women's struggle for eduacation in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. All of the women in this collection achieved significant reforms or struggled to change popular prejudices about women's education. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aSpender, Dale,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-education-papers aBook02622nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000033002152450100002482600034003483000023003825000033004055201566004385380036020046500014020406500030020546500031020846500024021156500022021396500029021618560085021909750009022759780203103616UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031036168 a10.4324/9780203103616 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aFranklin, Caroline,eauthor.10aThe Female Romanticsh[electronic resource] :bNineteenth-century Women Novelists and Byronism. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aAwarded the Elma Dangerfield Prize by the International Byron Society in 2013 The nineteenth century is sometimes seen as a lacuna between two literary periods. In terms of women's writing, however, the era between the death of Mary Wollstonecraft and the 1860s feminist movement produced a coherent body of major works, impelled by an ongoing dialogue between Enlightenment 'feminism' and late Romanticism. This study focuses on the dynamic interaction between Lord Byron and Madame de Sta©±l, Lady Morgan, Mary Shelley and Jane Austen, challenging previous critics' segregation of the male Romantic writers from their female peers. The Romantic movement in general unleashed the creative ambitions of nineteenth-century female novelists, and the public voice of Byron in particular engaged them in transnational issues of political, national and sexual freedom. Byronism had itself been shaped by the poet's incursion onto a literary scene where women readers were dominant and formidable intellectuals such as Madame de Sta©±l were lionized. Byron engaged in rivalrous dialogue with the novels of his female friends and contemporaries, such as Caroline Lamb, Mary Shelley and Jane Austen, whose critiques of Romantic egotism helped prompt his own self-parody in Don Juan. Later Victorian novelists, such as George Sand, the Bront©± sisters and Harriet Beecher Stowe, wove their rejection of their childhood attraction to Byronism, and their dawning awareness of the significance for women of Lady Byron's actions, into the feminist fabric of their art. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-female-romantics aBook02470nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000032002152450121002472600034003683000023004025000033004255201401004585380036018596500014018956500030019096500031019396500024019706500022019946500029020168560078020459750009021239780203098295UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802030982958 a10.4324/9780203098295 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aEvans, Richard J.,eauthor.10aThe Feministsh[electronic resource] :bWomen's Emancipation Movements in Europe, America and Australasia 1840-1920. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aOriginally published in 1977, this book brings together what is known about liberal feminist and socialist movements for the emancipation of women all over the world in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It deals not only with Britain and the United States but also with Australia, New Zealand, France, Germany, Russia, Austria-Hungary and the Scandinavian countries. The chapters trace the origins, development, and eventual collapse of these movements in relation to the changing social formations and political structures of Europe, America and Australasia in the era of bourgeois liberalism. The first part of the book discusses the origins of feminist movements and advances a model or 'ideal type' description of their development. The second part then takes a number of case studies of individual feminist movements to illustrate the main varieties of organised feminism and the differences from country to country. The third part looks at socialist women's movements and includes a study of the Socialist Women's International. A final part touches on the reason for the eclipse of women's emancipation movements in the half-century following the end of the First World War, before a general conclusion pulls together some of the arguments advanced in earlier chapters and attempts a comparison between these feminist movements of 1840-1920 and the Women's Liberation Movement. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-feminists aBook02368nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450119002152600034003343000023003685000033003915201281004245380036017056500014017416500030017556500031017856500024018166500022018406500029018627000029018918560101019209750009020219780203865392UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802038653928 a10.4324/9780203865392 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Great Rebellion of 1857 in Indiah[electronic resource] :bExploring transgressions, contests and diversities. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe Great Rebellion of 1857 in India was much more than a 'sepoy mutiny'. It was a major event in South Asian and British colonial history that significantly challenged imperialism in India. This fascinating collection explores hitherto ignored diversities of the Great Rebellion such as gender and colonial fiction, courtesans, white 'marginals', penal laws and colonial anxieties about the Mughals, even in exile. Also studied are popular struggles involving tribals and outcastes, and the way outcastes in the south of India locate the Rebellion. Interdisciplinary in focus and based on a range of untapped source materials and rare, printed tracts, this book questions conventional wisdom. The comprehensive introduction traces the different historiographical approaches to the Great Rebellion, including the imperialist, nationalist, marxist and subaltern scholarship. While questioning typical assumptions associated with the Great Rebellion, it argues that the Rebellion neither began nor ended in 1857 - 58. Clearly informed by the 'Subaltern Studies' scholarship, this book is post-subalternist as it moves far beyond narrow subalternist concerns. It will be of interest to students of Colonial and South Asian History, Social History, Cultural and Political Studies. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPati, Biswamoy,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-great-rebellion-of-1857-in-india aBook01438nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000030002152450089002452600034003343000023003685000033003915200357004245380036007816500014008176500030008316500031008616500024008926500022009166500029009388560124009679750009010919781315654010UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813156540108 a10.4324/9781315654010 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aMacDonald, Tara,eauthor.10aThe New Man, Masculinity and Marriage in the Victorian Novelh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aBy tracing the rise of the New Man alongside novelistic changes in the representations of marriage, MacDonald shows how this figure encouraged Victorian writers to reassess masculine behaviour and to re-imagine the marriage plot in light of wider social changes. She finds examples in novels by Dickens, Anne Bront©±, George Eliot and George Gissing. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-new-man-masculinity-and-marriage-in-the-victorian-novel aBook01637nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450092002152600034003073000023003415000033003645200545003975380036009426500014009786500030009926500031010226500024010536500022010776500029010997000029011287000028011578560093011859750009012789780203104118UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031041188 a10.4324/9780203104118 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Nineteenth-Century Womanh[electronic resource] :bHer Cultural and Physical World. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis collection of papers draws on insights from social anthropology to illuminate historical material, and presents a set of closely integrated studies on the inter-connections between feminism and medical, social and educational ideas in the nineteenth century. Throughout the book evidence from both the USA and UK shows that feminists had to operate in a restricting and complex social environment in which the concept of "the lady" and the ideal of the saintly mother defined the nineteenth-century woman's cultural and physical world. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aDelamont, Sara,eeditor.1 aDuffin, Lorna,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-nineteenth-century-woman aBook01538nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450101002152600034003163000023003505000033003735200440004065380036008466500014008826500030008966500031009266500024009576500022009816500029010037000028010327000030010608560089010909750009011799781315012995UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813150129958 a10.4324/9781315012995 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Non-Violent Militanth[electronic resource] :bSelected Writings of Teresa Billington-Greig. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFirst published in 1987. This volume collects together writings of Teresa Billington-Greig, suffragette, activist and political theorist. One of the first organizers for the Women's Social and Political Union, she was a founder-member of the Women's freedom League. She was also the first suffragette to be sent to Holloway Gaol. This volume provides new insights into this exceptional women's lifelong efforts in the woman's movement. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMcPhee, Carol,eeditor.1 aFitzgerald, Ann,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-non-violent-militant aBook02154nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000032002152450111002472600034003583000023003925000033004155201079004485380036015276500014015636500030015776500031016076500024016386500022016626500029016848560094017139750009018079780203383612UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802033836128 a10.4324/9780203383612 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aRichardson, Sarah,eauthor.10aThe Political Worlds of Womenh[electronic resource] :bGender and Politics in Nineteenth Century Britain. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aTraditional analyses of nineteenth-century politics have assigned women a peripheral role. By adopting a broader interpretation of political participation, the author identifies how middle-class women were able to contribute to political affairs in the nineteenth century. Examining the contribution that women made to British political life in the period 1800 - 1870 stimulates debates about gender and politics, the nature of authority and the definition of political culture. This volume examines female engagement in both traditional and unconventional political arenas, including female sociability, salons, child-rearing and education, health, consumption, religious reform and nationalism. Richardson focuses on middle-class women's social, cultural, intellectual and political authority, as implemented by a range of public figures and lesser-known campaigners. The activists discussed and their varying political, economic and religious backgrounds will demonstrate the significance of female interventions in shaping the political culture of the period and beyond. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-political-worlds-of-women aBook01210nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000028002152450097002432600034003403000023003745000033003975200118004305380036005486500014005846500030005986500031006286500024006596500022006836500029007058560129007349750009008639781315656168UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813156561688 a10.4324/9781315656168 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aAttwood, Nina,eauthor.10aThe Prostitute's Bodyh[electronic resource] :bRewriting Prostitution in Victorian Britain. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aAttwood examines Victorian attitudes to prostitution across a number of sources: medical, literary, pornographic. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-prostitutes-body-rewriting-prostitution-in-victorian-britain aBook01409nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000031002152450075002462600034003213000023003555000033003785200354004115380036007656500014008016500030008156500031008456500024008766500022009006500029009228560111009519750009010629781315655345UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813156553458 a10.4324/9781315655345 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aGreen, Stephanie,eauthor.10aThe Public Lives of Charlotte and Marie Stopesh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aCharlotte Stopes was the first woman in Scotland to get a university qualification. She devoted her life to studying Shakespeare and the promotion of women in public life. Though Charlotte is largely forgotten, her daughter Marie is well known. Green asserts that Marie's success can only be understood in relation to the achievements of her mother. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-public-lives-of-charlotte-and-marie-stopes aBook01304nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450067002152600034002823000023003165000033003395200229003725380036006016500014006376500030006516500031006816500024007126500022007366500029007587000025007877000031008128560102008439750009009459780203708941UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802037089418 a10.4324/9780203708941 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Radical Women's Press of the 1850sh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFirst published in 1991. The volume reprints excerpts from six radical feminist journals of this crucial decade: The Lily, the Genius of Liberty, the Pioneer and Women's Advocate, the Una, The Woman's advocate and The Sybil. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aRusso, Ann,eeditor.1 aKramarae, Cheris,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-radical-womens-press-of-the-1850s aBook01446nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450083002152600034002983000023003325000033003555200365003885380036007536500014007896500030008036500031008336500024008646500022008886500029009107000029009397000031009688560088009999750009010879780203708934UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802037089348 a10.4324/9780203708934 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Revolution in Wordsh[electronic resource] :bRighting Women, 1868 - 1871. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFirst published in 1990. The revolution is one of the most radical periodicals of the Western women's movement. Though it only lasted a few years, it drew considerable attention to the courage and eloquence of its editors and contributors. The volume presents a wide range of exerpts from the periodical, evoking the undeminished power of these women's voices. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aRakow, Lana F.,eeditor.1 aKramarae, Cheris,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-revolution-in-words aBook02340nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450093002152600034003083000023003425000033003655201234003985380036016326500014016686500030016826500031017126500024017436500022017676500029017897000030018187000027018488560106018759750009019819780203436868UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802034368688 a10.4324/9780203436868 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Routledge History of Sex and the Bodyh[electronic resource] :b1500 to the Present. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe Routledge History of Sex and the Body provides an overview of the main themes surrounding the history of sexuality from 1500 to the present day. The history of sex and the body is an expanding field in which vibrant debate on, for instance, the history of perversions is developing. This book examines the current scholarship and looks towards future directions for the field. The volume is divided into 14 thematic parts, which are split into two chronological chapters: 1500 - 1750 and 1750 to the present day. Focusing on the history of sexuality and the body in the West but also interactions with a broader globe, these thematic parts survey the major areas of debate and discussion. Covering themes such as science, identity, the gaze, courtship, reproduction, sexual violence and the importance of age and race, the volume offers a comprehensive view of the history of sex and the body. The book concludes with an afterword in which the reader is invited to consider some of the 'tensions, problems and areas deserving further scrutiny'. Including contributors renowned in their field of expertise, this ground-breaking collection is essential reading for all those interested in the history of sexuality and the body. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aToulalan, Sarah,eeditor.1 aFisher, Kate,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-routledge-history-of-sex-and-the-body aBook02730nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000040002152450078002552600034003333000023003675000033003905201687004235380036021106500014021466500030021606500031021906500024022216500022022456500029022678560087022969750009023839780203084823UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802030848238 a10.4324/9780203084823 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aRichards, Janet Radcliffe,eauthor.10aThe Sceptical Feministh[electronic resource] :bA philosophical enquiry. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aA systematic and original study of feminist issues, The Sceptical Feminist fights a battle on two fronts: against the view that little or nothing is wrong with women's position, and at the same time against much current feminist dogma. It is written by a philosopher who, in the tradition of John Stuart Mill's classic The Subjection of Women, avoids the psychological and sociological speculation characteristic of much recent feminism and concentrates on the analysis of arguments. By these means she constructs a powerful and often unexpected case for radical change in the position of women, as well as for a change of attitude among many feminists. From her analysis, Janet Radcliffe Richards argues that positive discrimination in favour of women is essential for justice, that traditional sexual roles never had anything to do with beliefs about each sex's capabilities, that current abortion practice reflects a disguised wish to punish women's sexual activity, that 'women's work' is rightly little valued, and that traditional ideals of femininity are inherently pernicious. But she also argues that a movement for sexual justice cannot 'take the woman's side in everything', that feminism should not be thought of as the primary struggle, that dismissing 'male' logic and science will undermine feminists' own intentions, that the state should not subsidise motherhood, that ever available cr©·ches would be disastrous for women, that there is no inherent degradation in prostitution, and that contempt for beauty and adornment has nothing to do with feminism. This is a book for feminists, for their critics, and for students of moral, political and social philosophy. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-sceptical-feminist aBook02261nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000029002152450087002442600034003313000023003655000033003885201187004215380036016086500014016446500030016586500031016886500024017196500022017436500029017658560120017949750009019149780203645765UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802036457658 a10.4324/9780203645765 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aMcDermid, Jane,eauthor.10aThe Schooling of Girls in Britain and Ireland, 1800 - 1900h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis book compares the formal education of the majority of girls in Britain and Ireland in the nineteenth century. Previous books about 'Britain' invariably focus on England, and such 'British' studies tend not to include Ireland despite its incorporation into the Union in 1801. The Schooling of Girls in Britain and Ireland, 1800-1900 presents a comparative synthesis of the schooling of working and middle-class girls in the Victorian period, with the emphasis on the interaction of gender, social class, religion and nationality across the UK. It reveals similarities as well as differences between both the social classes and the constituent parts of the Union, including strikingly similar concerns about whether working-class girls could fulfill their domestic responsibilities. What they had in common with middle-class girls was that they were to be educated for the good of others. This study shows how middle-class women used educational reform to carve a public role for themselves on the basis of a domesticated life for their lower class 'sisters', confirming that Victorian feminism was both empowering and constraining by reinforcing conventional gender stereotypes. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-schooling-of-girls-in-britain-and-ireland-1800-1900 aBook01267nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450050002152600034002653000023002995000033003225200262003555380036006176500014006536500030006676500031006976500024007286500022007526500029007747000031008038560086008349750009009209781315012971UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813150129718 a10.4324/9781315012971 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Sexuality Debatesh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFirst published in 1987. From the 1870's to the 1920's, feminists actively campaigned against men's sexual abuse of women. This collection brings together the major articles which fuelled the feminist campaigns and helped to bring about significant reforms. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aJeffreys, Sheila,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-sexuality-debates aBook01272nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450061002152600034002763000023003105000033003335200208003665380036005746500014006106500030006246500031006546500024006856500022007096500029007317000027007607000029007878560097008169750009009139781315476735UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813154767358 a10.4324/9781315476735 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Witlings and The Woman-Haterh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis edition contains two of Frances Burney's comedies: "The Witlings", (1778-80) which satirizes the bluestockings; and "The Woman Hater" (1800-02), which explores social pretension and gender conflict. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aSabor, Peter,eeditor.1 aSill, Geoffrey,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-witlings-and-the-woman-hater aBook02614nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000034002152450092002492600034003413000023003755000033003985201567004315380036019986500014020346500030020486500031020786500024021096500022021336500029021558560083021849750009022679780203102817UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031028178 a10.4324/9780203102817 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aO'Neill, William L.,eauthor.10aThe Woman Movementh[electronic resource] :bFeminism in the United States and England. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis unusual book traces the development of the feminist movement in America and, to a lesser extent, in England. The comparison between the movements is enlightening. Professor O'Neill starts with Mary Wollstonecraft and traces the development of the attack on Victorian institutions right up to the 1920s and on to the 'permissive' society in which we live. But the story covers all facets of the movement: the struggle for enfranchisement, for property rights, and education, for working women in industry, for temperance and social reform. These remarkable women leaders live in these pages, but even more in the Documents which form the second part of the book. Here their own voices come to us across the years with a sincerity which gives life to the language of a past age.This unusual book traces the development of the feminist movement in America and, to a lesser extent, in England. The comparison between the movements is enlightening. Professor O'Neill starts with Mary Wollstonecraft and traces the development of the attack on Victorian institutions right up to the 1920s and on to the 'permissive' society in which we live. But the story covers all facets of the movement: the struggle for enfranchisement, for property rights, and education, for working women in industry, for temperance and social reform. These remarkable women leaders live in these pages, but even more in the Documents which form the second part of the book. Here their own voices come to us across the years with a sincerity which gives life to the language of a past age. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-woman-movement aBook01909nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000028002152450102002432600034003453000023003795000033004025200805004355380036012406500014012766500030012906500031013206500024013516500022013756500029013978560136014269750009015629780203021101UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802030211018 a10.4324/9780203021101 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aJordan, Ellen,eauthor.10aThe Women's Movement and Women's Employment in Nineteenth Century Britainh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe author argues that the way femininity was defined in the first half of the century blinded employers in the new industries to the suitability of young female labour. This definition of femininity was, however, contested by certain women who argued that it not only denied women the full use of their talents but placed many of them in situations of economic insecurity. This was a particular concern of the Women's Movement in its early decades and their first response was a redefinition of femininity and the promotion of academic education for girls. The author demonstrates that as a result of these efforts, employers in the areas targeted began to see the advantages of employing young women, and young women were persuaded that working outside the home would not endanger their femininity. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-womens-movement-and-womens-employment-in-nineteenth-century-britain aBook02195nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000034002152450102002492600034003513000023003855000033004085201105004415380036015466500014015826500030015966500031016266500024016576500022016816500029017038560116017329750009018489780203390184UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802033901848 a10.4324/9780203390184 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aCrawford, Elizabeth,eauthor.10aThe Women's Suffrage Movement in Britain and Irelandh[electronic resource] :bA Regional Survey. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aIn this comprehensive study, Elizabeth Crawford provides the first survey of women's suffrage campaigns across the British Isles and Ireland, focusing on local campaigns and activists. Through a study of the grass roots activists Crawford provides a counter to studies of the movement that have focused on the politics and personalities that dominated at a national level. Attempts to involve women of all classes at a local level were highly successful and, uniquely, Crawford also shows the extent of male support across the provinces. Such support was fundamental to the success of the suffrage movement. Including a thorough inventory of archival sources and extensive bibliographical and biographical references for each region, including the addresses of campaigners, this guide is essential for researchers, scholars, local historians and students alike. Divided into thirteen sections covering ten regions of England, together with Wales, Scotland and Ireland, this book gives a unique geographical dimension to debates on the suffrage campaign of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/the-womens-suffrage-movement-in-britain-and-ireland aBook02259nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000029002152450159002442600034004033000023004375000033004605201152004935380036016456500014016816500030016956500031017256500024017566500022017806500029018028560081018319750009019129781315363417UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813153634178 a10.4324/9781315363417 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aDemoor, Marysa,eauthor.10aTheir Fair Shareh[electronic resource] :bWomen, Power and Criticism in the Athenaeum, from Millicent Garett Fawcett to Katherine Mansfield, 1870 - 1920. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aTheir Fair Share identifies and contextualises many previously unknown critical writings by a selection of well-known turn-of-the-century women. It reveals the networks behind an influential journal like the Athenaeum and presents a more shaded assessment of its position in the field of cultural production, in the period 1870-1920. The Athenaeum (1828-1921) has often been presented as a monolithic institution offering its readers a fairly conservative, male oriented appreciation of a wide variety of contemporary publications. On the basis of archival and biographical material this book presents an entirely new analysis of the reviewing policy of this weekly from 1870, when it came into the hands of the politician Sir Charles Wentworth Dilke, up to and including 1919-1920 when John Middleton Murry became its editor. Dilke, and his editor Norman MacColl, are here revealed to have been committed feminists who enlisted some of the most influential women of their time as critics for their journal. The book looks more specifically at the contributions by, a.o., Millicent Garrett Fawcett, Emilia Dilke, Jane Harrison and Augusta Webster. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/their-fair-share aBook02110nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000029002152450094002442600034003383000023003725000033003955201058004285380036014866500014015226500030015366500031015666500024015976500022016216500029016438560091016729750009017639780203449325UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802034493258 a10.4324/9780203449325 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aLokke, Kari E.,eauthor.10aTracing Women's Romanticismh[electronic resource] :bGender, history, and transcendence. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis book explores a cosmopolitan tradition of nineteenth-century novels written in response to Germaine de Sta©±l's originary novel of the artist as heroine, corinne. The first book to delineate the contours of an international women's Romanticism, it argues that the k©ơnstlerromane of Mary Shelley, Bettine von Arnim, and George Sand offer feminist understandings of history and transcendence that constitute a critique of Romanticism from within. The book examines meditative, mystical and utopian visions of religious and artistic transcendence in the novels of women Romanticists as vehicles for the representation of a gendered subjectivity that seeks detachment and distance from the interests and strictures of the existing patriarchal social and cultural order. For these writers, the author argues, self-transcendence means an abandonment or dissolution of the individual self through political and spiritual efforts that culminate in a revelation of the divinity of a collective selfhood that comes into being through historical process. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/tracing-womens-romanticism aBook02612nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000034002152450121002492600034003703000023004045000033004275201526004605380036019866500014020226500030020366500031020666500024020976500022021216500029021438560093021729750009022659780203723654UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802037236548 a10.4324/9780203723654 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aSteinbach, Susie L.,eauthor.10aUnderstanding the Victoriansh[electronic resource] :bPolitics, Culture, and Society in Nineteenth-Century Britain. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe Victorian era was a time of dramatic change. During this period Britain ruled the largest empire on earth, witnessed the expansion of democracy, and developed universal education and mass print culture. Both its imperial might and the fact that it had industrialized and urbanized decades before any other nation allowed it to dominate world politics and culture in many ways for the better part of the nineteenth century. Understanding the Victorians paints a vivid portrait of the era, combining broad survey with close analysis, and introduces students to the critical debates taking place among historians today. It encompasses all of Great Britain and Ireland over the whole of the Victorian period, giving prominence to social and cultural topics alongside politics and economics and emphasizing class, gender, and racial and imperial positioning as constitutive of human relations. Starting with the Queen Caroline Affair in 1820 and coming right up to the start of World War I in 1914, Susie L. Steinbach uses thematic chapters to discuss and evaluate politics, imperialism, the economy, class, gender, the monarchy, arts and entertainment, religion, sexuality, and science. Steinbach also provides three much-needed chapters on topics rarely covered at this introductory level on space, consumption, and the law. With a clear introduction outlining the key themes of the period, a detailed timeline, and suggestions for further reading, this is the ideal companion for all students of the nineteenth century. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/understanding-the-victorians aBook02533nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000030002152450094002452600034003393000023003735000033003965201482004295380036019116500014019476500030019616500031019916500024020226500022020466500029020688560089020979750009021869780203120538UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031205388 a10.4324/9780203120538 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aFoster, Shirley,eauthor.10aVictorian Women's Fictionh[electronic resource] :bMarriage, Freedom and the Individual. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFocusing on the ways in which female novelists have, in their creative work, challenged or scrutinised contemporary assumptions about their own sex, this book's critical interest in women's fiction shows how mid-nineteenth-century women writers confront the conflict between the pressures of matrimonial ideologies and the often more attractive alternative of single or professional life. In arguing that the tensions and dualities of their work represent the honest confrontation of their own ambivalence rather than attempted conformity to convention, it calls for a fresh look at patterns of imaginative representation in Victorian women's literature. Making extensive use of letters and non-fiction, this study relates the opinions expressed there to the themes and methods of the fictional narratives. The first chapter outlines the social and ideological framework within which the authors were writing; the subsequent five chapters deal with the individual novelists, Craik, Charlotte Bront©♭, Sewell, Gaskell, and Eliot, examining the works of each and also pointing to the similarities between them, thus suggesting a shared female 'voice'. Dealing with minor writers as well as better-known figures, it opens up new areas of critical investigation, claiming not only that many nineteenth-century female novelists have been undeservedly neglected but also that the major ones are further illuminated by being considered alongside their less familiar contemporaries. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/victorian-womens-fiction aBook01994nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000032002152450075002472600034003223000023003565000033003795200965004125380036013776500014014136500030014276500031014576500024014886500022015126500029015348560084015639750009016479781315646404UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813156464048 a10.4324/9781315646404 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aBarrett, Dorothea,eauthor.10aVocation and Desireh[electronic resource] :bGeorge Eliot's Heroines. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFirst published in 1989. Generations of critics have seen George Eliot as a conservative Victorian high moralist and sybil. Vocation and Desire questions that image, and finds in her work elements of anger, feminism, subversiveness, revenge, iconoclasm, wit, and eroticism - elements that we have been taught not to expect. After looking at the development of the sybilline image and the gradual eclipse of the subversive George Eliot - which Eliot herself initiated - Dorothea Barrett goes on to investigate the evidence of the novels themselves and finds an alternative emphasis. Her study of the heroines of the six major novels and issues of language and desire provides a refreshing and acute analysis of the contradictions and strengths of Eliot's work. She also considers the reception of George Eliot by feminist critics and the broader implications of her work for contemporary feminism. This title will be of interest to students of literature. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/vocation-and-desire aBook02751nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000033002152450140002482600034003883000023004225000033004455201615004785380036020936500014021296500030021436500031021736500024022046500022022286500029022508560125022799750009024049781315317748UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813153177488 a10.4324/9781315317748 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aComitini, Patricia,eauthor.10aVocational Philanthropy and British Women's Writing, 1790 - 1810h[electronic resource] :bWollstonecraft, More, Edgeworth, Wordsworth. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPatricia Comitini's study compels serious rethinking of how literature by women in the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries should be read. Beginning with a description of the ways in which evolving conceptions of philanthropy were foundational to constructions of class and gender roles, Comitini argues that these changes enabled a particular kind of feminine benevolence that was linked to women's work as writers. The term 'vocational philanthropy' is suggestive of the ways that women used their status as professional writers to instruct men and women in changing gender relations, and to educate the middling and laboring classes in their new roles during a socially and economically turbulent era. Examining works by Hannah More, Mary Wollstonecraft, Maria Edgeworth, and Dorothy Wordsworth, whose writing crosses generic, political, and social boundaries, Comitini shows how women from diverse backgrounds shared a commitment to philanthropy - fostering the love of mankind - and an interest in the social nature of literacy. Their writing fosters sentiments that they hoped would be shared between the sexes and among the classes in English society, forging new reading audiences among women and the lower classes. These writers and their writing exemplify the paradigm of vocational philanthropy, which gives people not money, but texts to read, in order to imagine societal improvement. The effect was to permit the emergence of middle-class values linking private notions of morality, family, and love to the public needs for good citizens, industrious laborers, and class consolidation. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/vocational-philanthropy-and-british-womens-writing-1790-1810 aBook01523nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450044002152600034002593000023002935000033003165200485003495380036008346500014008706500030008846500031009146500024009456500022009696500029009917000027010207000037010478560080010849750009011649780203006443UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802030064438 a10.4324/9780203006443 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aVotes for Womenh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aIn the first half of the nineteenth century the main employment open to young women in Britain was in teaching, dressmaking, textile manufacture and domestic service. After 1850, however, young women began to enter previously all-male areas like medicine, pharmacy, librarianship, the civil service, clerical work and hairdressing, or areas previously restricted to older women like nursing, retail work and primary school teaching. This book examines the reasons for this change. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPurvis, June,eeditor.1 aHolton, Sandra Stanley,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/votes-for-women aBook01418nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000026002152450087002412600034003283000023003625000033003855200349004185380036007676500014008036500030008176500031008476500024008786500022009026500029009248560118009539750009010719781315655710UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813156557108 a10.4324/9781315655710 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aRegan, Lisa,eauthor.10aWinifred Holtby's Social Visionh[electronic resource] :bMembers One of Another'. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aWinifred Holtby (1898-1935) is best-known today for her friendship with fellow feminist and pacifist Vera Brittain and for her last novel, South Riding. This is the first monograph to provide a literary criticism of Holtby's social philosophy and presents in-depth readings of all her major works as well as some of her less well-known writing. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/winifred-holtbys-social-vision-members-one-of-another aBook02564nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000029002152450088002442600034003323000023003665000033003895201523004225380036019456500014019816500030019956500031020256500024020566500022020806500029021028560086021319750009022179780203645314UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802036453148 a10.4324/9780203645314 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aMidgley, Clare,eauthor.10aWomen Against Slaveryh[electronic resource] :bThe British Campaigns, 1780 - 1870. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis comprehensive study of women anti-slavery campaigners fills a serious gap in abolitionist history. Covering all stages of the campaign, Women Against Slavery uses hitherto neglected sources to build up a vivid picture of the lives, words and actions of the women who were involved, and their distinctive contribution to the abolitionist movement. It looks at the way women's participation influenced the organisation, activities, policy and ideology of the campaign, and analyses the impact of female activism on women's own attitudes to their social roles, and their participation in public life. Exploring the vital role played by gender in shaping the movement as a whole, this book makes an important contribution to the debate on - race' and gender.This comprehensive study of women anti-slavery campaigners fills a serious gap in abolitionist history. Covering all stages of the campaign, Women Against Slavery uses hitherto neglected sources to build up a vivid picture of the lives, words and actions of the women who were involved, and their distinctive contribution to the abolitionist movement. It looks at the way women's participation influenced the organisation, activities, policy and ideology of the campaign, and analyses the impact of female activism on women's own attitudes to their social roles, and their participation in public life. Exploring the vital role played by gender in shaping the movement as a whole, this book makes an important contribution to the debate on - race' and gender. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-against-slavery aBook01838nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000027002152450077002422600034003193000023003535000033003765200783004095380036011926500014012286500030012426500031012726500024013036500022013276500029013498560113013789750009014919780203401958UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802034019588 a10.4324/9780203401958 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aPerkin, Joan,eauthor.10aWomen and Marriage in Nineteenth-Century Englandh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe 'bonds of matrimony' describes with cruel precision the social and political status of married women in the nineteenth century. Women of all classes had only the most limited rights of possession in their own bodies and property yet, as this remarkable book shows, women of all classes found room to manoeuvre within the narrow limits imposed on them. Upper-class women frequently circumvented the onerous limitations of the law, while middle-class women sought through reform to change their legal status. For working-class women, such legal changes were irrelevant, but they too found ways to ameliorate their position. Joan Perkin demonstrates clearly in this outstanding book, full of human insights, that women were not content to remain inferior or subservient to men. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-and-marriage-in-nineteenth-century-england aBook01505nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000032002152450078002472600034003253000023003595000033003825200443004155380036008586500014008946500030009086500031009386500024009696500022009936500029010158560114010449750009011589780203193365UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031933658 a10.4324/9780203193365 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aMorgan, Rosemarie,eauthor.10aWomen and Sexuality in the Novels of Thomas Hardyh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aRosemary Morgan provides challenging reading arguing that, contrary to the accepted critical view, Hardy's heroines do seek control over their conduct and their destinies and this reveals itself in rebellious sexuality.Rosemary Morgan provides challenging reading arguing that, contrary to the accepted critical view, Hardy's heroines do seek control over their conduct and their destinies and this reveals itself in rebellious sexuality. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-and-sexuality-in-the-novels-of-thomas-hardy aBook02257nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000032002152450058002472600034003053000023003395000033003625201235003955380036016306500014016666500030016806500031017106500024017416500022017656500029017878560094018169750009019109781315838076UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813158380768 a10.4324/9781315838076 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aGrayzel, Susan R.,eauthor.10aWomen and the First World Warh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe First World War was the first modern, total war, one requiring the mobilisation of both civilians and combatants. Particularly in Europe, the main theatre of the conflict, this war demanded the active participation of both men and women. Women and the First World War provides an introduction to the experiences and contributions of women during this important turning point in history. In addition to exploring women's relationship to the war in each of the main protagonist states, the book also looks at the wide-ranging effects of the war on women in Africa Asia, Australia, New Zealand, and North America. Topical in its approach, the book highlights: the heated public debates about women's social, cultural and political roles that the war inspired their varied experiences of war women's representation in propaganda their roles in peace movements and revolutionary activity that grew out of the war the consequences of the war for women in its immediate aftermath Containing a document section providing a wide range of sources from first-hand accounts, a Chronology and Glossary, Women and the First World War is an ideal text for students studying the First World War or the role of women in the twentieth century. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-and-the-first-world-war aBook02336nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000028002152450130002432600034003733000023004075000033004305201255004635380036017186500014017546500030017686500031017986500024018296500022018536500029018758560085019049750009019899781315318028UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813153180288 a10.4324/9781315318028 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aRogers, Helen,eauthor.10aWomen and the Peopleh[electronic resource] :bAuthority, Authorship and the Radical Tradition in Nineteenth-Century England. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aBased on extensive new research investigating the range of women's involvement in early nineteenth-century popular politics, mid-Victorian reform and the women's movements of the late century, Women and the People makes an original intervention in the historiography of the radical tradition by exploring the interconnections of populism, liberalism and feminism. Attending to authorship, the study argues that the representational forms adopted by radicals were as important as the content of what they said in shaping their self-perception, their construction of others, and the reception of their ideas. In fiction, poetry and autobiography, as well as in political writing, speeches and journalism, women reworked radical conventions and imagined new models of political identity, participation and authority. Though, in general, radicals appealed to 'the people', women were often positioned as the suffering objects of reform rather than as the agents of change. By showing how they challenged or reinforced these conceptions of 'women' and 'the people', the book contends that radical women invoked alternative communities of sex, class and nation, and helped to remake and discipline the political sphere, as they strove to make it their own. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-and-the-people aBook02188nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450093002152600034003083000023003425000033003655201042003985380036014406500014014766500030014906500031015206500024015516500022015756500029015977000029016267000032016557000034016878560096017219750009018179780203885994UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802038859948 a10.4324/9780203885994 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen and their Money 1700 - 1950h[electronic resource] :bEssays on women and finance. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis book examines women's financial activity from the early days of the stock market in eighteenth century England and the South Sea Bubble to the mid-twentieth century. The essays demonstrate how many women managed their own finances despite legal and social restrictions and show that women were neither helpless, incompetent and risk-averse, nor were they unduly cautious and conservative. Rather, many women learnt about money and made themselves effective and engaged managers of the funds at their disposal. The essays focus on Britain, from eighteenth-century London, to the expansion of British financial markets of the nineteenth century, with comparative essays dealing with the US, Italy, Sweden and Japan. Hitherto, writing about women and money has been restricted to their management of household finances or their activities as small business women. This book examines the clear evidence of women's active engagement in financial matters, much neglected in historical literature, especially women's management of capital. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aLaurence, Anne,eeditor.1 aMaltby, Josephine,eeditor.1 aRutterford, Janette,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-and-their-money-1700-1950 aBook03061nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000030002152450065002452600034003103000023003445000033003675202027004005380036024276500014024636500030024776500031025076500024025386500022025626500029025848560101026139750009027149780203088340UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802030883408 a10.4324/9780203088340 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aHolloway, Gerry,eauthor.10aWomen and Work in Britain since 1840h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe first book of its kind to study this period, Gerry Holloway's essential student resource works chronologically from the early 1840s to the end of the twentieth century and examines over 150 years of women's employment history. With suggestions for research topics, an annotated bibliography to aid further research, and a chronology of important events which places the subject in a broader historical context, Gerry Holloway considers how factors such as class, age, marital status, race and locality, along with wider economic and political issues, have affected women's job opportunities and status. Key themes and issues that run through the book include: - continuity and change - the sexual division of labour - women as a cheap labour force - women's perceived primary role of motherhood - women and trade unions - equality and difference - education and training. Students of women's studies, gender studies and history will find this a fascinating and invaluable addition to their reading material.The first book of its kind to study this period, Gerry Holloway's essential student resource works chronologically from the early 1840s to the end of the twentieth century and examines over 150 years of women's employment history. With suggestions for research topics, an annotated bibliography to aid further research, and a chronology of important events which places the subject in a broader historical context, Gerry Holloway considers how factors such as class, age, marital status, race and locality, along with wider economic and political issues, have affected women's job opportunities and status. Key themes and issues that run through the book include: - continuity and change - the sexual division of labour - women as a cheap labour force - women's perceived primary role of motherhood - women and trade unions - equality and difference - education and training. Students of women's studies, gender studies and history will find this a fascinating and invaluable addition to their reading material. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-and-work-in-britain-since-1840 aBook02048nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000031002152450084002462600034003303000023003645000033003875200963004205380036013836500014014196500030014336500031014636500024014946500022015186500029015407000030015698560090015999750009016899781315800301UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813158003018 a10.4324/9781315800301 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aElliott, Bridget,eauthor.10aWomen Artists and Writersh[electronic resource] :bModernist (im)positionings. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aIn this provocative and richly interdisciplinary study Bridget Elliott and Jo-Ann Wallace reappraise the literary and artistic contribution of women to modernism and in particular the self representation and construction of artistic identity. Taking a comparative case study approach, the authors examine the ways in which women, including Natalie Barney, Virginia Woolf, Vanessa Bell and Gertrude Stein responded to modernism, and the manner in which their work has been positioned in relation to that of men. Women Artists and Writers makes an important contribution to twentieth-century cultural history, and puts forward a powerful case against the academic 'disciplining' of cultural production into departments of Art History and English Studies which has served to marginalize the work of female modernists. This book will be essential reading for all women's studies specialists and anyone interested in the cultural production of art and literature. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aWallace, Jo-Ann,eauthor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-artists-and-writers aBook01412nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000029002152450069002442600034003133000023003475000033003705200332004035380036007356500014007716500030007856500031008156500024008466500022008706500029008927000028009218560104009499750009010539780203029015UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802030290158 a10.4324/9780203029015 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aDoughan, David,eauthor.10aWomen, Clubs and Associations in Britainh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aEllen Jordan's treatment of the expansion of middle class women's work is perhaps the most comprehensive available and is a valuable complement to existing works on the social and economic history of women. She also offers new perspectives on the Women's Movement, women's education, labour history and the history of feminism. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aGordon, Peter,eauthor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-clubs-and-associations-in-britain aBook02770nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450089002152600034003043000023003385000033003615201650003945380036020446500014020806500030020946500031021246500024021556500022021796500029022017000026022307000034022568560121022909750009024119780203851852UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802038518528 a10.4324/9780203851852 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen, Gender and Religious Cultures in Britain, 1800 - 1940h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis volume is the first comprehensive overview of women, gender and religious change in modern Britain spanning from the evangelical revival of the early 1800s to interwar debates over women's roles and ministry. This collection of pieces by key scholars combines cross-disciplinary insights from history, gender studies, theology, literature, religious studies, sexuality and postcolonial studies. The book takes a thematic approach, providing students and scholars with a clear, comprehensive and comparative examination of ten significant areas of cultural activity that both shaped, and were shaped by, women's religious beliefs and practices: family life, literary and theological discourses, philanthropic networks, sisterhoods and deaconess institutions, revivals and preaching ministry, missionary organisations, national and transnational political reform networks, sexual ideas and practices, feminist communities, and alternative spiritual traditions. Chapters survey the existing scholarship and identify new research trajectories. They are framed by an introduction and afterword that reflect on the implications of the resurging interest in religion and spirituality for gender and women's history. Together, the volume challenges widely-held truisms about the increasingly private and domesticated nature of faith, the feminisation of religion and the relationship between secularisation and modern life. Including case studies, further reading lists and with a British rather than Anglo-centric approach, this is an ideal book for anyone interested in women's religious experiences across the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMorgan, Sue,eeditor.1 adeVries, Jacqueline,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-gender-and-religious-cultures-in-britain-1800-1940 aBook02161nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000031002152450055002462600034003013000023003355000033003585201146003915380036015376500014015736500030015876500031016176500024016486500022016726500029016948560091017239750009018149780203103128UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031031288 a10.4324/9780203103128 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aBranca, Patricia,eauthor.10aWomen in Europe Since 1750h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aIn dealing with the common experience of women in modern society, this book provides a deeper insight into European women at work, at home, at leisure and in their political and educational functions. Particular emphasis is placed upon the significant cultural differences between women of various classes and nationalities. The first chapters of the book trace the growing importance of women's work in the economic sector and for modernisation in general. Data from a wide variety of sources, including census figures, government and labour reports and personal accounts, illustrate that women have integrated work roles into a complex life style. The new image of women in society is analysed in the light of the numerous educational, political and legal reforms which took place in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century and the impact of feminist ideology is discussed in relation to this. In its overall presentation this book, first published in 1978, illustrates the importance of the history of women not only for an understanding of the female experience but also the process of modernisation in Western Europe in general. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-in-europe-since-1750 aBook02346nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450097002152600034003123000023003465000033003695201237004025380036016396500014016756500030016896500031017196500024017506500022017746500029017967000035018257000027018608560100018879750009019879780203795651UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802037956518 a10.4324/9780203795651 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen in Higher Education, 1850 - 1970h[electronic resource] :bInternational Perspectives. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis edited collection illustrates how women's lived experiences in academe could be diverse but in some ways historically and culturally similar. It looks at both the micro-level (individual women) and macro-level (universities and higher education systems) within community, regional, national, transnational, and international contexts. The contributors integrally advance knowledge about the university in history by exploring the intersections of the lived experiences of women students and professors, practices of coeducation, and intellectual and academic cultures. Important questions are raised about the complementary and multidirectional flow and exchange of academic knowledge and information among gender groups across programs, disciplines, and universities. Critical historical inquiry and interpretation effectively promote understandings of contemporary events and discourses in higher education, and more broadly in community and society. This book provides important historical contexts for current debates about the impact and significance of women in higher education, and the tensions embedded in the gendering of specific academic programs and disciplines, and in university policies, missions, and mandates. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPanayotidis, E. Lisa,eeditor.1 aStortz, Paul,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-in-higher-education-1850-1970 aBook02162nam a2200373Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450103002152600034003183000023003525000033003755200982004085380036013906500014014266500030014406500031014706500024015016500022015256500029015477000030015767000027016067000031016337000032016648560083016969750009017799781315741727UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813157417278 a10.4324/9781315741727 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen in Magazinesh[electronic resource] :bResearch, Representation, Production and Consumption. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aWomen have been important contributors to and readers of magazines since the development of the periodical press in the nineteenth century. By the mid-twentieth century, millions of women read the weeklies and monthlies that focused on supposedly 'feminine concerns' of the home, family and appearance. In the decades that followed, feminist scholars criticised such publications as at best conservative and at worst regressive in their treatment of gender norms and ideals. However, this perspective obscures the heterogeneity of the magazine industry itself and women's experiences of it, both as readers and as journalists. This collection explores such diversity, highlighting the differing and at times contradictory images and understandings of women in a range of magazines and women's contributions to magazines in a number of contexts from late nineteenth century publications to twenty-first century titles in Britain, North America, continental Europe and Australia. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aRitchie, Rachel,eeditor.1 aHawkins, Sue,eeditor.1 aPhillips, Nicola,eeditor.1 aKleinberg, S. Jay,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-in-magazines aBook01722nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000032002152450076002472600034003233000023003575000033003805200694004135380036011076500014011436500030011576500031011876500024012186500022012426500029012648560082012939750009013759780203436141UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802034361418 a10.4324/9780203436141 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aRowbotham, Sheila,eauthor.10aWomen in Movementh[electronic resource] :bFeminism and Social Action. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFirst published in 1992, this book is an historical introduction to a wide range of women's movements from the late eighteenth-century to the date of its publication. It describes economic, social and political ideas which have inspired women to organize, not only in Europe and North America, but also in the Third World. Sheila Rowbotham outlines a long history of women's challenges to the gender bias in political and economical concepts. She shows women laying claim to rights and citizenship, while contesting male definitions of their scope, and seeking to enlarge the meaning of economy through action around consumption and production, environmental protests and welfare projects. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-in-movement aBook02304nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000031002152450101002462600034003473000023003815000033004045201244004375380036016816500014017176500030017316500031017616500024017926500022018166500029018388560090018679750009019579780203104064UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031040648 a10.4324/9780203104064 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aHollis, Patricia,eauthor.10aWomen in Public 1850-1900h[electronic resource] :bDocuments of the Victorian Women's Movement. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aAssembling a full and comprehensive collection of material which illustrates all aspects of the emergent women's movement during the years 1850-1900, this fascinating book will prove invaluable to students of nineteenth century social history and women's studies, to those studying the Victorian novel and to sociologists. Women's pamphlets and speeches, parliamentary debates and popular journalism, letters and memoirs, royal commissions and the leading reviews, are all used to document the conflicting images of women: 'surplus women' and the issue of emigration; women's work and male hostility to it; the opening of education by Emily Davies; the claim to equity at law; the attack on the sexual double standard, led by Josephine Butler; women's public service from philanthropy - exemplified in a Mary Carpenter or Louisa Twining or Octavia Hill - to local government; and finally women's entry into politics led by Lydia Becker. The contents range from Caroline Norton on her battle for child custody in the 1830s to Annie Besant's inspiration of the match-girl's strike in 1888, and from W. T. Stead on child prostitution to Mrs Humphrey War's Appeal against female suffrage in 1889. The book was originally published in 1979. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-in-public-1850-1900 aBook02345nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450098002152600034003133000023003475000033003705201203004035380036016066500014016426500030016566500031016866500024017176500022017416500029017637000029017927000029018217000029018508560095018799750009019749781315626802UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813156268028 a10.4324/9781315626802 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen in Transnational Historyh[electronic resource] :bConnecting the local and the global. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aWomen in Transnational History offers a range of fresh perspectives on the field of women's history, exploring how cross-border connections and global developments since the nineteenth century have shaped diverse women's lives and the gendered social, cultural, political and economic histories of specific localities. The book is divided into three thematically organised parts, covering gendered histories of transnational networks, women's agency in the intersecting histories of imperialisms and nationalisms and the concept of localizing the global and globalizing the local. Discussing a broad spectrum of topics, from the politics of dress in Philippine mission stations in the early twentieth century to the shifting food practices of British women during the Second World War, the chapters bring women to the centre of the writing of new transnational histories. Illustrated with images and figures, this book throws new light on key global themes from the perspective of women's and gender history. Written by an international team of editors and contributors, it is a valuable and timely resource for students and researchers of both women's history and transnational and global history. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMidgley, Clare,eeditor.1 aTwells, Alison,eeditor.1 aCarlier, Julie,eauthor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-in-transnational-history aBook01379nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000035002152450088002502600034003383000023003725000033003955200291004285380036007196500014007556500030007696500031007996500024008306500022008546500029008767000028009058560087009339750009010209781315698090UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813156980908 a10.4324/9781315698090 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aHughes, Sarah Shaver,eauthor.10aWomen in World Historyh[electronic resource] :bReadings from 1500 to the Present. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis work is one of two volumes presenting selected histories from Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas. It discusses issues within a female context and features political and economic issues, marriage practices, motherhood and enslavement, religious beliefs and spiritual development. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHughes, Brady,eauthor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-in-world-history aBook02471nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000030002152450130002452600034003753000023004095000033004325201343004655380036018086500014018446500030018586500031018886500024019196500022019436500029019658560130019949750009021249781315317625UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813153176258 a10.4324/9781315317625 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aDenney, Colleen,eauthor.10aWomen, Portraiture and the Crisis of Identity in Victorian Englandh[electronic resource] :bMy Lady Scandalous Reconsidered. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aExploring the concept of portrait as memoir, Women, Portraiture and the Crisis of Identity in Victorian England: My Lady Scandalous Reconsidered examines the images and lives of four prominent Victorian women who steered their way through scandal to forge unique identities. The volume shows the effect of celebrity, and even notoriety, on the lives of Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Lady Dilke, Millicent Garrett Fawcett, and Sarah Grand. For these women, their portraits were more than speaking likenesses-whether painted or photographic, they became crucial tools the women used to negotiate their controversial identities. Women, Portraiture and the Crisis of Identity in Victorian England shows that the fascinating power of celebrity - and specifically its effects on women - was as much of a phenomenon in Victorian times as it is today. Colleen Denney explores how these women used their portraits as tools of persuasion, performing a domestic masquerade to secure privacy and acceptance, or sites of resistance, tearing down male constructions of female propriety and fighting Victorian stereotypes of intellectual women. Questioning the classic Victorian notions of "separate spheres," this volume celebrates women's search for self within the constraints of the nineteenth century, as well as within the world of present-day academia. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-portraiture-and-the-crisis-of-identity-in-victorian-england aBook02076nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000036002152450109002512600034003603000023003945000033004175201002004505380036014526500014014886500030015026500031015326500024015636500022015876500029016098560091016389750009017299780203084793UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802030847938 a10.4324/9780203084793 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aNewton, Judith Lowder,eauthor.10aWomen, Power and Subversionh[electronic resource] :bSocial Strategies in British Fiction, 1778 - 1860. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFirst published in 1981, this book explores the reactions of some female writers to the social effects of industrial capitalism between 1778 and 1860. The period set in motion a crisis over the status of middle-class women that culminated in the constructed idea of "women's proper sphere". This concept disguised inequities between men and women, first by asserting the reality of female power, and then by restricting it to self-sacrificing influence. In this book, Judith Newton analyses novels such as Fanny Burney's Evelina, Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, Charlotte Bront©±'s Villette and George Eliot's The Mill on the Floss in order to demonstrate how some female writers reacted to the issue by covertly resisting inequities of power and reconciling ideologies in their art. She argues that in this time period, novels became increasingly rebellious as well as ambivalent. Heroines were endowed with power, and emphasis was given to female ability, rather than to feminine influence. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-power-and-subversion aBook02246nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450093002152600034003083000023003425000033003655201200003985380036015986500014016346500030016486500031016786500024017096500022017336500029017557000028017848560087018129750009018999780203104026UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031040268 a10.4324/9780203104026 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen, Work and Protesth[electronic resource] :bA century of US women's labor history. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aAs paid work becomes increasingly central in women's lives, the history of their labor struggles assumes more and more importance. This volume represents the best of the new feminist scholarship in twentieth-century U.S. women's labor history. Fourteen original essays illuminate the complex relationship between gender, consciousness and working-class activism, and deepen historical understanding of the contradictory legacy of trade unionism for women workers. The contributors take up a wide range of specific subjects, and write from diverse theoretical perspectives. Some of the essays are case studies of women's participation in individual unions, organizing efforts, or strikes; others examine broader themes in women's labor history, focusing on a specific time period; and still others explore the situation of particular categories of women workers over a longer time span. This collection extends the scope of current research and interpretation in women's labor history, both conceptually and in terms of periodization - emphasis is placed on the post-World War I period where the literature is sparse. This book will be valuable for scholars, students and general readers alike. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMilkman, Ruth,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-work-and-protest aBook02378nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000028002152450065002432600034003083000023003425000033003655201346003985380036017446500014017806500030017946500031018246500024018556500022018796500029019018560101019309750009020319780203104217UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031042178 a10.4324/9780203104217 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aBraybon, Gail,eauthor.10aWomen Workers in the First World Warh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aCommentators writing soon after the outbreak of the First World War about the classic problems of women's employment (low pay, lack of career structure, exclusion from "men's jobs") frequently went on to say that the war had "changed all this", and that women's position would never be the same again. This book looks at how and why women were employed, and in what ways society's attitudes towards women workers did or did not change during the war. Contrary to the mythology of the war, which portrayed women as popular workers, rewarded with the vote for their splendid work, the author shows that most employers were extremely reluctant to take on women workers, and remained cynical about their performance. The book considers attitudes towards women's work as held throughout society. It examines the prejudices of government, trade unions and employers, and considers society's views about the kinds of work women should be doing, and their "wider role" as the "mothers of the race". First published in 1981, this is an important book for anyone interested in women's history, or the social history of the twentieth century. Companion volumes, Women Workers in the Second World War by Penny Summerfield, and Out of the Cage: Women's Experiences in Two World Wars by Gail Braybon and Penny Summerfield, are also published by Routledge. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-workers-in-the-first-world-war aBook02299nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450066002152600034002813000023003155000033003385201265003715380036016366500014016726500030016866500031017166500024017476500022017716500029017937000028018228560102018509750009019529780203120514UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802031205148 a10.4324/9780203120514 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen Writing and Writing About Womenh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis innovative collection of contemporary essays in feminist literary criticism provides a spectrum of approaches and positions, united by their common focus on writing by and about women. Spanning the novel, poetry, drama, film and criticism, the contributors emphasise some of the problems of theory and practice posed by writing as a woman and by women's representation in literature. The subjects of individual essays range from the nineteenth and twentieth century novel to avant-garde film, and from Victorian women poets to Russian women poets of today. Drawing on disciplines as diverse as structuralism, psychoanalysis, semiotics, socio-linguistics and Marxist analyses of literature, the essays suggest the variety and vigour of contemporary feminist literary criticism, as well as representing some of the debates currently animating it. Topics of common concern range from the nature of a women's tradition in literature to the scope and method of feminist literary criticism itself. Successfully bridging the gap between literary criticism and literary production, the scope of this collection will be of considerable interest to those concerned with current developments in literary criticism as well as to those in the field of women's studies. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aJacobus, Mary,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/women-writing-and-writing-about-women aBook02290nam a2200373Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450098002152600034003133000023003475000033003705201112004035380036015156500014015516500030015656500031015956500024016266500022016506500029016727000033017017000030017347000027017647000036017918560080018279750009019079780203081143UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802030811438 a10.4324/9780203081143 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen's Activismh[electronic resource] :bGlobal Perspectives from the 1890s to the Present. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aWomen's Activism brings together twelve innovative contributions from feminist historians from around the world to look at how women have always found ways to challenge or fight inequalities and hierarchies - as individuals; in international women's organizations; as political leaders; and in global forums such as the United Nations. The book is divided into three parts. Part I brings together four essays about organized women's activism across borders. The chapters in Part II focus on the variety of women's activism, and explore women's activism in different national and political contexts. Part III explores the changing relationships and inequalities among women. This book addresses women's internationalism and struggle for their rights in national and international arenas. It deals with racism and colonialism in Australia, India and Europe; women's movements and political activism in South Africa, Eastern Bengal (Bangladesh), the United Kingdom, Japan, Italy, Yugoslavia and France, and is essential reading for anyone interested in women's history and the history of activism in general. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHaan, Francisca de,eeditor.1 aAllen, Margaret,eeditor.1 aPurvis, June,eeditor.1 aDaskalova, Krassimira,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/womens-activism aBook01342nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450050002152600034002653000023002995000033003225200338003555380036006936500014007296500030007436500031007736500024008046500022008286500029008507000031008798560085009109750009009959781315012988UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97813150129888 a10.4324/9781315012988 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen's Fabian Tractsh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFirst published in 1988. This volume situates the work of the Fabian Women's Group in the context of both Fabian socialism and the thought and practise of the early twentieth-century Women's Movement. These tracts have been instrumental in developing present day discourse on the sexual, economic and social aspects of women's lives. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aAlexander, Sally,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/womens-fabian-tracts aBook02351nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450100002152600034003153000023003495000033003725201180004055380036015856500014016216500030016356500031016656500024016966500022017206500029017427000040017717000036018117000031018478560102018789750009019809780203714638UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802037146388 a10.4324/9780203714638 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen's Suffrage in the British Empireh[electronic resource] :bCitizenship, nation, and race. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis volume explores the politics of women's suffrage from the age of empire to the eve of decolonization. Leading international scholars analyze suffrage movements in Palestine under the British Mandate, in Southern Africa, in New Zealand and Australia, in India and Iran, in Canada and the US, as well as in the United Kingdom. The book emphasizes both transnational connections between suffrage campaigns around the British Empire, and complex interactions with other social movements in the metropole and colonies. It creates a new framework for asking critical questions about the social and cultural heterogeneity of women and the political and ideological diversity of feminism. Women's suffrage, it is suggested in this volume, should be read as much more than a narrative of gains or losses. Rather, women's suffrage has engaged with and reshaped some of the most important questions in modern politics, such as nation-building and democratic citizenship. Offering new theoretical perspectives as well as a wealth of original research material, Women's Suffrage in the British Empire will be of essential interest to students of history, politics and gender studies. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aFletcher, Ian Christopher,eeditor.1 aMayhall, Laura E. Nym,eeditor.1 aLevine, Philippa,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/books/womens-suffrage-in-the-british-empire aBook01695nam a2200313Ia 45000010021000000030008000210050017000290060019000460070015000650080041000800240033001210400021001540500017001750820019001922450129002112600034003403000023003745200607003975000033010045380036010376500014010736500030010876500031011176500024011486500022011726500029011948560148012239750010013719781138641839-HOF1-1UtOrBLW20161016222531.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.4324/9781138641839-HOF1-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aA Woman's Work is Never Done? Women and Leisure in the Nineteenth Century and Beyondh[electronic resource] /cRuth Robbins. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aThe modern idea of leisure ́ free time in which to do what one wishes ́ has not always been the way the word has been understood. For the Victorians and beyond, leisure was strongly marked by prohibitions relating to both class and gender. Indeed, leisure may even be defined by the choices available depending on class status. The development of women's leisure during the nineteenth century is a story of increasing freedoms in some domains, and increasing regulation in others. Both the freedoms and limitations of women's leisure are marked by the social expectations of relative class positions. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/essays/a-womans-work-is-never-done-women-and-leisure-in-the-nineteenth-century-and-beyond aEssay01987nam a2200313Ia 45000010021000000030008000210050017000290060019000460070015000650080041000800240033001210400021001540500017001750820019001922450102002112600034003133000023003475200954003705000033013245380036013576500014013936500030014076500031014376500024014686500022014926500029015148560120015439750010016639781138641839-HOF2-1UtOrBLW20161016222531.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.4324/9781138641839-HOF2-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFeminism and Literature in the Long Nineteenth Centuryh[electronic resource] /cValerie Sanders. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aThe literature of 1776́1928 inevitably reflects a wide range of responses to women's experiences, especially of home and family. Marriage is the key theme of the novel of the long nineteenth century, which records a questioning of society's assumptions about the appropriateness and availability of marriage, especially for middle-class women with aspirations to fulfil themselves in other ways. This essay focuses first on the themes addressed by the canonical women novelists, from Austen to Eliot, as they explored the frustrations and limitations of marriage for their protagonists, and then considers the bolder challenges posed by 'sensation' and 'New Woman' novelists, and poets such as Emily Dickinson. Literature, above all, was a place where women could explore the intimate details of their emotions and social interactions, imagining new relationships and life choices, while also protesting against the injustices they saw around them. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/essays/feminism-and-literature-in-the-long-nineteenth-century aEssay01946nam a2200313Ia 45000010021000000030008000210050017000290060019000460070015000650080041000800240033001210400021001540500017001750820019001922450080002112600034002913000023003255200955003485000033013035380036013366500014013726500030013866500031014166500024014476500022014716500029014938560100015229750010016229781138641839-HOF3-1UtOrBLW20161016222531.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.4324/9781138641839-HOF3-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFeminism and Women's Work, 1776-1928h[electronic resource] /cKaty Mullin. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aThis article surveys the emergence of work as a key priority for feminism, as it developed from early roots in the late eighteenth century, through the nineteenth-century women's movement, and into the early twentieth-century campaign for the vote. It argues that the pursuit of paid work and financial autonomy was initially slow to establish itself as a feminist priority, and draws attention to intersectional issues of class informing feminism's growth out of a small middle-class constituency. It surveys key issues relating to feminist agitation for access to employment and the professions, including tensions with trades unionist campaigns for the 'family wage', and the schism between egalitarian and maternalist feminists over the extent to which women should be 'protected' from perceived occupational dangers. It concludes by considering the enfranchisement of some women in 1918 and all women in 1928 as a partial and incomplete victory. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/essays/feminism-and-womens-work-1776-1928 aEssay01771nam a2200313Ia 45000010021000000030008000210050017000290060019000460070015000650080041000800240033001210400021001540500017001750820019001922450075002112600034002863000023003205200792003435000033011355380036011686500014012046500030012186500031012486500024012796500022013036500029013258560093013549750010014479781138641839-HOF4-1UtOrBLW20161016222531.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.4324/9781138641839-HOF4-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMen and the Women's Movementh[electronic resource] /cTara MacDonald. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aA number of men in nineteenth-century Britain and the United States were supportive of the women's movement. The essay discusses men such as William Thompson, John Stuart Mill, George Jacob Holyoake, Friedrich Engels, Frederick Douglass, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, and Floyd Dell; many other male intellectuals and reformers from the period might be considered male feminists. These men wrote political tracts in favour of women's right to vote and their social and professional development, attended conventions, or were members of pro-suffrage organizations. While the primary work of the feminist movement was certainly due to women, tracing the development of supportive male figures across the period can offer a more comprehensive view of women's rights in the nineteenth century. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/essays/men-and-the-womens-movement aEssay02167nam a2200313Ia 45000010021000000030008000210050017000290060019000460070015000650080041000800240033001210400021001540500017001750820019001922450094002112600034003053000023003395201150003625000033015125380036015456500014015816500030015956500031016256500024016566500022016806500029017028560112017319750010018439781138641839-HOF5-1UtOrBLW20161016222531.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.4324/9781138641839-HOF5-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aNotable Figures in Nineteenth-Century Feminismh[electronic resource] /cValerie Sanders. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aThis essay argues that feminist gains in the nineteenth century were frequently driven by the leadership of notable figures, men as well as women. Beginning with Mary Wollstonecraft, often deemed the 'mother' of modern feminism, it concludes with the campaign for the vote led by the suffragettes. While nineteenth-century feminism was initially galvanised by a need to change the law to remedy specific injustices (twice led by Caroline Norton), the middle period saw the forming of broad-spectrum groups with overlapping interests in women's employment, education, married women's property law, and eventually the suffrage. Leadership of specific campaigns was, however, still dependent on notable figures, such as Josephine Butler and Florence Nightingale, while Harriet Martineau and Frances Power Cobbe promoted feminist causes in their periodical writing. After comparing influential works by Harriet Taylor Mill and John Stuart Mill, the essay closes with Millicent Garrett Fawcett's Introduction to the centenary edition of Wollstonecraft's Vindication of the Rights of Woman, and her reflections on a hundred years of feminist activism. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/essays/notable-figures-in-nineteenth-century-feminism aEssay01822nam a2200313Ia 45000010021000000030008000210050017000290060019000460070015000650080041000800240033001210400021001540500017001750820019001922450089002112600034003003000023003345200811003575000033011685380036012016500014012376500030012516500031012816500024013126500022013366500029013588560111013879750010014989781138641839-HOF6-1UtOrBLW20161016222531.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.4324/9781138641839-HOF6-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aProstitution and the Contagious Diseases Actsh[electronic resource] /cJane Jordan. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aThe Contagious Diseases Acts (1864, 1866, 1869) were introduced in order to combat the high incidence of sexually transmitted disease in the British Army and Navy by forcibly registering and examining all prostitutes working within specified garrison towns and cities and naval ports. A repeal campaign was launched in 1869, led by the Ladies' National Association, who argued that state regulation was morally unjust in targeting prostitutes whilst ensuring the anonymity and health of their male clients. The 16-year repeal campaign (the CD Acts were finally abolished in 1886) was remarkable for the prominence of women within the movement who not only contested cultural assumptions about prostitution and working-class female sexuality but challenged the mid-Victorian feminine ideal of sexual purity. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/essays/prostitution-and-the-contagious-diseases-acts aEssay01718nam a2200313Ia 45000010021000000030008000210050017000290060019000460070015000650080041000800240033001210400021001540500017001750820019001922450097002112600034003083000023003425200698003655000033010635380036010966500014011326500030011466500031011766500024012076500022012316500029012538560112012829750010013949781138641839-HOF7-1UtOrBLW20161016222531.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.4324/9781138641839-HOF7-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aRace, Empire and the Making of Western Feminismh[electronic resource] /cAntoinette Burton. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTraditions and practices of western feminism are steeped in histories of race and empire to such a degree that western movements can and should be thought of as expressions of "imperial feminism." Slavery and imperial expansion helped to shape this phenomenon: women and men who sought female emancipation, and especially political rights, drew on images of the enslaved and colonized to make their case. Despite convictions about international sisterhood and the organizations to support it, non-western women were not viewed as equals. Those women had their own agendas which sometimes overlapped with western women's movements but were more shaped by anti-colonial nationalist solidarities. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/essays/race-empire-and-the-making-of-western-feminism aEssay01904nam a2200313Ia 45000010021000000030008000210050017000290060019000460070015000650080041000800240033001210400021001540500017001750820019001922450064002112600034002753000023003095200944003325000033012765380036013096500014013456500030013596500031013896500024014206500022014446500029014668560085014959750010015809781138641839-HOF8-1UtOrBLW20161016222531.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.4324/9781138641839-HOF8-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSexuality (1880-1928)h[electronic resource] /cJana Funke. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aIn the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, there was vibrant debate among feminists about the way in which male and female sexual behaviour was judged, understood and experienced. Feminist individuals and organisations were concerned with the question of how sexuality could be regulated or reformed in public and private. Female sexuality within and outside of marriage, motherhood and reproduction were topics of heightened interest. Such discussions were frequently linked to the figure of the New Woman, which began to emerge in the 1880s. Feminists also considered the political implications of non-reproductive forms of female sexuality. Scholarship has demonstrated the centrality of these negotiations of sexual behaviour and morality to early feminism. It has also drawn increasing attention to the complexity and contradictions inherent in feminist articulations of male and female sexuality in this historical period. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/essays/sexuality-1880-1928 aEssay02075nam a2200313Ia 45000010021000000030008000210050017000290060019000460070015000650080041000800240033001210400021001540500017001750820019001922450088002112600034002993000023003335201067003565000033014235380036014566500014014926500030015066500031015366500024015676500022015916500029016138560109016429750010017519781138641839-HOF9-1UtOrBLW20161016222531.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.4324/9781138641839-HOF9-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Campaign for Women's Suffrage in Britainh[electronic resource] /cJune Purvis. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aThis essay gives an overview of the campaign for the parliamentary vote for women in Britain from 1865 to 1928, focussing in particular on the 'suffragists' of the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies (NUWSS), formed in 1897, and the 'suffragettes' of the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU), established in 1903 by Emmeline Pankhurst and her eldest daughter Christabel, together with some local socialist women. The mixed sex NUWSS, led by Millicent Garrett Fawcett, advocated legal, peaceful means of campaigning whereas the women-only WSPU, with its slogan 'Deeds, not words' engaged in more assertive, unladylike tactics such as heckling MPs, processions to parliament, hunger-striking when imprisoned and enduring the torture of forcible feeding. As the Liberal Government of the day refused to yield on the women's question, the notorious WSPU even engaged, from 1912, in attacks on property. In 1918 certain categories of women aged thirty and over were granted the vote, equal parliamentary voting rights with men being finally won in 1928. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/essays/the-campaign-for-womens-suffrage-in-britain aEssay01680nam a2200313Ia 45000010022000000030008000220050017000300060019000470070015000660080041000810240034001220400021001560500017001770820019001942450066002132600034002793000023003135200712003365000033010485380036010816500014011176500030011316500031011616500024011926500022012166500029012388560089012679750010013569781138641839-HOF10-1UtOrBLW20161016222531.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.4324/9781138641839-HOF10-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Victorian New Womanh[electronic resource] /cLisa Hager. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aIn looking at the British New Woman of the late nineteenth century, this essay explores the complex and vibrant history of the cultural figure and her appearance in literary culture of the day. The term was first popularized in the mainstream press via an 1894 exchange between Sarah Grand and Ouida. Throughout the 1890s, the New Woman served as a way for writers to work through changing attitudes towards women's role in marriage, their sexual health, and their access to professional work, including literary work within the aesthetic movement. In addressing these issues, the New Woman was also a global figure, illustrating the complicated relationship between gender politics and British imperialism. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/essays/the-victorian-new-woman aEssay01646nam a2200313Ia 45000010022000000030008000220050017000300060019000470070015000660080041000810240034001220400021001560500017001770820019001942450070002132600034002833000023003175200673003405000033010135380036010466500014010826500030010966500031011266500024011576500022011816500029012038560090012329750010013229781138641839-HOF11-1UtOrBLW20161016222531.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.4324/9781138641839-HOF11-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aVictorian Anti-Feminismsh[electronic resource] /cJohanna Smith. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aFor much of the Victorian period, feminism was less a movement than a concern with issues of importance to women, and those who pursued those concerns were by no means united on every front. Thus "anti-feminism" might include not only those who resisted any change in women's condition but feminists who resisted reforms proposed by other feminists. This essay will focus on such contested issues: the nature and extent of women's employment outside the home, "the girl of the period" perceived as unfeminine, "the shrieking sisterhood" of feminist activists in public venues, the New Woman and her resistance to marriage, and the fraught question of women's suffrage. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/essays/victorian-anti-feminisms aEssay01667nam a2200313Ia 45000010022000000030008000220050017000300060019000470070015000660080041000810240034001220400021001560500017001770820019001942450092002132600034003053000023003395200653003625000033010155380036010486500014010846500030010986500031011286500024011596500022011836500029012058560109012349750010013439781138641839-HOF12-1UtOrBLW20161016222531.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.4324/9781138641839-HOF12-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aVictorian Education and the Women's Movementh[electronic resource] /cPhillip Mallett. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aThe nineteenth century saw significant reforms to the education of middle-class girls and young women, including the introduction of day and boarding schools with an emphasis on intellectual development rather than ornamental accomplishments; improved training and status for women teachers; and the gradual opening up to women of college and university education. But while advocates for women's education argued for its moral benefits, both for the women themselves and for society, their opponents recast the debate as one about the mental differences between the sexes, thus raising wider and potentially radical questions about women's nature. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/essays/victorian-education-and-the-womens-movement aEssay01754nam a2200313Ia 45000010022000000030008000220050017000300060019000470070015000660080041000810240034001220400021001560500017001770820019001942450065002132600034002783000023003125200793003355000033011285380036011616500014011976500030012116500031012416500024012726500022012966500029013188560083013479750010014309781138641839-HOF13-1UtOrBLW20161016222531.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.4324/9781138641839-HOF13-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen and Scienceh[electronic resource] /cClaire G. Jones. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aThis essay provides an overview of women and science, both as practitioners and subjects of scientific enquiry, from the late eighteenth century through to the first decades of the twentieth. It introduces the processes by which science acquired a masculine culture and describes the ways in which male-focused histories of science have misunderstood the landscape of science and, as a result, ignored women's scientific contributions. Feminist scholarship has rendered visible the ways in which women negotiated access to science, became part of scientific networks, collaborated as peers and made significant contributions to scientific knowledge. This essay also discusses the ways in which scientific women of the past made their own feminist interventions to counter their exclusion. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/essays/women-and-science aEssay02021nam a2200313Ia 45000010022000000030008000220050017000300060019000470070015000660080041000810240034001220400021001560500017001770820019001942450078002132600034002913000023003255201032003485000033013805380036014136500014014496500030014636500031014936500024015246500022015486500029015708560098015999750010016979781138641839-HOF14-1UtOrBLW20161016222531.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.4324/9781138641839-HOF14-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen and Victorian Spiritualismh[electronic resource] /cRosario Arias. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aThis article examines the powerful position that female spiritualist practitioners acquired in the spiritualist movement, and its association with the Women's Rights Movement. Woman-centred spiritualism allowed women ample space to examine and subvert Victorian gender norms. In particular, the s©♭ance or dark circle transgressed conventional behaviour and facilitated gender and social change. The female medium, and her trance, the state that allowed her to speak with the dead, were under male scrutiny by medical professionals, who equated them with illness and deviance, thus interpreting both the female body and the state as having a pathological source. In the 1980s cultural historians' work was instrumental in unearthing the forgotten story of female spiritualists. Even though other recent approaches to Victorian spiritualism have provided a more nuanced perspective on spiritualism as being diverse and heterogeneous, it cannot be denied that '[t]he occult was, after all, a female affair' (Kontou 2008: 280). aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/essays/women-and-victorian-spiritualism aEssay01993nam a2200313Ia 45000010022000000030008000220050017000300060019000470070015000660080041000810240034001220400021001560500017001770820019001942450095002132600034003083000023003425200972003655000033013375380036013706500014014066500030014206500031014506500024014816500022015056500029015278560113015569750010016699781138641839-HOF15-1UtOrBLW20161016222531.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.4324/9781138641839-HOF15-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen, Marriage and the Law in Victorian Societyh[electronic resource] /cPhilip Mallett. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aWhen Victoria came to the throne in 1837, two main factors shaped the lives of her female subjects: on the one hand, the rhetorical claim that marriage and family life were the necessary and sufficient conditions of a woman's fulfilment; on the other, the reality that under the common law principles of coverture a married woman's property, children, and body belonged to her husband, and her legal existence was wholly subsumed in his. The task facing Victorian feminists was to challenge the laws governing property rights, the custody of infants, divorce, prostitution, and the power of the courts to enforce a woman to live with her husband against her will (the doctrine of 'conjugal rights'). In varying degrees they were able to amend each of these laws, but not to achieve their core aims: to abolish the fiction of spousal unity, and to establish co-equal legal and political rights for men and women. That task remained for a later generation of feminists. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/essays/women-marriage-and-the-law-in-victorian-society aEssay01463nam a2200313Ia 45000010022000000030008000220050017000300060019000470070015000660080041000810240034001220400021001560500017001770820019001942450104002132600034003173000023003515200424003745000033007985380036008316500014008676500030008816500031009116500024009426500022009666500029009888560122010179750010011399781138641839-HOF16-1UtOrBLW20161016222531.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.4324/9781138641839-HOF16-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen's Movement's and Ideologies in the long 19th Centuryh[electronic resource] /cKrista Cowman. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aIndividual calls for increased social, economic and political rights for women grew from the eighteenth century, with a distinct women's movement identifiable from the mid-nineteenth century. This essay traces some of the key campaigns that fed into the broader women's movement and outlines some of the main feminist ideologies that shaped and influenced this movement up to the point of equal enfranchisement in 1928. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/essays/womens-movements-and-ideologies-in-the-long-19th-century aEssay01226nkm a2200349Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245010200188260003400290300002300324500003500347500003200382500003300414520009800447538003600545650001400581650003000595650003100625650002400656650002200680650002900702856013500731975001000866242818858UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a242818858 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aAmerican political cartoon captioned, 'I wonder if it's really becoming?'h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe image shows a stylish woman with 'Votes for women' hat with suffrage message on feathers. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/american-political-cartoon-captioned-i-wonder-if-its-really-becoming aImage01406nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001700000003000800017005001700025006001900042007001500061007000700076008004100083024002100124040002100145050001700166082001900183245008800202260003400290300002300324500006100347500003300408520030800441538003600749650001400785650003000799650003100829650002400860650002200884650002900906856012300935975001001058TWL/2004/1011/55UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2004/1011/55 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aAnti-suffrage postcardh[electronic resource] :bWhere women vote there is no rest. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPostcard, printed, cardboard, polychrome, anti-suffrage comic card (photographic image) depicts a man wearing an apron carrying a duster and scrubbing brush, asleep exhausted in a chair whilst his angry wife attempts to wake him, printed inscription front: 'Where women vote there is no rest', unposted. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/anti-suffrage-postcard-where-women-vote-there-is-no-rest aImage01318nkm a2200349Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245015900188260003400347300002300381500003500404500003200439500003300471520007300504538003600577650001400613650003000627650003100657650002400688650002200712650002900734856019500763975001000958242820739UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a242820739 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aAnti-woman's suffrage political cartoon proposing woman's progress in public sphere of life will lead her emotional impoverishmenth[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aCartoon by Laura E. Foster, published in Life magazine, August 1912. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/anti-womans-suffrage-political-cartoon-proposing-womans-progress-in-public-sphere-of-life-will-lead-her-emotional-impoverishment aImage01367nkm a2200337Ia 45000010010000000030008000100050017000180060019000350070015000540070007000690080041000760240014001170400021001310500017001520820019001692450052001882600034002403000023002745000061002975000033003585200352003915380036007436500014007796500030007936500031008236500024008546500022008786500029009008560090009299750010010197EWD/J/21UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a7EWD/J/21 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aArrest of a Suffragetteh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aBlack and white photograph of a suffragette being arrested [on Black Friday, 1910], with a policeman on each side, holding her arms, walking quickly. She is wearing a long black coat and gloves, with a white crocheted shawl over her head and around her shoulders. Taken after dark. Mounted on cream paper, with a press agency stamp on the reverse. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/arrest-of-a-suffragette aImage01308nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001200000003000800012005001700020006001900037007001500056007000700071008004100078024001600119040002100135050001700156082001900173245009300192260003400285300002300319500006100342500003300403520021400436538003600650650001400686650003000700650003100730650002400761650002200785650002900807856012400836975001000960TWL/1998/05UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/1998/05 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aBanner - Suffrage - WFL [Women's Freedom League] Dare to be Freeh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aBanner, cream, yellow and green striped cotton sateen ground, white painted lettering on green stripe 'WFL Dare to be Free', plain weave jute lining, five black plain weave cotton tapes along top edge to hang. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/banner-suffrage-wfl-womens-freedom-league-dare-to-be-free aImage01394nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001400000003000800014005001700022006001900039007001500058007000700073008004100080024001800121040002100139050001700160082001900177245009200196260003400288300002300322500006100345500003300406520029400439538003600733650001400769650003000783650003100813650002400844650002200868650002900890856012700919975001001046TWL/2004/1089UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2004/1089 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aBoard Gameh[electronic resource] :bSuffragettes In and Out of Prison Game and Puzzle. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aGame, printed, cardboard, playing: 'SUFFRAGETTES IN AND OUT OF PRISON GAME AND PUZZLE', double sided, -- side two: black printed inscription: 'Directions for Playing the Great Suffragette Game ... The MORNING LEADER IS THE PAPER FOR THE BUSY MAN and THE HOME ...', brown ground, laminated. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/board-game-suffragettes-in-and-out-of-prison-game-and-puzzle aImage01296nkm a2200337Ia 45000010015000000030008000150050017000230060019000400070015000590070007000740080041000810240019001220400021001410500017001620820019001792450106001982600034003043000023003385000061003615000033004225200170004555380036006256500014006616500030006756500031007056500024007366500022007606500029007828560137008119750010009485FWI/I/1/7/014UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a5FWI/I/1/7/014 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aBritain's First Women's Instituteh[electronic resource] :bLlanfairpwll Women's Institute, Anglesey. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPhotograph, printed postcard, monochrome, outside of the Llanfairpwll Women's Institute, Anglesey, the first Women's Institute in Great Britain, established in 1915. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/britains-first-womens-institute-llanfairpwll-womens-institute-anglesey aImage01249nkm a2200349Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245011100188260003400299300002300333500003500356500003200391500003300423520009900456538003600555650001400591650003000605650003100635650002400666650002200690650002900712856014800741975001000889238329151UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a238329151 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aCover of program for the National American Women's Suffrage Association processionh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aA woman, in elaborate attire, with cape, blowing long horn, with U.S. Capitol, Washington D.C. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/cover-of-program-for-the-national-american-womens-suffrage-association-procession aImage01439nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001300000003000800013005001700021006001900038007001500057007000700072008004100079024001700120040002100137050001700158082001900175245010800194260003400302300002300336500006100359500003300420520031200453538003600765650001400801650003000815650003100845650002400876650002200900650002900922856014000951975001001091TWL/2004/321UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2004/321 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aDemonstrations, Strikes, Marches, Processionsh[electronic resource] :bDeath of Emily Wilding Davison. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPhotograph, printed, paper, monochrome image of Emily Wilding Davison lying under the King's horse, 4 Jun 1913, view of Emily fallen on the race-track, taken over the heads of crowd, white border, manuscript inscription reverse: 'Death of Emily Wilding Davison 4 Jun 1913, she died on the 8th 4 days later'. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/demonstrations-strikes-marches-processions-death-of-emily-wilding-davison aImage01332nkm a2200337Ia 45000010010000000030008000100050017000180060019000350070015000540070007000690080041000760240014001170400021001310500017001520820019001692450062001882600034002503000023002845000061003075000033003685200298004015380036006996500014007356500030007496500031007796500024008106500022008346500029008568560099008859750010009847HFD/D/19UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a7HFD/D/19 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aElsie Duval's hunger strike medalh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMedal, dark silver, round with inscription; 'For Valour Hunger Strike', ribbon, cotton with purple, green and white stripes, sewn to the ribbon two metal bars enamelled purple white and green in horizontal stripes; reverse inscription 'Fed By Force 27/6/12 Elsie Duval', with presentation box. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/elsie-duvals-hunger-strike-medal aImage01319nkm a2200337Ia 45000010010000000030008000100050017000180060019000350070015000540070007000690080041000760240014001170400021001310500017001520820019001692450065001882600034002533000023002875000061003105000033003715200279004045380036006836500014007196500030007336500031007636500024007946500022008186500029008408560102008699750010009717EWD/M/30UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a7EWD/M/30 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aEmily Wilding Davison's rail ticketsh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aReturn portion of rail ticket for train travel between Epsom Race Course and London Victoria, 4 Jun 1913, white with black text; rail insurance ticket, blue, for return travel to New Oxford Street rail station, 10 May 1913. Both tickets previously held inside leather purse. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/emily-wilding-davisons-rail-tickets aImage01323nkm a2200337Ia 45000010010000000030008000100050017000180060019000350070015000540070007000690080041000760240016001170400021001330500017001540820019001712450065001902600034002553000023002895000061003125000033003735200279004065380036006856500014007216500030007356500031007656500024007966500022008206500029008428560104008719750010009757EWD/M/30UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a7EWD/M/30-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aEmily Wilding Davison's rail ticketsh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aReturn portion of rail ticket for train travel between Epsom Race Course and London Victoria, 4 Jun 1913, white with black text; rail insurance ticket, blue, for return travel to New Oxford Street rail station, 10 May 1913. Both tickets previously held inside leather purse. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/emily-wilding-davisons-rail-tickets-1 aImage01323nkm a2200337Ia 45000010010000000030008000100050017000180060019000350070015000540070007000690080041000760240016001170400021001330500017001540820019001712450065001902600034002553000023002895000061003125000033003735200279004065380036006856500014007216500030007356500031007656500024007966500022008206500029008428560104008719750010009757EWD/M/30UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a7EWD/M/30-2 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aEmily Wilding Davison's rail ticketsh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aReturn portion of rail ticket for train travel between Epsom Race Course and London Victoria, 4 Jun 1913, white with black text; rail insurance ticket, blue, for return travel to New Oxford Street rail station, 10 May 1913. Both tickets previously held inside leather purse. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/emily-wilding-davisons-rail-tickets-2 aImage01323nkm a2200337Ia 45000010010000000030008000100050017000180060019000350070015000540070007000690080041000760240016001170400021001330500017001540820019001712450065001902600034002553000023002895000061003125000033003735200279004065380036006856500014007216500030007356500031007656500024007966500022008206500029008428560104008719750010009757EWD/M/30UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a7EWD/M/30-3 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aEmily Wilding Davison's rail ticketsh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aReturn portion of rail ticket for train travel between Epsom Race Course and London Victoria, 4 Jun 1913, white with black text; rail insurance ticket, blue, for return travel to New Oxford Street rail station, 10 May 1913. Both tickets previously held inside leather purse. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/emily-wilding-davisons-rail-tickets-3 aImage01427nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001500000003000800015005001700023006001900040007001500059007000700074008004100081024001900122040002100141050001700162082001900179245008600198260003400284300002300318500006100341500003300402520033400435538003600769650001400805650003000819650003100849650002400880650002200904650002900926856012400955975001001079TWL/2009/03/17UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2009/03/17 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aEmmeline and Frederick Pethick Lawrence at the Old Baileyh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPhotograph, printed, paper, monochrome, Vera Holme driving a car out of which Emmeline Pethick Lawrence has just stepped, her husband Frederick with his back to the camera; typed caption below image: 'Suffragettes trial at the Old Bailey 15 May 1912. Mr and Mrs Pethwick Lawrence arrive in their motor. Note the Woman chauffeur'. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/emmeline-and-frederick-pethick-lawrence-at-the-old-bailey aImage01565nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001500000003000800015005001700023006001900040007001500059007000700074008004100081024001900122040002100141050001700162082001900179245007700198260003400275300002300309500006100332500003300393520049000426538003600916650001400952650003000966650003100996650002401027650002201051650002901073856011501102975001001217TWL/2009/01/25UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2009/01/25 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aEmmeline Pankhurst arrested at Buckingham Palaceh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPhotograph, printed, paper, monochrome, side view of Mrs Pankhurst being lifted off her feet by a policeman, by the railings at Buckingham Palace; typescript caption on reverse 'SUFFRAGETTE RIOT NEAR ROYAL PALACE. A hundred Suffragettes, including Mrs Pankhurst, made an attempt to interview the King at Buckingham Palace this afternoon, with disastrous results to the militants. Photo shows Chief Inspector Rolke carrying Mrs Pankhurst to the police station' 'Copyright CENTRAL NEWS'. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/emmeline-pankhurst-arrested-at-buckingham-palace aImage01569nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001500000003000800015005001700023006001900040007001500059007000700074008004100081024002100122040002100143050001700164082001900181245007700200260003400277300002300311500006100334500003300395520049000428538003600918650001400954650003000968650003100998650002401029650002201053650002901075856011701104975001001221TWL/2009/01/25UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2009/01/25-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aEmmeline Pankhurst arrested at Buckingham Palaceh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPhotograph, printed, paper, monochrome, side view of Mrs Pankhurst being lifted off her feet by a policeman, by the railings at Buckingham Palace; typescript caption on reverse 'SUFFRAGETTE RIOT NEAR ROYAL PALACE. A hundred Suffragettes, including Mrs Pankhurst, made an attempt to interview the King at Buckingham Palace this afternoon, with disastrous results to the militants. Photo shows Chief Inspector Rolke carrying Mrs Pankhurst to the police station' 'Copyright CENTRAL NEWS'. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/emmeline-pankhurst-arrested-at-buckingham-palace-1 aImage01320nkm a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580070007000730080041000800240018001210400021001390500017001600820019001772450067001962600034002633000023002975000061003205000033003815200267004145380036006816500014007176500030007316500031007616500024007926500022008166500029008388560105008679750010009727JCC/O/02/087UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a7JCC/O/02/087 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aEmmeline Pankhurst at Waterloo Stationh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPhotograph, printed, paper, monochrome, Emmeline Pankhurst leaning out of the window of a first class train carriage; manuscript inscription on reverse 'Mrs Pankhurst Farewell at Waterloo for America this [morning]', 'Photo Standard'. The image has been trimmed. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/emmeline-pankhurst-at-waterloo-station aImage01539nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001300000003000800013005001700021006001900038007001500057007000700072008004100079024001700120040002100137050001700158082001900175245007400194260003400268300002300302500006100325500003300386520047800419538003600897650001400933650003000947650003100977650002401008650002201032650002901054856010801083975001001191TWL/2002/666UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2002/666 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFirst World Warh[electronic resource] :bScottish Women's Hospitals. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPostcard, cardboard, printed, monochrome, white border, black text, image of Dr Elsie Inglis and other women from the London units of Scottish Women's Hospitals in Romania, printed inscription front: 'DR ELSIE INGLIS ON RETREAT LONDON UNITS OF THE SWH IN RUMANIA', manuscript inscription reverse: 'Miss Stephenson Francis Holland School for Girls, Clarence Gate, NW Speaker for march on ? ? ? Dental ? & other hand work. Monday March 12'. [SWH, Scottish Women's Hospitals]. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/first-world-war-scottish-womens-hospitals aImage01501nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001400000003000800014005001700022006001900039007001500058007000700073008004100080024001800121040002100139050001700160082001900177245008800196260003400284300002300318500006100341500003300402520041000435538003600845650001400881650003000895650003100925650002400956650002200980650002901002856012201031975001001153TWL/2004/366bUtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2004/366b aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFirst World Warh[electronic resource] :bWomen on the Home Front: Railway workers. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPhotograph, printed, paper, monochrome image of a 'signal woman pulling over the leavers in a signal box' during the First World War, white border, printed inscription reverse: 'B.B.511 WOMANS WORK. Railway workers in the Midlands. The signal woman pulling over the leavers in a signal box. British Official Photograph, Crown copyright reserved. MINISTRY OF INFORMATION -- PASSED FOR TRANSMISSION ABROAD'. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/first-world-war-women-on-the-home-front-railway-workers aImage01050nkm a2200325Ia 45000010010000000030008000100050017000180060019000350070015000540070007000690080041000760240014001170400021001310500017001520820019001692450076001882600034002643000023002985000061003215000033003825380036004156500014004516500030004656500031004956500024005266500022005506500029005728560113006019750010007147LGA/6/15UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a7LGA/6/15 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFlora Murray discharges patients, Endell Streeth[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/flora-murray-discharges-patients-endell-street aImage01137nkm a2200337Ia 4500001002700000003000800027005001700035006001900052007001500071007000700086008004100093024003100134040002100165050001700186082001900203245005700222260003400279300002300313500006100336500003300397520007800430538003600508650001400544650003000558650003100588650002400619650002200643650002900665856009500694975001000789SHAW PHOTOGRAPHS/1/21/2166UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aSHAW PHOTOGRAPHS/1/21/2166 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aGB Shaw and Lady Nancy Astorh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aClipping of GB Shaw and Nancy Astor sat in Cliveden talking as she knits. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/gb-shaw-and-lady-nancy-astor aImage01351nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001400000003000800014005001700022006001900039007001500058007000700073008004100080024001800121040002100139050001700160082001900177245009700196260003400293300002300327500006100350500003300411520024300444538003600687650001400723650003000737650003100767650002400798650002200822650002900844856013000873975001001003TWL/2002/329 UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2002/329 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aGroup portraith[electronic resource] :bMillicent Fawcett, Agnes Garrett, and Ray Strachey. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPostcard, cardboard, printed, black text, white border, monochrome photographic group portrait of Millicent Fawcett, Agnes Garrett, and Ray Strachey, after Royal Assent to the Equal Franchise Act, 1928, seated in a car parked on the road. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/group-portrait-millicent-fawcett-agnes-garrett-and-ray-strachey aImage01161nkm a2200349Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245007200188260003400260300002300294500003500317500003200352500003300384520009000417538003600507650001400543650003000557650003100587650002400618650002200642650002900664856010800693975001000801242818753UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a242818753 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aHumorous scene of life with 'the new woman'h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aWoman smoking and wearing knickers postures arrogantly as a man drudges over laundry. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/humorous-scene-of-life-with-the-new-woman aImage01027nkm a2200325Ia 4500001001400000003000800014005001700022006001900039007001500058007000700073008004100080024001800121040002100139050001700160082001900177245006000196260003400256300002300290500006100313500003300374538003600407650001400443650003000457650003100487650002400518650002200542650002900564856009800593975001000691WILPF/2011/18UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aWILPF/2011/18 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aInternational Congress of Womenh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/international-congress-of-women aImage01752nkm a2200337Ia 45000010011000000030008000110050017000190060019000360070015000550070007000700080041000770240015001180400021001330500017001540820019001712450084001902600034002743000023003085000061003315000033003925200671004255380036010966500014011326500030011466500031011766500024012076500022012316500029012538560122012829750010014043AMS/O/018UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a3AMS/O/018 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aJosephine Butler addresses the women of Pontefract 1872h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPoster, printed, paper, monochrome. It appears from the handbills issued by Mr Childers this morning, that he is afraid to meet us. And answer our questions on the Contagious Diseases Acts. Mrs Butler requests the women of Pontefract to meet her at the Large Room in Southgate this evening at Seven O'Clock, where she will show that the Bill Mr Childers purports to support, while pretending to repeal the Contagious Diseases Acts, is an extension of them to the whole country. Also that the Government to which he belongs has extended these Acts to the Colonies and Dependencies of the British Empire. Josephine Butler, Hon Sec of the Ladies' National Association'. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/josephine-butler-addresses-the-women-of-pontefract-1872 aImage01158nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245012200188260003400310300002300344500003500367500003200402500003300434538003600467650001400503650003000517650003100547650002400578650002200602650002900624856015700653975001000810238811065UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a238811065 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aLabor Day parade. Women on float of the Women's Auxilliary Typographical Union. New York Cityh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/labor-day-parade-women-on-float-of-the-womens-auxilliary-typographical-union-new-york-city aImage01197nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245014000188260003400328300002300362500003500385500003200420500003300452538003600485650001400521650003000535650003100565650002400596650002200620650002900642856017800671975001000849242818879UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a242818879 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aLIFE Magazine cover commemorating the final ratification of the 19th amendment granting women the right to voteh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/life-magazine-cover-commemorating-the-final-ratification-of-the-19th-amendment-granting-women-the-right-to-vote aImage01090nkm a2200337Ia 45000010010000000030008000100050017000180060019000350070015000540070007000690080041000760240014001170400021001310500017001520820019001692450052001882600034002403000023002745000061002975000033003585200075003915380036004666500014005026500030005166500031005466500024005776500022006016500029006238560090006529750010007427LGA/6/04UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a7LGA/6/04 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aLouisa Garrett Andersonh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aLouisa Garrett Anderson seated with the two dogs, William and Garrett. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/louisa-garrett-anderson aImage01304nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245019400188260003400382300002300416500003500439500003200474500003300506538003600539650001400575650003000589650003100619650002400650650002200674650002900696856023100725975001000956242816995UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a242816995 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMen looking in the window of the National Anti-Suffrage Association headquarters, National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage was active at the state and nationalh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/men-looking-in-the-window-of-the-national-anti-suffrage-association-headquarters-national-association-opposed-to-woman-suffrage-was-active-at-the-state-and-national aImage01325nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001200000003000800012005001700020006001900037007001500056007000700071008004100078024001600119040002100135050001700156082001900173245004600192260003400238300002300272500006100295500003300356520031900389538003600708650001400744650003000758650003100788650002400819650002200843650002900865856008300894975001000977TWL/2002/89UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2002/89 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMill, John Stuarth[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPostcard, printed, cardboard, monochrome photographic studio portrait of John Stuart Mill, side-profile, head and shoulders, white border, black text, printed inscription front: 'VOTES FOR WOMEN. JOHN STUART MILL, PIONEER OF WOMEN'S FREEDOM. Published by the Women's Freedom League, 1, Robert Street, Adelphi, WC'. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/mill-john-stuart aImage01456nkm a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580070007000730080041000800240018001210400021001390500017001600820019001772450066001962600034002623000023002965000061003195000033003805200406004135380036008196500014008556500030008696500031008996500024009306500022009546500029009768560103010059750010011087JCC/O/01/177UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a7JCC/O/01/177 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMillicent Fawcett's Hyde Park addressh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPostcard, printed, monochrome photographic image of the platform at an open-air suffrage rally, Mrs Fawcett wearing a sash and flowers speaking, a large banner behind her reads 'NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES PRESIDENT MRS FAWCETT LAW-ABIDING SUFFRAGISTS'; printed inscription on reverse 'MILLICENT GARRETT FAWCETT 1913 Fawcett Library City of London Polytechnic' [Reproduction c. 1990]. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/millicent-fawcetts-hyde-park-address aImage01255nkm a2200337Ia 450000100100000000300080001000500170001800600190003500700150005400700070006900800410007602400140011704000210013105000170015208200190016924500840018826000340027230000230030650000610032950000330039052001770042353800360060065000140063665000300065065000310068065000240071165000220073565000290075785601210078697500100090710/54/097UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a10/54/097 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aNational Union of Women's Suffrage Societies Pilgrimageh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMap showing the various routes of the 1913 NUWSS pilgrimage into London, with details of how to join the processions and programmes for each route [Fragile: in two halves]. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/national-union-of-womens-suffrage-societies-pilgrimage aImage01184nkm a2200349Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245009300188260003400281300002300315500003500338500003200373500003300405520007000438538003600508650001400544650003000558650003100588650002400619650002200643650002900665856013000694975001000824242816689UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a242816689 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aNational Women's Party demonstration in front of the White Househ[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe banner protests Wilson's failure to support women's suffrage. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/national-womens-party-demonstration-in-front-of-the-white-house aImage01234nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001300000003000800013005001700021006001900038007001500057007000700072008004100079024001700120040002100137050001700158082001900175245004600194260003400240300002300274500006100297500003300358520022600391538003600617650001400653650003000667650003100697650002400728650002200752650002900774856008300803975001000886TWL/2002/130UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2002/130 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPankhurst, Sylviah[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPostcard, printed, cardboard, monochrome photographic portrait of Sylvia Pankhurst, head and shoulders, front-profile, wearing fur hat and coat, white border, black text printed inscription front: 'MISS SYLVIA PANKHURST'. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/pankhurst-sylvia aImage01347nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001300000003000800013005001700021006001900038007001500057007000700072008004100079024001700120040002100137050001700158082001900175245006800194260003400262300002300296500006100319500003300380520029400413538003600707650001400743650003000757650003100787650002400818650002200842650002900864856010600893975001000999TWL/2004/04aUtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2004/04a aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPhotograph of Millicent Garrett Fawcetth[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPhotograph, printed, paper, monochrome photographic studio portrait of 'Mrs Fawcett', standing, front-profile, right hand resting on a chair, wearing a coat, hat and gloves, manuscript inscription reverse: 'London & National Society for Women's Service 50, Tuftan St. SW1 (f) Mrs Fawcett'. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/photograph-of-millicent-garrett-fawcett aImage01272nkm a2200349Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245014500188260003400333300002300367500003500390500003200425500003300457520005600490538003600546650001400582650003000596650003100626650002400657650002200681650002900703856018000732975001000912242816686UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a242816686 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPolitical cartoon entitled, THE SKY IS NOW HER LIMIT, women's progress from Slavery and House drudgery to Presidencyh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aNew York Times Current History; a monthly magazine. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/political-cartoon-entitled-the-sky-is-now-her-limit-womens-progress-from-slavery-and-house-drudgery-to-presidency aImage01248nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245018200188260003400370300002300404500003500427500003200462500003300494538003600527650001400563650003000577650003100607650002400638650002200662650002900684856018700713975001000900242818864UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a242818864 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPolitical cartoon shows woman peering over a fence labeled 'Woman's Sphere' while her toys 'Fashion' and 'gossip' lay abandoned. By Merle De Vore Johnsonh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/political-cartoon-shows-woman-peering-over-a-fence-labeled-womans-sphere-while-her-toys-fashion-and-gossip-lay-abandoned aImage01266nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001500000003000800015005001700023006001900040007001500059007000700074008004100081024001900122040002100141050001700162082001900179245005800198260003400256300002300290500006100313500003300374520023200407538003600639650001400675650003000689650003100719650002400750650002200774650002900796856009300825975001000918TWL/2009/01/62UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2009/01/62 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPortrait of Adelaide Andersonh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPhotograph, printed, paper, monochrome studio portrait of Adelaide Anderson wearing a hat with roses sewn round the crown, half length, front profile, mounted on card; manuscript inscription on reverse 'Adelaide Mary Anderson'. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/portrait-adelaide-anderson aImage01510nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001300000003000800013005001700021006001900038007001500057007000700072008004100079024001700120040002100137050001700158082001900175245006700194260003400261300002300295500006100318500003300379520046200412538003600874650001400910650003000924650003100954650002400985650002201009650002901031856010201060975001001162TWL/2003/609UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2003/609 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPortrait of Elizabeth Garrett Andersonh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPhotograph, printed, paper, monochrome reproduction of a painting of 'Elizabeth Garrett Anderson' by Laura Hertford, 1866, upper-body, side-profile, white border, printed inscription reverse: 'ELIZABETH GARRETT Age 30 - from a portrait by Laura Hertford, 1866. The original portrait is owned by the Misses Anderson who kindly gave permission for the photograph, which has been supplied by the Fawcett Library'. Image on the TWL timeline LSE digital library. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/portrait-anderson-elizabeth-garrett aImage01416nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001200000003000800012005001700020006001900037007001500056007000700071008004100078024001600119040002100135050001700156082001900173245008400192260003400276300002300310500006100333500003300394520033600427538003600763650001400799650003000813650003100843650002400874650002200898650002900920856011900949975001001068TWL/2004/10UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2004/10 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPortrait of Millicent Garrett Fawcett and Henry Fawcetth[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPhotograph, printed, paper, monochrome photographic studio portrait of Professor and Mrs Henry Fawcett, Professor Fawcett seated on a chair, holding a book, side-profile, Millicent Fawcett kneeling beside him, side-profile, manuscript inscription reverse: 'Professor & Mrs Henry Fawcett, Fawcett Society 27 Wilfred St London SW1.'. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/portrait-fawcett-millicent-garrett-and-henry-fawcett aImage01178nkm a2200349Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245006300188260003400251300002300285500003500308500003200343500003300375520012300408538003600531650001400567650003000581650003100611650002400642650002200666650002900688856010100717975001000818242816692UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a242816692 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPortrait of Elizabeth Cady Stantonh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aElizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902), important leader of the 19th century women's rights movement in the United States. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/portrait-of-elizabeth-cady-stanton aImage01204nkm a2200337Ia 45000010013000000030008000130050017000210060019000380070015000570070007000720080041000790240017001200400021001370500017001580820019001752450057001942600034002513000023002855000061003085000033003695200173004025380036005756500014006116500030006256500031006556500024006866500022007106500029007328560095007619750010008563AMS/G/01/03UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a3AMS/G/01/03 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPortrait of Josephine Butlerh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPhotograph, orange card mounted, border, monochrome, half length, left profile portrait, seated, cropped version of image 3AMS/G/01/02, image identical to 3AMS/G/01/04. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/portrait-of-josephine-butler aImage01138nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245013300188260003400321300002300355500003000378500002700408500003300435538003600468650001400504650003000518650003100548650002400579650002200603650002900625856013600654975001000790231664120UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a231664120 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPortrait of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley by Rothwell, Richard (1800-1868). Seated portrait, Oil on canvash[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett - Art. aSource: Everett - Art. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/portrait-of-mary-wollstonecraft-shelley-by-rothwell-richard-1800-1868 aImage01375nkm a2200337Ia 45000010011000000030008000110050017000190060019000360070015000550070007000700080041000770240015001180400021001330500017001540820019001712450091001902600034002813000023003155000061003385000033003995200285004325380036007176500014007536500030007676500031007976500024008286500022008526500029008748560124009039750010010273AMS/O/120UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a3AMS/O/120 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPosterh[electronic resource] :bCity of Manchester : Prevention of venereal diseases. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPoster, printed, black and red on white background, inscription at top in black: 'City of Manchester' 'Prevention of venereal diseases' in red, 8 points listed in black, first one: 'Prevention of disease is better than cure, and as regards Venereal Disease, indefinitely better.'. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/poster-city-of-manchester-prevention-of-venereal-diseases aImage01365nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245022700188260003400415300002300449500003500472500003200507500003300539538003600572650001400608650003000622650003100652650002400683650002200707650002900729856025900758975001001017242816989UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a242816989 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSeamstresses at long tables in the sewing-room at A.T. Stewart's Dry Goods Store at Broadway and 10th street, Owned by Irish-American multi-millionaire merchant, Alexander Turney Stewart (1803-1876)h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/seamstresses-at-long-tables-in-the-sewing-room-at-a-t-stewarts-dry-goods-store-at-broadway-and-10th-street-owned-by-irish-american-multi-millionaire-merchant-alexander-turney-stewart-1803-1876 aImage01560nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001400000003000800014005001700022006001900039007001500058007000700073008004100080024001800121040002100139050001700160082001900177245012300196260003400319300002300353500006100376500003300437520039900470538003600869650001400905650003000919650003100949650002400980650002201004650002901026856015701055975001001212TWL/1999/32/3UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/1999/32/3 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSuffrage campaigningh[electronic resource] :bNational Union Of Women's Suffrage Societies Protests Against Violence. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPoster, printed, paper, black printed inscription: 'THE NATIONAL UNION OF WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE SOCIETIES PROTESTS AGAINST VIOLENCE IT DID SO IN 1908, 1909 & 1911, & DOES SO NOW Our Union is far the Largest, the Oldest, and has always worked for WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE by NON-PARTY & LAW-ABIDING METHODS LOCAL SECRETARY: [space for writing name left blank]', cream ground, red and green border, laminated. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/suffrage-campaigning-national-union-of-womens-suffrage-societies-protests-against-violence aImage01845nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001200000003000800012005001700020006001900037007001500056007000700071008004100078024001600119040002100135050001700156082001900173245008400192260003400276300002300310500006100333500003300394520076500427538003601192650001401228650003001242650003101272650002401303650002201327650002901349856011901378975001001497TWL/2012/13UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2012/13 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSuffrage meetings and eventsh[electronic resource] :bSuffrage meeting poster. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPoster, printed, paper, monochrome, announcing a 'Great Demonstration' organised at the Colston Hall, Bristol on 4 Nov 1880 'To adopt a Memorial to her Majesty's Government praying for the Extension of the Parliamentary Franchise to Women Ratepayers, Landowners in Boroughs and Counties'; speakers advertised include Agnes Beddoe, Lydia Becker, Edith Downing, Catherine Osler, Alice Scatcherd, Emily Sturge, Jessie Craigen, Lilias Ashworth Hallett, Henrietta Muller and Helen Taylor. The poster was received in a dealer's envelope, on the back of which had been stuck two cuttings giving information about the event; these are included with the poster. For digital copy see The Women's Library @ LSE Digital timeline under 'Photographs, postcards and objects'. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/suffrage-meetings-and-events-suffrage-meeting-poster aImage01555nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001300000003000800013005001700021006001900038007001500057007000700072008004100079024001700120040002100137050001700158082001900175245009300194260003400287300002300321500006100344500003300405520045400438538003600892650001400928650003000942650003100972650002401003650002201027650002901049856012901078975001001207TWL/2002/387UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2002/387 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSuffragette waitresses for the WSPU Women's Exhibition May, 1909h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPostcard, printed, cardboard, monochrome photographic group portrait of suffragette waitresses carrying the WSPU tea service at the Women's Exhibition organised by the Women's Social & Political Union held at Princes Skating Rink, London, 13-26 May 1909, group includes suffragettes Ethel Solomon, Lina Lowry, Gertie Lowry, Mrs Saloman, Una Dugdale, manuscript inscription reverse: 'Suffragette waitresses for the WSPU Women's Exhibition May, 1909'. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/suffragette-waitresses-for-the-wspu-womens-exhibition-may-1909 aImage01039nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245006400188260003400252300002300286500003500309500003200344500003300376538003600409650001400445650003000459650003100489650002400520650002200544650002900566856009600595975001000691252135172UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a252135172 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSuffragettes in San Francisco, 1915h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/suffragettes-in-san-francisco aImage01107nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245010000188260003400288300002300322500003500345500003200380500003300412538003600445650001400481650003000495650003100525650002400556650002200580650002900602856012800631975001000759252140350UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a252140350 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736904aThe Age of Brass or The Triumph of Woman's Rights, Currier & Ives, 1869h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/the-age-of-brass-or-the-triumph-of-womans-rights-currier-ives aImage01378nkm a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580070007000730080041000800240018001210400021001390500017001600820019001772450092001962600034002883000023003225000061003455000033004065200276004395380036007156500014007516500030007656500031007956500024008266500022008506500029008728560129009019750010010307JCC/O/02/064UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a7JCC/O/02/064 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736904aThe arrest of Flora Drummond, Emmeline and Christabel Pankhursth[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPhotograph, printed, paper, monochrome, Flora Drummond, Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst being arrested by Inspector Jarvis at the Women's Social & Political Union offices, 13 Oct 1908; printed inscription on reverse 'London News Agency Photos Ltd, 46 Fleet Street, EC'. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/the-arrest-of-flora-drummond-emmeline-and-christabel-pankhurst aImage01095nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245010500188260003400293300002300327500003500350500003200385500003300417538003600450650001400486650003000500650003100530650002400561650002200585650002900607856011100636975001000747238056997UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a238056997 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736904aThe Female Rights' Musketeers, illustration in "The Police Gazette," c. 1846h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/the-female-rights-musketeers-illustration-in aImage01096nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245009500188260003400283300002300317500003500340500003200375500003300407538003600440650001400476650003000490650003100520650002400551650002200575650002900597856012200626975001000748242816731UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a242816731 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThree women's suffragists casting votes in New York City, ca. 1917h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/three-womens-suffragists-casting-votes-in-new-york-city aImage01199nkm a2200337Ia 45000010012000000030008000120050017000200060019000370070015000560070007000710080041000780240016001190400021001350500017001560820019001732450083001922600034002753000023003095000061003325000033003935200122004265380036005486500014005846500030005986500031006286500024006596500022006836500029007058560117007349750010008517VJH/5/2/03UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a7VJH/5/2/03 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aVera Holme, Women's Social & Political Union chauffeurh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPhotograph, Holme driving car, with passengers, one of whom is reading 'Votes for Women', WSPU pennant on the bonnet. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/vera-holme-womens-social-political-union-chauffeur aImage01243nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245016900188260003400357300002300391500003500414500003200449500003300481538003600514650001400550650003000564650003100594650002400625650002200649650002900671856019500700975001000895252134239UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a252134239 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aVictoria Claflin Woodhull, (1838-1927), first female candidate for President, addressing a Congressional committee on women's suffrage, 1872h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/victoria-claflin-woodhull-1838-1927-first-female-candidate-for-president-addressing-a-congressional-committee-on-womens-suffrage aImage01404nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001600000003000800016005001700024006001900041007001500060007000700075008004100082024002000123040002100143050001700164082001900181245005000200260003400250300002300284500006100307500003300368520036700401538003600768650001400804650003000818650003100848650002400879650002200903650002900925856010200954975001001056TWL/2009/02/212UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2009/02/212 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aVotes for Women at 21h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPhotograph, printed, paper, monochrome, six women in a line in a street, five carrying umbrellas, wearing full length tabards with slogans 'VOTES FOR WOMEN ON THE SAME TERMS AS MEN' and 'VOTES FOR WOMEN AT 21'; inscriptions on reverse 'Copyright photograph by PHOTOPRESS, Johnson's Court, Fleet Street EC. Telephone: City 7070' and manuscript inscription '1927'. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/votes-for-women-at-21-demonstration aImage01303nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245022800188260003400416300002300450500003500473500003200508500003300540538003600573650001400609650003000623650003100653650002400684650002200708650002900730856019600759975001000955242817010UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a242817010 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aVotes for Women, policeman holding back Woman with baby and Woman in academic robes to allow ex-convicts in stripped uniforms vote. Created by Women's Political Union, New York City, January 28, 1911h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/votes-for-women-policeman-holding-back-woman-with-baby-and-woman-in-academic-robes-to-allow-ex-convicts-in-stripped-uniforms-vote aImage01173nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245012900188260003400317300002300351500003500374500003200409500003300441538003600474650001400510650003000524650003100554650002400585650002200609650002900631856016500660975001000825245969071UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a245969071 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen Rivet Heaters and Passers who work ship building at the Puget Sound Navy Yard. Washington, WWIh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/women-rivet-heaters-and-passers-who-work-ship-building-at-the-puget-sound-navy-yard-washington-wwi aImage01313nkm a2200337Ia 45000010013000000030008000130050017000210060019000380070015000570070007000720080041000790240017001200400021001370500017001580820019001752450058001942600034002523000023002865000061003095000033003705200280004035380036006836500014007196500030007336500031007636500024007946500022008186500029008408560096008699750010009652ASL/11/66/3UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a2ASL/11/66/3 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen writers suffrage leagueh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPostcard, mechanically printed, coloured ink on white card, image of a female clinging to a statue of Britannia whilst a man wearing robes labelled; 'prejudice' attempts to pull her away, next to the artists name in black printed lettering reads; 'presented to WWSL in 1909'. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/women-writers-suffrage-league aImage01440nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001300000003000800013005001700021006001900038007001500057007000700072008004100079024001700120040002100137050001700158082001900175245004600194260003400240300002300274500006100297500003300358520043200391538003600823650001400859650003000873650003100903650002400934650002200958650002900980856008301009975001001092TWL/2002/222UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2002/222 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen's Franchiseh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aPostcard, printed, cardboard, black and white image, black text, white background, image of a woman in Medieval style dress, standing on top of a mountain, holding a flag with 'WOMAN'S FRANCHISE' inscribed on it, printed inscription front: 'AT LAST! Reproduced by kind permission of the Proprietors of 'PUNCH' from the cartoon of 23 Jan 1918, and published by the National Union of Suffrage Societies, 62, Oxford Street, W.1.'. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/womens-franchise aImage01268nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001300000003000800013005001700021006001900038007001500057007000700072008004100079024001700120040002100137050001700158082001900175245005700194260003400251300002300285500006100308500003300369520023800402538003600640650001400676650003000690650003100720650002400751650002200775650002900797856009400826975001000920TWL/2004/604UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 aTWL/2004/604 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen's Freedom League badgeh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aSource: The Women's Library, London School of Economics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aBadge, metal, enamel, round, produced by the produced by Women's Freedom League, white centre, green border, gold inscription: 'Women's Freedom League Votes for Women'. Reverse is engraved 'Toye & Co, Manufacturers, St Theobalds Rd'. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/womens-freedom-league-badge aImage01241nkm a2200349Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245009900188260003400287300002300321500003500344500003200379500003300411520011500444538003600559650001400595650003000609650003100639650002400670650002200694650002900716856013600745975001000881242816701UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a242816701 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen's Suffrage envoys from many states brought petitions to Congressh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFive thousand women massed on and about the East Steps of the Capitol singing Ethel Smyth's HYMN OF THE WOMEN. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/womens-suffrage-envoys-from-many-states-brought-petitions-to-congress aImage01240nkm a2200337Ia 4500001001000000003000800010005001700018006001900035007001500054007000700069008004100076024001400117040002100131050001700152082001900169245018900188260003400377300002300411500003500434500003200469500003300501538003600534650001400570650003000584650003100614650002400645650002200669650002900691856017200720975001000892242818651UtOrBLW20161010170040.0knnn o incr unu---uuuuuki uu 161010s2016 enknnn o ineng d8 a242818651 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aYoung women reading in library of a Washington, D.C. normal schools that trained elementary-school teachers. Photography by Frances Benjamin Johnston Collectionh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aCopyright: Everett Historical. aSource: Everett Historical. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/gallery/young-women-reading-in-library-of-a-washington-d-c-normal-schools-that-trained-elementary-school-teachers aImage01934nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501230020526000340032830000230036249000480038552008000043350000330123353800360126665000140130265000300131665000310134665000240137765000220140165000290142385601440145297500120159609699080500200265UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09699080500200265 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aA Challenge to Victorian motherhoodh[electronic resource] :bMona Caird and Gertrude Atherton /cTracey S. Rosenberg. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's Writing ;vVolume 12, Issue 3, 2005 aThe article explores a previously unknown episode in the life of New Woman writer Mona Caird (1854 - 1932): an 1889 visit from American writer Gertrude Atherton (1857 - 1948). Although both Caird and Atherton actively supported women's emancipation and wrote novels which championed radical views, Atherton disliked Caird, an opinion primarily based on Caird's alleged neglect of her only child. Both women rejected the prevailing view of their time-also held by other New Woman writers that motherhood fulfilled a woman's personal need as well as her obligation to society. By examining the complex views of these women, this article demonstrates how two notorious late-Victorian figures carved out public careers while struggling to place themselves within codes of acceptable female identity. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/a-challenge-to-victorian-motherhood-mona-caird-and-gertrude-atherton aJournal01912nam a2200325Ia 450000100220000000300080002200500170003000600190004700700150006600800410008102400340012204000210015605000170017708200190019424501460021326000340035930000230039349000550041652007140047150000330118553800360121865000140125465000300126865000310129865000240132965000220135365000290137585601700140497500120157409612025.2015.1015331UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612025.2015.1015331 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aA conscientious and well-informed Victorian mother'h[electronic resource] :bElizabeth Gaskell's letters to her daughters /cPauline Nestor. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 24, Issue 4, 2015 aUnlike the majority of the major female authors of the Victorian period, Elizabeth Gaskell was a mother, and her understanding of motherhood was one of the defining preoccupations of both her life and her fiction. In her lively and intimate letters to her four daughters, Gaskell provides a fascinating insight into mid-Victorian motherhood. 'Conscientious and well-informed', frank and self-reflexive, Gaskell's letters reflect the social and intellectual ferment of the period and shed light on some of the most pressing issues faced by mothers of the period, including the psychological development and education of children, the Victorian crises of religious schism and unbelief, and the rise of feminism. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/a-conscientious-and-well-informed-victorian-mother-elizabeth-gaskells-letters-to-her-daughters aJournal02131nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501540020526000340035930000230039349000550041652009260047150000330139753800360143065000140146665000300148065000310151065000240154165000220156565000290158785601770161697500120179309612020200200338UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612020200200338 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aA crisis in woman's history'h[electronic resource] :bFrances power cobbe's duties of women and the practice of everyday feminism /cSusan Hamilton. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 11, Issue 4, 2002 aThe article explores the ways in which Cobbe's Duties of Women grapples with new challenges facing the late nineteenth-century feminist movement, with an emphasis on the particular force of Cobbe's text that results from her unique role as a mainstream journalist of mid-Victorian feminism to non-feminist-identified audiences. It argues that Duties of Women participates in the ongoing negotiation of the representation of suffrage, both within feminist communities and in the ways that feminism is represented and understood by a non-feminist public. Specifically, the author argues that Cobbe's lecture series and book are generically linked to the conduct book. They offer advice for the appropriate daily practice of emancipated womanhood at a time when significant changes in feminist practice, such as the increasing emphasis on suffrage, threatened, in Cobbe's view, the larger public perception of that movement. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/a-crisis-in-womans-history-frances-power-cobbes-duties-of-women-and-the-practice-of-everyday-feminism aJournal02378nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624502040020526000340040930000230044349000540046652010720052050000330159253800360162565000140166165000300167565000310170565000240173665000220176065000290178285602290181197500120204009612029600200112UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612029600200112 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aA "pair of ́Œ infernal queenś? a reassessment of the dominant representations of emmeline and christabel pankhurst, first wave feminists in edwardian britainh[electronic resource] /cJune Purvis. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 5, Issue 2, 1996 aThis article reassesses the dominant representations of two First Wave feminists in Edwardian Britain, Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst, who founded the women's Social and Political Union (WSPU) on 10 October 1903 with the expressed aim of fighting for the right of women to enfranchisement on the same terms as it was, or may be, granted to men. Both women, it is argued, have been represented by historians mainly in a negative light which, at best, ignores their women-centred approach to politics and, at worst, misrepresents their views. However, if we are to understand these women as feminists then we must examine their own rationale for their actions which is in wide divergence with the views expressed by historians. As women-identified women, Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst were forerunners of some of the ideas articulated by radical feminists in the Second Wave of feminism in the West in the 1970s. In this article, this theme is illustrated through focusing on two key areas - the world-view of the Pankhurst women and their style of leadership. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/a-pair-of-infernal-queens-1-a-reassessment-of-the-dominant-representations-of-emmeline-and-christabel-pankhurst-first-wave-feminists-in-edwardian-britain aJournal01095nam a2200313Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501070020526000340031230000230034649000460036950000330041553800360044865000140048465000300049865000310052865000240055965000220058365000290060585601350063497500120076901440359008586393UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/01440359008586393 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aAllegory, feminist thought and the dreams of olive Schreinerh[electronic resource] /cLaura Chrisman. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aProse Studies ;vVolume 13, Issue 1, 1990 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/allegory-feminist-thought-and-the-dreams-of-olive-schreiner aJournal02088nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501320020526000340033730000230037149000550039452009250044950000330137453800360140765000140144365000300145765000310148765000240151865000220154265000290156485601570159397500120175009612020200200321UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612020200200321 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aAn articulate and definite cry for political freedom'h[electronic resource] :bthe ulster suffrage movement /cDiane Urquhart. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 11, Issue 2, 2002 aThis article analyses the development of the Ulster suffrage movement and assesses the impact of the third Irish home rule crisis of 1912-14 on the much lauded, although always tenuous, unity of Irish suffragism. The tensions caused by the decision of Ulster unionists to grant women's suffrage under their plans for a provisional government are considered. In addition to this, the establishment of a branch of the Women's Social and Political Union in Ulster caused serious apertures within the indigenous suffrage movement and put Belfast in the midst of what contemporaries believed to be a 'genuine revolution'. Ultimately, an examination of Ulster suffragism highlights not only the value of conducting local studies in order to capture and understand the complexity of the suffrage movement, but also the difficulties and frustrations which women faced whilst campaigning for the enfranchisement of their own sex. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/an-articulate-and-definite-cry-for-political-freedom-the-ulster-suffrage-movement aJournal02876nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501750020526000340038030000230041449000550043752016300049250000330212253800360215565000140219165000300220565000310223565000240226665000220229065000290231285601970234197500120253809612020902770949UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612020902770949 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aAn Impudent Intrusion?' Assessing the Life of Elizabeth Wolstenholme Elmy, First́Wave Feminist and Social Reformer (1833́1918)h[electronic resource] /cMaureen Wright. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 18, Issue 2, 2009 aThis article seeks to re-evaluate the life of first-wave feminist Elizabeth Wolstenholme Elmy through the lens of her own autobiographical fragments and newly-discovered material concerning her genealogy and childhood familial circumstances. One of the most significant but under-researched feminists of her generation, the 'self' constructed by Wolstenholme Elmy is one that appears to negate the influences of youthful familial circumstances on her later life and career--a career she deemed worthy of auto/biographical narration. This supports her forcefully expressed opinion that analysis of the private 'self' was an unsuitable subject for biographical study: an 'impudent intrusion' of little value when assessing a subject's historical merit, a view this article seeks to contend. By acknowledging the complex reflexive nature of the auto/biographical process and thus the biographer's inability to provide an 'essence' of the subject's 'self', the article offers a construction of how the events of Wolstenholme Elmy's childhood might have impacted on her intellectual and emotional pre-disposition to adopt the cause of feminism. The portrait of Wolstenholme Elmy as expressed by this article contrasts with the largely negative impression of her character gained from analysis of the headline accounts of the nineteenth-century women's emancipation struggle and the 'classic' feminist memoirs upon which those accounts were, in part, based. As such the article builds upon recent revisionist accounts that have highlighted the importance of Wolstenholme Elmy's life to the study of the Victorian feminist movement. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/an-impudent-intrusion-assessing-the-life-of-elizabeth-wolstenholme-elmy-first-wave-feminist-and-social-reformer-1833-1918 aJournal02310nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501680020526000340037330000230040749000550043052010900048550000330157553800360160865000140164465000300165865000310168865000240171965000220174365000290176585601780179497500120197209612020500530133UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612020500530133 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aAn Unexpected Recruit to Feminism'h[electronic resource] :bJessie Boucherett's 'Feminist Life' and the importance of being wealthy /cEllen Jordan; Anne Bridger. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 15, Issue 3, 2006 aIn 1859 Jessie Boucherett, the daughter of a Lincolnshire landowner possessed of an independent income, was inspired by press discussions of the need to find alternative occupations for women to make contact with the women who were already spreading this message through the English Woman's Journal. With their rather grudging support she founded a society, which still exists, to further this aim, the Society for Promoting the Employment of Women (now the Society for Promoting the Training of Women). Using the records of this Society, now housed at Girton College, Cambridge, this article looks at the way commitment to this cause allowed a woman from a wealthy, high Tory, landed background to turn herself in six years into the feminist who put up the initial money for the women's suffrage campaign, and went on to be a leading figure in campaigns to reform the married women's property laws and against legislation restricting women's work. It examines in particular the use she made of her personal wealth to direct the strategies of the activist groups to which she belonged. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/an-unexpected-recruit-to-feminism-jessie-boucheretts-feminist-life-and-the-importance-of-being-wealthy aJournal01529nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624500900020526000340029530000230032949000540035252004480040650000330085453800360088765000140092365000300093765000310096765000240099865000220102265000290104485601180107397500120119109612029600200123UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612029600200123 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aAnarchism and feminismh[electronic resource] :ba historical survey /cSharif Gemie. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 5, Issue 3, 1996 aThis article discusses a double paradox: first, that the anarchists, so proud of their genuine commitment to anti-authoritarian politics, were yet so blind to the oppressive effects of patriarchy.However, secondly, within this generally male-orientated culture, there were still ambivalences in anarchist politics, with some pockets of real sympathy for feminism. Material is drawn from the experience of anarchists within Europe, 1840 - 1940. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/anarchism-and-feminism-a-historical-survey aJournal01144nam a2200313Ia 45000010021000000030008000210050017000290060019000460070015000650080041000800240033001210400021001540500017001750820019001922450138002112600034003493000023003834900058004065000033004645380036004976500014005336500030005476500031005776500024006086500022006326500029006548560135006839750012008180191-6599(91)90137-NUtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1016/0191-6599(91)90137-N aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aAux citoyennes!'h[electronic resource] :bWomen, politics, and the Paris Commune of 1871 /cKathleen Jones & Fran©ʹoise Verg©·s. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aHistory of European Ideas ;vVolume 13, Issue 6, 1991 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/aux-citoyennes-women-politics-and-the-paris-commune-of-1871 aJournal02151nam a2200325Ia 45000010022000000030008000220050017000300060019000470070015000660080041000810240034001220400021001560500017001770820019001942450120002132600034003333000023003674900048003905201010004385000033014485380036014816500014015176500030015316500031015616500024015926500022016166500029016388560146016679750012018130013838X.2015.1011893UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/0013838X.2015.1011893 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aBetween Fashion and Feminismh[electronic resource] :bHistory in Mid-Victorian Women's Magazines /cBarbara Korte. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aEnglish Studies ;vVolume 96, Issue 4, 2015 aThe article offers a first exploration of the contribution of women's magazines to mid-Victorian historical culture. Distinguished by a special heterogeneity in form and content, magazines showcase the diversity of historical culture and highlight its contested positions and contradictions. The tensions between conservative ideals and progressive alternatives that marked the debate about the "woman question" also characterise Victorian approaches to women's history. This is shown for a sample of middle-class women's magazines published between 1850 and 1880: the Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine, the Ladies' Treasury and the Queen, all three being market-leading publications, and, for comparison, the feminist English Woman's Journal. It will be asked what areas of history the magazines address, how they utilise these areas to negotiate the social position of women as well as models of femininity, and how their presentation of history relates to dominant male-biased strands of historiography. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/between-fashion-and-feminism-history-in-mid-victorian-womens-magazines aJournal02228nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501510020526000340035630000230039049000540041352010330046750000330150053800360153365000140156965000300158365000310161365000240164465000220166865000290169085601710171997500120189009612029400200070UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612029400200070 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aBridging cross-cultural feminismsh[electronic resource] :bannie besant and women's rights in England and India, 1874-1933 /cAnderson Fix Nancy. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 3, Issue 4, 1994 aAnnie Besant was a Victorian radical whose outspoken views included advocacy of women's rights and opposition to British imperial policies. In her mid-forties she went to live in India. Contesting British attempts to Westernize Indian society, Besant found herself in the seemingly anomalous position of defending traditional Indian patriarchy and resisting efforts to reform the status of Indian women. Such conservatism brought on Besant criticism not only from Western liberals and Christian missionaries, but also from many Indian social reformers. When she gradually shifted her views and voiced her support for Indian women's rights, Indian nationalists condemned her as a British imperialist. The conflict between loyalty to national heritage and opposition to traditional patriarchy is one that colonized women have commonly experienced. By examining how an anti-imperialist British feminist responded to the question of women's reform in India, this paper offers another perspective on the complexities of this dilemma. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/bridging-cross-cultural-feminisms-annie-besant-and-womens-rights-in-england-and-india-1874-1933 aJournal01662nam a2200325Ia 45000010017000000030008000170050017000250060019000420070015000610080041000760240029001170400021001460500017001670820019001842450099002032600034003023000023003364900054003595200562004135000033009755380036010086500014010446500030010586500031010886500024011196500022011436500029011658560130011949750012013240961202920010204UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/0961202920010204 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aBritish Women Missionaries in Nineteenth́Century Chinah[electronic resource] /cDelia Davin. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 1, Issue 2, 1992 aThere were only a few women among the first Protestant missionaries to settle in China, and most were married, yet by the end of the nineteenth century, the majority of missionaries were women, many of them single. This article focusses on British women missionaries, discussing their motivation for going so far at a time when women were supposed to be confined to the world of home and the family. It looks at their lives in China, the role models they presented to Chinese women, and their own rather conservative views of what their influence should be. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/british-women-missionaries-in-nineteenth-century-china aJournal02107nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501340021126000340034530000230037949000550040252009320045750000330138953800360142265000140145865000300147265000310150265000240153365000220155765000290157985601610160897500120176909612025.2012.658177UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612025.2012.658177 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aChanging Spacesh[electronic resource] :bart, politics, and identity in the home studios of the Suffrage Atelier /cTara Morton. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 21, Issue 4, 2012 aThe Suffrage Atelier was an artists' group formed to produce propaganda for the women's suffrage campaign. Its headquarters were located in a series of artists' London homes between 1909 and 1914. This article explores how Atelier artists used these and other domestic spaces for a broad range of social, artistic, and political practices. It examines how dwellings were altered and decorated, how they were used for exhibitions and performance, as well as for propaganda production and suffrage lectures. Throughout, the article considers the interplay between the Atelier's practices, its creative and feminist identities, and domestic space. Gender histories have produced a wealth of scholarship on women's diverse practices at home, examining how these challenged bourgeois notions that separated domestic space from the public realm of work and politics. This article sets the Atelier's home studios within these debates. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/changing-spaces-art-politics-and-identity-in-the-home-studios-of-the-suffrage-atelier aJournal02033nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501700021126000340038130000230041549000550043852007940049350000330128753800360132065000140135665000300137065000310140065000240143165000220145565000290147785601890150697500120169509612025.2013.820597UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612025.2013.820597 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aChristabel Pankhurst and the Smethwick Electionh[electronic resource] :bright-wing feminism, the Great War and the ideology of consumption /cNicoletta F. Gullace. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 23, Issue 3, 2014 aThis article examines the roots of Christabel Pankhurst's Women's Party in the Women's Social and Political Union's adoption of right-wing feminism during the Great War. It explores the blending of radical-right and imperialist ideology with a feminist agenda that combined a demand for women's rights with an anti-Bolshevik economic policy based on the power of female consumers. This blending of feminism and nationalism won Christabel the 'coupon' endorsement of the Lloyd George coalition and became the ideological platform for her parliamentary campaign in the Smethwick election. Although Christabel lost the election by 775 votes, it is contended that the Women's Party platform offers clues to the attraction of right-wing ideology to some notable figures in the women's movement. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/christabel-pankhurst-and-the-smethwick-election-right-wing-feminism-the-great-war-and-the-ideology-of-consumption aJournal02279nam a2200325Ia 450000100150000000300080001500500170002300600190004000700150005900800410007402400270011504000210014205000170016308200190018024502060019926000340040530000230043949000790046252009720054150000330151353800360154665000140158265000300159665000310162665000240165765000220168165000290170385602090173297500120194108038740307275UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/08038740307275 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aCreating a voice - acquiring rights. Women in the Norwegian Mission Society and the process towards formal organizational rights in 1904h[electronic resource] /cKarina Hestad Skeie & Kristin Norseth. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aNordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research ;vVolume 11, Issue 1, 2003 aIn 1904 women in the Lutheran Norwegian Mission Society (NMS) went from having no organizational rights to gaining full rights to vote and partial eligibility to organizational boards. The process towards formal rights for women took place in the NMS parallel with a general development in women's rights in the Norwegian society. The NMS was part of this women's awareness-movement, indirectly and directly furthering it through its work, being the largest women's organization in Norway at the time. Contrary to the myth of the passive and submissive Christian woman, women in the NMS worked both indirectly and directly to acquire the right to formal influence. This case further shows how some women in the mission developed emancipatorical and women-conscious interests and views through their mission engagement. Some women used their mission engagement as an emancipatorical force. For them, women's emancipation had a theological inspiration and legitimation. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/creating-a-voice-acquiring-rights-women-in-the-norwegian-mission-society-and-the-process-towards-formal-organizational-rights-in-1904 aJournal02230nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501430020526000340034830000230038249000550040552010440046050000330150453800360153765000140157365000300158765000310161765000240164865000220167265000290169485601690172397500120189209612020701627977UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612020701627977 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aCulpable Complicityh[electronic resource] :bthe medical profession and the forcible feeding of suffragettes, 1909́1914 /cJ. F. Geddes. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 17, Issue 1, 2008 aThe forcible feeding of suffragettes in prisons in Edwardian Britain was an abuse that had serious physical and psychological consequences for those fed, and one in which the medical profession was complicit, by failing as a body to condemn the practice as both medically unnecessary and dangerous. An over-cosy relationship with the Government through the five-year period during which compulsory feeding took place resulted in either silence or outright support for the Home Office from the profession's key spokesmen--the Presidents of the Royal Colleges and the editors of the main medical journals. Sir Victor Horsley, an eminent but controversial figure, led opposition to forcible feeding, but, with relatively few male colleagues backing him, it continued unchecked. Undeterred, Horsley worked tirelessly to make his profession aware of the realities of the practice and recognise that, as the militant campaign had escalated, the Home Office had used the doctors administering it to punish, rather than treat, the hunger strikers. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/culpable-complicity-the-medical-profession-and-the-forcible-feeding-of-suffragettes-1909-1914 aJournal01854nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501780020526000340038330000230041749000550044052006060049550000330110153800360113465000140117065000300118465000310121465000240124565000220126965000290129185601960132097500120151609612020701707183UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612020701707183 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aDealing with the Issue of Prostitution; Mobilizing Feminisms in France, Switzerland and Belgium (1875́1920) (work in progress)h[electronic resource] /cChristine Machiels. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 17, Issue 2, 2008 aFrom the end of the nineteenth century, several major figures from Belgian, French and Swiss feminist movements, inspired by Josephine Butler's ideas, have contributed to the arguments about state-regulated prostitution and the trafficking of women. If, at a national level women did not have the vote, nevertheless in both the national and international arena they brought the issue of how to control prostitution to the fore. How did feminists view the State's role and its involvement with prostitution? What was the impact of these debates on the boundaries between 'private' and 'public' spheres? aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/dealing-with-the-issue-of-prostitution-mobilizing-feminisms-in-france-switzerland-and-belgium-1875-1920-work-in-progress aJournal01145nam a2200313Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501270020526000340033230000230036649000600038950000330044953800360048265000140051865000300053265000310056265000240059365000220061765000290063985601510066897500120081908905499108583336UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/08905499108583336 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aDisruptive desireh[electronic resource] :bMedical careers for victorian women in fact and fiction /cChristine Thompson. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aNineteenth Century Contexts ;vVolume 15, Issue 2, 1991 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/disruptive-desire-medical-careers-for-victorian-women-in-fact-and-fiction-1 aJournal01133nam a2200313Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501250020526000340033030000230036449000480038750000330043553800360046865000140050465000300051865000310054865000240057965000220060365000290062585601530065497500120080700497871003661711UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/00497871003661711 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aEconomics, Evolution, and Feminism in Charlotte Perkins Gilman's Utopian Fictionh[electronic resource] /cLI-WEN CHANG. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's Studies ;vVolume 39, Issue 4, 2010 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/economics-evolution-and-feminism-in-charlotte-perkins-gilmans-utopian-fiction aJournal01146nam a2200313Ia 45000010021000000030008000210050017000290060019000460070015000650080041000800240033001210400021001540500017001750820019001922450127002112600034003383000023003724900059003955000033004545380036004876500014005236500030005376500031005676500024005986500022006226500029006448560147006739750012008200191-6599(87)90147-1UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1016/0191-6599(87)90147-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aEducation, gender and social change in Victorian liberal feminist theoryh[electronic resource] /cJoyce Senders Pedersen. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aHistory of European Ideas ;vVolume 8, Issue 4-5, 1987 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/education-gender-and-social-change-in-victorian-liberal-feminist-theory aJournal02309nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501150021126000340032630000230036049000500038352011750043350000330160853800360164165000140167765000300169165000310172165000240175265000220177665000290179885601440182797500120197109699082.2013.773777UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09699082.2013.773777 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aEMBODYING AGENCYh[electronic resource] :bOUIDA'S SENSATIONAL SHAPING OF THE BRITISH NEW WOMAN /cLisa Hager. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's Writing ;vVolume 20, Issue 2, 2013 aExemplifying the connections between the mid- and late-centuries, the late nineteenth-century work of Ouida suggests a continued mobilization of sensational vocabularies of representation, specifically the power and danger of outside forces to overcome the individual, in order to locate agency or the lack thereof within the body. Moreover, Ouida's work demonstrates the extent to which this discourse offers a way to further understand the literary legacy of sensation fiction as well as the cultural contexts that made New Women discourse a significant part of fin-de-si©·cle literary culture. In order to tease out the connecting discursive threads between these two genres, the author first turns to Ouida's representations of desire in Princess Napraxine (1884), a post-sensation novel that retains key vestiges of the mid-century genre, and then examines her 1894 anti-New Woman article in the North American Review "The New Woman". By looking at these two pieces in conversation together, this article highlights the strategic ways in which Ouida's deployment of this sensational vocabulary positions the body of the New Woman as the site of agency and desire. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/embodying-agency-ouidas-sensational-shaping-of-the-british-new-woman aJournal01628nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624500860020526000340029130000230032549000550034852005540040350000330095753800360099065000140102665000300104065000310107065000240110165000220112565000290114785601140117697500120129009612020300200353UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612020300200353 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aEmma Brookeh[electronic resource] :bFabian, feminist and writer /cKay Daniels. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 12, Issue 2, 2003 aLargely overlooked in Fabian historiography and absent from major works of biographical reference, Emma Brooke (c1844-1926) was an early Fabian and successful novelist whose analysis of 'the woman question', and especially the sex question, significantly predates the better known critique by H. G. Wells. This posthumously published article examines Brooke's thinking over time, drawing on personal correspondence and literary representations, and offers further insights into the relationship between feminism and socialism in the 1880s and 1890s. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/emma-brooke-fabian-feminist-and-writer aJournal01145nam a2200313Ia 45000010017000000030008000170050017000250060019000420070015000610080041000760240029001170400021001460500017001670820019001842450130002032600034003333000023003674900053003905000033004435380036004766500014005126500030005266500031005566500024005876500022006116500029006338560157006629750012008190046760930220303UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/0046760930220303 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aEntering the public arenah[electronic resource] :bthe female members of the London School Board, 1870́1904 /cJane Martin. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aHistory of Education ;vVolume 22, Issue 3, 1993 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/entering-the-public-arena-the-female-members-of-the-london-school-board-1870-1904 aJournal02924nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501770020526000340038230000230041649000550043952016680049450000330216253800360219565000140223165000300224565000310227565000240230665000220233065000290235285602050238197500120258609612020100200291UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612020100200291 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aExperiences of women estate workers during the apprenticeship period in St Vincent, 1834́38h[electronic resource] :bthe transition from slavery to freedom /cSheena Boa. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 10, Issue 3, 2001 aIn 1834, the British Government abolished slavery in the British Caribbean. In order to appease slave owners, the Government awarded them ℗Đ20 million compensation money and initiated an apprenticeship period. The aim of the apprenticeship period was to provide a transition from slave to wage labour and tie the ex-slaves to their owners for a further six years. The apprenticeship period was marred by repressive acts by planters against their workers. Women were especially singled out for abuse and lost many of the rights they had gained during slavery. Apprenticeship was eventually abandoned in 1838. Stories of excessive cruelty convinced the colonial authorities that the working relationship between apprentices and managers within the sugar estates had not improved. This article examines the experiences of women apprentices in St Vincent to highlight the indignities that they faced. It also explores the actions that some women employed to improve their working conditions. Previous studies of the Caribbean have mainly focused on the slavery period or the twentieth century. There has so far been little attention paid to the lives of African-Caribbean women immediately after the abolition of slavery. This study helps to explain why so many women withdrew from estate work as soon as they were fully free and chose instead to concentrate on growing and marketing provision crops. During this transitionary period, it became clear to women that working conditions on the estates would not improve for them. The plantation managers' inability to adjust to free labour resulted in a significant withdrawal of female labourers after 1 August 1838. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/experiences-of-women-estate-workers-during-the-apprenticeship-period-in-st-vincent-1834-38-the-transition-from-slavery-to-freedom aJournal02330nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501040021126000340031530000230034949000480037252012290042050000330164953800360168265000140171865000300173265000310176265000240179365000220181765000290183985601240186897500120199209699082.2013.864152UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09699082.2013.864152 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFelicia Hemans's Feminist Poetry Of The Mid 1820Sh[electronic resource] /cJames Holt McGavran Jr. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's Writing ;vVolume 21, Issue 4, 2014 aDuring the mid 1820s, Felicia Hemans became an ardent, if conflicted, feminist who wrote two long poems and several shorter ones in which she railed thrillingly against the mortal dangers for British families inherent in the testosterone-driven ideology of manly patriotic sacrifice, and argued instead for the life-giving and life-restoring power to be found in woman-centered, but regendered, images of home, community and peace. The author concentrates on two major works: The Siege of Valencia (1823), Hemans's most often misunderstood long poem, and The Forest Sanctuary (1825), in which she takes her vision of a regendered future the furthest. However, the author also examines several of her short lyrics, including the two best known--"Casabianca" (1826) and "The Homes of England" (1827)--along with a few of the harrowing suicide poems from Records of Woman (1828), where aggrieved women dramatically kill themselves (and sometimes their children) to express rage and despair against the men in their lives. Whatever stories these poems tell, and however much her feminism flew beneath both the popular and critical radar, they radiate excoriating irony directed towards the patriarchal establishment of her time. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/felicia-hemanss-feminist-poetry-of-the-mid-1820s aJournal01162nam a2200313Ia 450000100220000000300080002200500170003000600190004700700150006600800410008102400340012204000210015605000170017708200190019424501370021326000340035030000230038449000480040750000330045553800360048865000140052465000300053865000310056865000240059965000220062365000290064585601620067497500120083600497878.1990.9978817UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/00497878.1990.9978817 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFeminine authorship and spiritual authority in Victorian women writers' autobiographiesh[electronic resource] /cMary Jean Corbett. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's Studies ;vVolume 18, Issue 1, 1990 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/feminine-authorship-and-spiritual-authority-in-victorian-women-writers-autobiographies aJournal01099nam a2200313Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501030020526000340030830000230034249000600036550000330042553800360045865000140049465000300050865000310053865000240056965000220059365000290061585601290064497500120077308905498908583295UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/08905498908583295 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFeminism and the family in nineteenth́century studiesh[electronic resource] /cJohanna M. Smith. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aNineteenth Century Contexts ;vVolume 13, Issue 1, 1989 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/feminism-and-the-family-in-nineteenth-century-studies aJournal02536nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501770021126000340038830000230042249000580044552012780050350000330178153800360181465000140185065000300186465000310189465000240192565000220194965000290197185601980200097500120219809574042.2010.513489UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09574042.2010.513489 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFeminism in Another Languageh[electronic resource] :bLearning from 'Feminist' Histories of Iran and/or from Histories of Iranian 'Feminism' since 1830 /cJoanna de Groot. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen: A Cultural Review ;vVolume 21, Issue 3, 2010 aThis article draws on the experience of investigating and interpreting histories of 'women', 'feminists' and 'feminism' in Iran during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In particular it will consider the possibilities and limitations of cross-cultural uses of the category 'feminist' by historians in relation to the 'fracturing' or, as I would argue, 'complexification' of that category, and of the category 'woman/women' within recent scholarship. At a time when 'Islamophobic' and racialised analyses of Middle Eastern cultures, or world-views influenced by Islam, intersect with creative, if contentious, debates about the nature, value or even possibility of something called 'Islamic feminism', a historicised discussion of this question is timely and relevant. By considering histories of Iranian 'women' and/or 'feminists', those interested in the possibilities and problems of 'feminist history' can enrich their discussions of its conceptual underpinnings and actual practices. I will show how commonly used notions, such as 'protest', 'gender', 'modernity' and 'femininity', can be refined and enhanced by critical cross-cultural comparison, and will suggest some possible routes through the minefields of ethnocentric universalism and cultural relativism. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/feminism-in-another-language-learning-from-feminist-histories-of-iran-and-or-from-histories-of-iranian-feminism-since-1830 aJournal01857nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624500850020526000340029030000230032449000540034752007840040150000330118553800360121865000140125465000300126865000310129865000240132965000220135365000290137585601150140497500120151909612029400200049UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612029400200049 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFeminist biography and feminist historyh[electronic resource] /cBarbara Caine. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 3, Issue 2, 1994 aThis article seeks to explore the relationship between biography and the many new developments evident in feminist history. Taking as its particular focus the history of nineteenth- and twentieth-century English feminism, it looks at the divergence between an approach to biography which assumes it to be concerned with the lives of exceptional individuals and an interest in the history of feminism which has ceased to regard it as being the story of heroic victories on the way to women's emancipation. The growing interest in the lives, experiences and activities of past feminists who were not the leaders of major national campaigns suggests a new approach in general to the biographies of feminists - exploring how they lived and understood the broader situation of women aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/feminist-biography-and-feminist-history aJournal02248nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501280021126000340033930000230037349000550039652010840045150000330153553800360156865000140160465000300161865000310164865000240167965000220170365000290172585601560175497500120191009612025.2010.502398UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612025.2010.502398 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFeminist Inheritances and Foremothersh[electronic resource] :bthe beginnings of feminism in modern India /cPadma Anagol. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 19, Issue 4, 2010 aThis article illumines the nature and content of modern Indian feminism, tracing its beginnings in the great nineteenth-century social and religious reform movements in Maharashtra, Western India. Early feminist theory is tracked in the theories of women's subordination proposed by Christian and Hindu feminists. The linguistic sophistication in feminist genealogy is revealed through women's critiques of Indian society and gender relations, especially the formation of two key feminist concepts: condition of the 'stri-jati' (womankind) and 'bhaginivarg' (sisterhood), aided by the 'women's press' in the Marathi language. Their attacks on the shastras (religious texts) is considered as an important marker in their progression towards feminism. The article closes with an examination of women's self-assertion movements through the utilisation of law courts. In doing so, it counters the current historiography by arguing that if Indian patriarchy felt under siege during the Age of Consent (1891) controversy, it can only be explained by the threat posed by women's agency. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/feminist-inheritances-and-foremothers-the-beginnings-of-feminism-in-modern-india aJournal02228nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224500980021126000340030930000230034349000590036652011190042550000330154453800360157765000140161365000300162765000310165765000240168865000220171265000290173485601270176397500120189003054985.2011.621684UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/03054985.2011.621684 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFeminist thinking on education in Victorian Englandh[electronic resource] /cLaura Schwartz. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aOxford Review of Education ;vVolume 37, Issue 5, 2011 aThis article examines some of the conversations that took place between women's rights advocates on the subject of female education. The relationship between Victorian feminism and educational reform was a complex one, and historians have long argued over whether campaigns for women's schools and colleges can be termed 'feminist'. This article maintains, however, that it is possible to identify a current of feminist analyses, ideas and debates which formed an important part of the broader movement for women's education. 'Theory' in this context was driven less by individual thinkers than by networks in dialogue with each other, responding to a clear practical agenda. Clusters of educational reformers were distinguished by their varying religious outlooks, attitudes to sexual difference, the kind of education they advocated, and their relationship to the wider movement for women's emancipation. This article focuses primarily on higher education, and particularly on the Oxbridge women's colleges, as arenas in which some of these themes and disagreements were most prominently and clearly articulated. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/feminist-thinking-on-education-in-victorian-england aJournal02208nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501350020526000340034030000230037449000550039752010460045250000330149853800360153165000140156765000300158165000310161165000240164265000220166665000290168885601530171797500120187009612020400200411UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612020400200411 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aForgotten feministh[electronic resource] :bClaude Vignon (1828́1888), revolutionary and femme de lettres /cDavid Allen Harvey. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 13, Issue 4, 2004 aClaude Vignon (n©♭e No©♭mi Cadiot) was both an active protagonist in the feminist movement of 1848 and a prolific, if now forgotten, writer later in the century. Her political and literary careers and her personal life, notably her separation from romantic socialist and future occultist Alphonse-Louis Constant, provide a new perspective on the split between romantic socialism and early feminism after 1848. Many of the themes of Vignon's work, such as women's lack of control over their own property, subordination in marriage and the impossibility of divorce, and the double standards of nineteenthcentury society, reflect concerns relevant to the work of contemporary feminist scholars of the period. Rooting her literary work firmly in her own experiences of hope, frustration and desire, Vignon offered a feminist response to the misogyny of nineteenth-century French society, and also to the idealization and marginalization of women offered by the male romantic socialists with whom she was intimately acquainted in her youth. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/forgotten-feminist-claude-vignon-1828-1888-revolutionary-and-femme-de-lettres aJournal02134nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501970021126000340040830000230044249000550046552008370052050000330135753800360139065000140142665000300144065000310147065000240150165000220152565000290154785602200157697500120179609612025.2010.502396UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612025.2010.502396 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aForgotten Transnational Connections and National Contextsh[electronic resource] :ban 'entangled history' of the political transfers that shaped Belgian feminism, 1890́1914 /cJulie Carlier. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 19, Issue 4, 2010 aThe history of Belgian feminism before World War I has hitherto been written almost exclusively from within a national framework. Using the perspective of 'entangled history', this article focuses on the forgotten transnational influences that shaped the pre-war movement for women's rights in Belgium, starting with the Dutch and French political transfers that triggered the birth of organised feminism in the early 1890s, followed by the interventions of the International Council of Women and the International Woman Suffrage Alliance aimed at creating a Belgian affiliation. This entangled history profoundly upsets the prevailing categorisation of socialist versus so-called 'bourgeois' feminism and thus contributes to the growing international body of work that criticises these accepted concepts in feminist historiography. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/forgotten-transnational-connections-and-national-contexts-an-entangled-history-of-the-political-transfers-that-shaped-belgian-feminism-1890-1914 aJournal02244nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501510020526000340035630000230039049000540041352010480046750000330151553800360154865000140158465000300159865000310162865000240165965000220168365000290170585601720173497500120190609612029300200032UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612029300200032 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFrances gillam holden and the children's hospital dispute, 1887h[electronic resource] :bwoman's sphere, feminism and nursing /cAlison Bashford. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 2, Issue 3, 1993 aThis paper examines the confrontations of a late nineteenth-century 'lady superintendent' with men and masculinity. It analyses the problematical links between femininity, feminism and 'reformed' nursing, in a period when the latter two were emerging from the first. A central focus is the extent to which the discourse of 'woman's sphere' was meaningful for such single, employed, middle-class women as the subject of this paper, Frances Gillam Holden, in the specific context of hospitals and professional health care. This paper argues that such a discourse informed her challenges to male/medical professional power and her bids for authority and recognition in her workplace. Ultimately this challenge failed, in that male/medical power was vigorously reasserted. However, such attempts suggest the gradual shifts in late nineteenth-century constructions of femininity and domesticity towards the possibility of feminism, not only in the familiar suffrage struggles, but also in such obscure locations as the Children's Hospital in Sydney aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/frances-gillam-holden-and-the-childrens-hospital-dispute-1887-womans-sphere-feminism-and-nursing aJournal02441nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501070021126000340031830000230035249000480037552013270042350000330175053800360178365000140181965000300183365000310186365000240189465000220191865000290194085601340196997500120210309699082.2011.553264UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09699082.2011.553264 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFRANCES TROLLOPE'S ONE FAULT AND THE EVOLUTION OF THE NOVELh[electronic resource] /cElsie B. Michie. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's Writing ;vVolume 18, Issue 2, 2011 aThis article positions Frances Trollope's One Fault (1840) between Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice (1813) and Anthony Trollope's He Knew He Was Right (1869). All three novels depict a marriage between a man who is significantly wealthier and of higher social status than the woman he chooses for love. As a sequence, the three show the gradual erosion of the husband's power. In the novels by Frances and Anthony Trollope, this portrait of a failure of marital power becomes a means of representing in fiction the challenges to social authority that were perceived to have been brought about by the legislative reforms of the nineteenth century. One Fault references the passage of the Reform Act in 1832, He Knew He Was Right that of the Second Reform Act in 1867. Comparing these two novels reveals changes in the perceived structure of marriage and of the relation between the classes that took place between the 1830s and '40s and the 1860s. The novel accommodated itself to these social forms by developing new conceptions of character and a new plot structure. These formal inventions allow the Trollopes to represent social and personal authority as dispersed over a range of positions rather than concentrated in a single place, the space typically represented by the husband as the emblem of patriarchal values. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/frances-trollopes-one-fault-and-the-evolution-of-the-novel aJournal02139nam a2200325Ia 450000100220000000300080002200500170003000600190004700700150006600800410008102400340012204000210015605000170017708200190019424501100021326000340032330000230035749000480038052010210042850000330144953800360148265000140151865000300153265000310156265000240159365000220161765000290163985601330166897500120180100497878.1993.9978988UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/00497878.1993.9978988 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFrances Wrighth[electronic resource] :bThe other woman of early American feminism /cMolly Abel Travis. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's Studies ;vVolume 22, Issue 3, 1993 aThis paper focuses on Frances Wright, the first woman to lecture publicly in the U.S. to "promiscuous" audiences, those audiences composed of both sexes united in a public place. Despite her achievement, Wright has been ignored in historical analyses of nineteenth-century feminist rhetoric, I argue that historians have avoided Wright because she differs radically from those feminists who directly succeed her. As the Other Woman of the women's movement, Wright practiced a rhetoric imbued with the ideals of the Enlightenment and Owenite socialism. She publicly interrogated the cult of domesticity and demanded equal rights for women at a time when gender anxiety was Intense. Wright caused a furor and provided a negative example for later nineteenth-century feminists, most of whom developed "womanly" strategies of accommodation. I conclude that it is precisely because of her otherness that Wright is important, historically significant because she was marginalized and silenced within the feminist movement. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/frances-wright-the-other-woman-of-early-american-feminism aJournal02745nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501590021126000340037030000230040449000550042752015250048250000330200753800360204065000140207665000300209065000310212065000240215165000220217565000290219785601810222697500120240709612025.2010.509162UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612025.2010.509162 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFreethought, Free Love and Feminismh[electronic resource] :bsecularist debates on marriage and sexual morality, England c. 1850́1885 /cLaura Schwartz. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 19, Issue 5, 2010 aThis article examines the previously unexplored current of Freethinking feminism in the second half of the nineteenth century. Active in the women's movement of this period, Freethinking feminists were nonetheless viewed as a liability--an attitude that contributed to their exclusion from much of the subsequent historiography. Such marginalisation was due not only to their vocal opposition to all forms of religion, but also their openness to discussing new ways of organising heterosexual relationships. This article focuses on Freethinking feminist critiques of marriage and support for free unions. It demonstrates that these issues continued to be debated in the Secularist movement at a time when many other radical organisations--including much of the women's movement--kept silent on such topics. In this way, Freethinking feminists kept alive the more radical and libertarian critiques of traditional sexual morality developed by Owenite feminists in the 1830s and 40s. The author argues that the ideology of Freethought propelled its adherents to readdress questions of sex within a new 'Secularist' ethical framework. Fierce debate ensued, yet commitment to freedom of discussion ensured that 'unrespectable', libertarian voices were never entirely silenced. Freethinking feminism might, then, be viewed as the 'missing link' between early nineteenth-century feminist visions of greater sexual freedom and the more radical discussions of sexuality and free love that began to emerge at the fin de si©·cle. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/freethought-free-love-and-feminism-secularist-debates-on-marriage-and-sexual-morality-england-c-1850-1885 aJournal01929nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501210020526000340032630000230036049000540038352007910043750000330122853800360126165000140129765000300131165000310134165000240137265000220139665000290141885601440144797500120159109612020000200255UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612020000200255 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFresh attractions'h[electronic resource] :bwhite slaveryand feminism in New Zealand, 1885́1918 /cBronwyn Dalley. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 9, Issue 3, 2000 aNew Zealand women participated in an international debate over white slavery from the late nineteenth century. Features of that debate were common to several countries, but local commentators drew upon New Zealand's colonial position to evoke images of old-world ills in a new country. Ironically, however, New Zealand women were not convinced of the existence of white slavery in their country. As part of a catalogue of men's sexual and social oppression of women, the portrayal of gender relations in the anti-white slavery campaign was stark, but deliberate. In their demands that men take responsibility for ensuring that women had the right to walk the streets in safety, New Zealand feminists deployed the rhetoric of white slavery to argue for women's sexual and social freedom. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/fresh-attractions-white-slaveryand-feminism-in-new-zealand-1885-1918 aJournal01763nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501410021126000340035230000230038649000550040952005720046450000330103653800360106965000140110565000300111965000310114965000240118065000220120465000290122685601700125597500120142509612025.2012.751768UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612025.2012.751768 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aGendering the Historiography of the Suffragette Movement in Edwardian Britainh[electronic resource] :bsome reflections /cJune Purvis. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 22, Issue 4, 2013 aThe historiography of the British women's suffrage campaign is contested ground. This article, written by a feminist historian, contributes to the debate by offering some reflections on the writing of the history of the suffragette movement in Edwardian Britain during the twenty years or so that it has been the focus of her research. In particular, it critiques the gendered 'masculinist' approaches to the writing of the suffragette pasts and discusses some of the public and private debates that the author has been engaged in, when challenging such perspectives. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/gendering-the-historiography-of-the-suffragette-movement-in-edwardian-britain-some-reflections aJournal02343nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501140020526000340031930000230035349000550037652012150043150000330164653800360167965000140171565000300172965000310175965000240179065000220181465000290183685601400186597500120200509612020100200279UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612020100200279 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aGendering the unionh[electronic resource] :bimperial feminism and the ladies' land league /cMargaret Ward. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 10, Issue 1, 2001 aThe Act of Union of 1800, establishing Westminster control over Irish affairs, had important repercussions for the development of feminism within nineteenth-century Ireland, as well as contributing towards adifferentiation of Irish from British feminism. Feminism within Ireland was shaped by class, religion and racial identification: one strand followed theBritish model of Protestant philanthropy, while the other was concerned with asserting women's right to take part in nationalist political struggle. 'Imperial' feminists in Britain and Ireland, concerned with establishing their right to take part in the affairs of the 'nation', perceived those Irish who rejected British imperial rule as uncivilised, reserving sympathy for those whose economic position was threatened by the activities of those who campaigned against the landlord system. The period of the Land War of 1879 - 82 illustrates these conflicting discourses. The subsequent decline of imperial power in Ireland can be traced through a gradual change within Irish feminism from an initial support for the Union to a later embrace of nationalism, as young middle-class women, many from Catholic backgrounds, became involved in the movement aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/gendering-the-union-imperial-feminism-and-the-ladies-land-league aJournal02629nam a2200325Ia 45000010017000000030008000170050017000250060019000420070015000610080041000760240029001170400021001460500017001670820019001842450124002032600034003273000023003614900047003845201497004315000033019285380036019616500014019976500030020116500031020416500024020726500022020966500029021188560144021479750012022910969908960030202UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/0969908960030202 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aGeorge Eliot, Straight Drag and the Masculine Investments of Feminismh[electronic resource] /cSherri Catherine Smith. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's Writing ;vVolume 3, Issue 2, 1996 aEquality politics has become something of a high stakes inquiry in recent feminist work on phallocentrism and knowledge critique. Because of George Eliot's unwillingness to countenance the egalitarian feminist politics of her own day, the masculinism that characterized her personal and professional life is, indeed, puzzling. But I argue that Eliot's uneasy position suggests a more nuanced understanding of the binary that underwrites gender hierarchy, an understanding which gives as much weight to the meaning as to the shape of gender. Judith Butler's theory of gender performativity provides a counterweight to my discussion of Eliot's "straight drag," a pattern of social self-positioning that demands a sharp aesthetic sensibility for the formal unity of gender (that is, the commerce between form and idea, between what "manliness" looks like and what masculinity means historically and politically). While Eliot's essays and letters espouse a feminist, position that is open to the charge of misogyny in its commitment to individualism and its circumvention of feminist collectivity, Eliot's work also registers the possibility that the misogynist traces in such lone-star tactics are not only unavoidable but necessary to feminism, that the willingness to risk the possibility of such byproducts becomes the measure of feminism's readiness for further strategic investment in the institutions and knowledges that have worked to subordinate women both as individuals and as a group. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/george-eliot-straight-drag-and-the-masculine-investments-of-feminism aJournal02729nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501410020526000340034630000230038049000550040352015480045850000330200653800360203965000140207565000300208965000310211965000240215065000220217465000290219685601660222597500120239109612020300200364UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612020300200364 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aHand in hand with the women, forward we will go'h[electronic resource] :bwelsh nationalism and feminism in the 1890s /cJames Keating. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 12, Issue 3, 2003 aThis article explores the history of women's liberalism in Wales in the 1880s and 1890s, during the period of the Liberal nationalist movement known as Cymru Fydd or Young Wales. The Welsh Union of Women's Liberal Associations (WUWLA) was founded in 1892 to provide an important bloc of votes for the Progressive (Suffragist) faction in the Women's Liberal Federation, but its aims combined Liberal, Nationalist and feminist objectives. This article argues that briefly, and uniquely, in the 1890s, the WUWLA was able to bring together feminism and nationalism in British party politics, despite some opposition from its own nationalist members. The active intervention of women ensured that the masculinist language of nationalism shifted to an emphasis on equality of the sexes. In 1895, Cymru Fydd, embodied in the Welsh National Federation, espoused women's suffrage among its objects, and gave women's organisations special representation in its structures. This change is explored both through the writings and the events - a series of meetings and conferences - which led to the formation of both the WUWLA and the Welsh National Federation. But the weakness of liberalism at the end of the 1890s, together with divisions within Wales, meant that the new politics was short lived. The decline of women's national organisation after this period, though not fully explored here, can be linked to those problems, but also to the rifts created between Liberals, women and men, over the issue of women's suffrage in the Edwardian period. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/hand-in-hand-with-the-women-forward-we-will-go-welsh-nationalism-and-feminism-in-the-1890s aJournal01166nam a2200313Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501410020526000340034630000230038049000600040350000330046353800360049665000140053265000300054665000310057665000240060765000220063165000290065385601580068297500120084008905498808583286UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/08905498808583286 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aHannah and her sisterh[electronic resource] :bWomen and evangelicalism in early nineteenth́century England /cBeth KowaleskíWallace. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aNineteenth Century Contexts ;vVolume 12, Issue 2, 1988 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/hannah-and-her-sister-women-and-evangelicalism-in-early-nineteenth-century-england aJournal01209nam a2200313Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501600020526000340036530000230039949000530042250000330047553800360050865000140054465000300055865000310058865000240061965000220064365000290066585601890069497500120088300467600050120315UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/00467600050120315 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aHarriet Martineau and her contemporariesh[electronic resource] :bpast studies and methodological questions on historical surveys of women /cGaby Weiner. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aHistory of Education ;vVolume 29, Issue 5, 2000 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/harriet-martineau-and-her-contemporaries-past-studies-and-methodological-questions-on-historical-surveys-of-women aJournal01986nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501290020526000340033430000230036849000540039152008210044550000330126653800360129965000140133565000300134965000310137965000240141065000220143465000290145685601630148597500120164809612029500200074UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612029500200074 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aHeterosexuality, feminism and The Freewoman journal in early twentieth-century Englandh[electronic resource] /cLucy Bland. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 4, Issue 1, 1995 aIn 1911 a new feminist paper appeared called The Freewoman. Its life was short, its circulation small, but its reputation was notorious and its influence of some significance in feminist and radical circles. The paper's notoriety stemmed largely from its open discussion of sex, or rather heterosexuality, since lesbianism and homosexuality were barely mentioned. Combining older feminist concerns with newer sexological concepts, women and men discussed the meaning of sex: the relationship between sex and reproduction, the vices and virtues of birth control, passion, chastity, self-control, masturbation, the spirituality of ideal sex. During this brief moment, The Freewoman discussed sex "loudly and clearly and repeatedly", to quote Rebecca West: it was to be a long time before feminists were to do so again. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/heterosexuality-feminism-and-the-freewoman-journal-in-early-twentieth-century-england-1 aJournal02271nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501270020526000340033230000230036649000540038952011210044350000330156453800360159765000140163365000300164765000310167765000240170865000220173265000290175485601500178397500120193309612029200200001UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612029200200001 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900ahistory' is nowh[electronic resource] :bfeminist theory and the production of historical feminisms /cAntoinette Burton. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 1, Issue 1, 1992 aOver the last decade, feminist practitioners across a variety of disciplines have been invoking history as an important grounding for both feminist politics and feminist theory. At the same time, however, insufficient account is taken of the extent to which standardized versions of 'the feminist past' are being invoked to represent a wide variety of feminist experiences and an equally heterogeneous set of historical circumstances and cultural contexts. It is suggested that if feminist reconceptualizations of history are to be taken seriously - if, in other words, history is the production of knowledges about the past and is itself contingent on the conditions of the present - feminist theorists must begin to reference both the imperial legacies of Anglo-European feminism and the multiplicity of feminist movements around the world. Only when feminists of all disciplinary persuasions begin to acknowledge the complex historical legacies of modern feminisms and situate their own critiques within them will feminist theory be properly grounded in, and responsive to, the exigencies of feminist history. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/history-is-now-feminist-theory-and-the-production-of-historical-feminisms1 aJournal02400nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501460021126000340035730000230039149000550041452011990046950000330166853800360170165000140173765000300175165000310178165000240181265000220183665000290185885601750188797500120206209612025.2010.502403UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612025.2010.502403 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aInternational Feminisms in Historical Comparative Perspectiveh[electronic resource] :bFrance, Italy and Portugal, 1880ś1930s /cAnne Cova. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 19, Issue 4, 2010 aThis article approaches international feminisms in historical comparative perspective by looking at three feminist federations, called national councils of women, that were established in France, Italy and Portugal in 1901, 1903 and 1914, respectively. All of these organisations emerged from the International Council of Women, which had been founded in Washington in 1888 'to stimulate the sentiment of internationalism among women throughout the world', as an attempt to build a collective women's identity. The comparison between France, Italy and Portugal during the first three decades of the twentieth century must take into account the fact that the last two countries faced authoritarian regimes (fascist and Salazarist dictatorships, respectively) while, by contrast, France spent the period considered in this article under the Third Republic. After examining the origins of these three national councils of women, the focus will be on their common agenda, taking into account the national contexts to which they had to adapt themselves. The aim of this article is to contribute to the history of transnational feminisms and to a comparative women's history of the twentieth century. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/international-feminisms-in-historical-comparative-perspective-france-italy-and-portugal-1880s-1930s aJournal01970nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501420021126000340035330000230038749000550041052007820046550000330124753800360128065000140131665000300133065000310136065000240139165000220141565000290143785601660146697500120163209612025.2013.849142UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612025.2013.849142 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aJane Eyre's Daughtersh[electronic resource] :bthe feminist missions of Mary Carpenter and Josephine Butler in India /cChieko Ichikawa. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 23, Issue 2, 2014 aThe nineteenth-century literature served as a theatrical space wherein culture and politics merged to constitute women's subjectivity. Charlotte Bront©±'s literary imagination of the heroine's 'mission' in Jane Eyre heralded Mary Carpenter's reform of Indian women's education and Josephine Butler's campaign to repeal the Contagious Diseases Acts in India. This article explores the way in which the writings of both feminists betray imperial/anti-imperial and domestic/political aspects of their activities, as Bront©± represents such complex issues through the deliberate articulation of the protagonist's subject-position, seeking the configuration of the female political network which stemmed from Jane's individual engagement with nineteenth-century gender politics. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/jane-eyres-daughters-the-feminist-missions-of-mary-carpenter-and-josephine-butler-in-india aJournal01152nam a2200313Ia 45000010021000000030008000210050017000290060019000460070015000650080041000800240033001210400021001540500017001750820019001922450126002112600034003373000023003714900060003945000033004545380036004876500014005236500030005376500031005676500024005986500022006226500029006448560153006739750012008260191-6599(92)90078-QUtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1016/0191-6599(92)90078-Q aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aJohn Stuart Mill's the subjection of womenh[electronic resource] :bThe foundations of liberal feminism /cSusan Hekman. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aHistory of European Ideas ;vVolume 15, Issue 4-6, 1992 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/john-stuart-mills-the-subjection-of-women-the-foundations-of-liberal-feminism aJournal02522nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501520020526000340035730000230039149000550041452013210046950000330179053800360182365000140185965000300187365000310190365000240193465000220195865000290198085601750200997500120218409612020701707274UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612020701707274 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aJosephine Butler and the Making of Feminismh[electronic resource] :binternational abolitionism in the Netherlands (1870́1914) /cPetra De Vries. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 17, Issue 2, 2008 aThe history of Dutch abolitionism within the wider international context highlights the complex relationship between abolitionism and feminism. Feminism and abolitionism were intricately related, both playing a central role in discourses about sexuality and the State in the last decades of the nineteenth century. Josephine Butler's 'crusade' against the regulation of prostitution played a crucial role in the rise of Dutch evangelical feminism and inspired later generations of feminists to employ the image of the prostitute as the prime example of female sexual oppression and other gender inequalities. However, over a period of about twenty-five years the prostitution campaign drifted away from a feminist perspective and was characterised by tensions between male and female abolitionists. When regulation was abandoned around 1900 a new focus on traffic in women emerged, indicating a shift from 'prostitute' to 'white slave' together with a shift from abolitionism as a wider social movement in which women's rights were articulated to a campaign for limited legal goals, signifying also changes from a 'female' brand of abolitionism to a 'male' platform of state politics. During a successful campaign against brothel keeping the movement took a repressive turn and ultimately became less woman-friendly. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/josephine-butler-and-the-making-of-feminism-international-abolitionism-in-the-netherlands-1870-1914 aJournal02147nam a2200325Ia 45000010017000000030008000170050017000250060019000420070015000610080041000760240029001170400021001460500017001670820019001842450144002032600034003473000023003814900052004045200959004565000033014155380036014486500014014846500030014986500031015286500024015596500022015836500029016058560175016349750012018090954025890010104UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/0954025890010104 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aKnowledge is PoweŕUnitarians, gender and education in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries h[electronic resource] /cRuth Watts. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aGender and Education ;vVolume 1, Issue 1, 1989 aThis article attempts to show the importance of education to gender equality in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, and in particular, the relevance of the progressive views and practice of the Unitarians whose attitudes affected women generally both through their educational endeavours, especially in higher education, and through their pioneering efforts on women's rights. There were a number of limitations, however, to the Unitarians' contribution, not least their paternalistic attitudes to the working class coupled with their genuine upholding of the status and responsibility of motherhood which led them to restrict working-class women's role in practice even whilst promoting for them a better and wider education. Nevertheless, Unitarians made an outstanding early contribution to gender equality by seeking to provide women with the education which would enable them to develop their full potential and prove their equality. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/knowledge-is-power-unitarians-gender-and-education-in-the-eighteenth-and-early-nineteenth-centuries aJournal01158nam a2200313Ia 45000010021000000030008000210050017000290060019000460070015000650080041000800240033001210400021001540500017001750820019001922450130002112600034003413000023003754900060003985000033004585380036004916500014005276500030005416500031005716500024006026500022006266500029006488560155006779750012008320191-6599(94)90057-4UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1016/0191-6599(94)90057-4 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aLiberal ideals and feminist organisation in Victorian Englandh[electronic resource] :bOne cause or many? /cJoyce Pedersen. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aHistory of European Ideas ;vVolume 19, Issue 4-6, 1994 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/liberal-ideals-and-feminist-organisation-in-victorian-england-one-cause-or-many aJournal01668nam a2200325Ia 450000100150000000300080001500500170002300600190004000700150005900800410007402400270011504000210014205000170016308200190018024501190019926000340031830000230035249000480037552005500042350000330097353800360100665000140104265000300105665000310108665000240111765000220114165000290116385601380119297500120133000497870212950UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/00497870212950 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aLost Horizonsh[electronic resource] :bRereading and Reclaiming Victorian Women Writers /cNicola Diane Thompson. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's Studies ;vVolume 31, Issue 1, 2002 aThe girls of today cannot see themselves in Miss Yonge and that is their chief demand from literature -Edith Sichel, Monthly Review, May 1901 The depths to which the reputation of popular conservative Victorian novelist, Charlotte Yonge, had sunk by the end of the nineteenth century are reflected in Oscar Wilde's reaction to being told a condemned man was reading one of Yonge's novels: "My heart was turned by the eyes of the doomed man, but if he reads The Heir of Redclyffe it's perhaps as well to let the law take its course" (Ellman 202). aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/lost-horizons-rereading-and-reclaiming-victorian-women-writers aJournal01120nam a2200313Ia 450000100220000000300080002200500170003000600190004700700150006600800410008102400340012204000210015605000170017708200190019424501090021326000340032230000230035649000610037950000330044053800360047365000140050965000300052365000310055365000240058465000220060865000290063085601350065997500120079408164649.1988.9961606UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/08164649.1988.9961606 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aLouisa Lawson, Miles Franklin and Feminist writing, 1888́1901h[electronic resource] /cSusan Sheridan. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aAustralian Feminist Studies ;vVolume 3, Issue 7-8, 1988 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/louisa-lawson-miles-franklin-and-feminist-writing-1888-1901 aJournal01960nam a2200325Ia 450000100220000000300080002200500170003000600190004700700150006600800410008102400340012204000210015605000170017708200190019424501710021326000340038430000230041849000570044152007060049850000330120453800360123765000140127365000300128765000310131765000240134865000220137265000290139485601990142397500120162209589236.1994.9960563UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09589236.1994.9960563 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMasquerade, sisterhood and the dilemma of the feminist as artist and woman in late nineteenth́century British women's writingh[electronic resource] /cAnn Heilmann. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aJournal of Gender Studies ;vVolume 3, Issue 2, 1994 aFin-de-si©·cle feminist writers solved the dilemma of having to "defy the cultural definition of artist or woman if [they were] to remain artist[s] and wom[e]n" (Stewart, 1979, p. 14) by braving patriarchal notions of submissive femininity and male-engendered art in their own artistic lives, and by re-asserting their feminist beliefs in the personae of their protagonists. As women intending to create rather than be created by male society, their heroines sought to overcome gender boundaries, either by masquerading as men, or by replacing heterosexual power structures with the idea of an all-female community. Both cross-dressing and sisterhood necessitated an abnegation of (hetero)sexuality. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/masquerade-sisterhood-and-the-dilemma-of-the-feminist-as-artist-and-woman-in-late-nineteenth-century-british-womens-writing aJournal01111nam a2200313Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501120020526000340031730000230035149000600037450000330043453800360046765000140050365000300051765000310054765000240057865000220060265000290062485601320065397500120078508905498908583293UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/08905498908583293 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900a"Material witnessh[electronic resource] :b́ feminism and nineteenth́century studies /cKathy Psomiades. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aNineteenth Century Contexts ;vVolume 13, Issue 1, 1989 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/material-witness-feminism-and-nineteenth-century-studies aJournal02035nam a2200325Ia 450000100150000000300080001500500170002300600190004000700150005900800410007402400270011504000210014205000170016308200190018024501030019926000340030230000230033649000780035952009170043750000330135453800360138765000140142365000300143765000310146765000240149865000220152265000290154485601240157397500120169708038740117109UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/08038740117109 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMissionary women an feminism in Norway, 1906-1910h[electronic resource] /cLine Nyhagen Predelli. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aNordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research ;vVolume 9, Issue 1, 2001 aThis article presents evidence of direct links between the women's missionary movement and the feminist movement in early 20th-century Norway. Through the creation of the organization Misjonsarbeidernes Ring (MAR), missionary women sought allies and influence in the feminist movement both at home and abroad. The establishment of MAR, however, met with opposition from men in the leadership of the Norwegian Lutheran Missionary Society, with which the women's missionary movement in Norway was associated, from missionary women themselves, and from the feminist movement. The membership of MAR did not reach impressive numeric size, but the organization was an important development in the religious arena in Norway. Through their efforts to establish links between the women's missionary movement and the feminist movement, missionary women promoted the idea that religious women could have feminist interests. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/missionary-women-an-feminism-in-norway-1906-1910 aJournal02026nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501540020526000340035930000230039349000540041652008200047050000330129053800360132365000140135965000300137365000310140365000240143465000220145865000290148085601790150997500120168809612029600200100UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612029600200100 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMona Caird (1854-1932)h[electronic resource] :bwild woman, new woman, and early radical feminist critic of marriage and motherhood /cAnn Heilmann. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 5, Issue 1, 1996 aThis paper, which makes available previously unknown pictures and personal information drawn from interviews, introduces aspects of the life and work of a neglected First Wave feminist writer. In particular, it examines Caird's analysis of the social construction of marriage and motherhood and the dynamics of mother-daughter relationships. The conceptual framework within which Caird wrote, while being embedded in its historical context, bears striking resemblance to some theories within Second Wave thought, especially those of Carol Gilligan and Adrienne Rich. The paper addresses the problem of how to negotiate the danger of ahistoricism when establishing ideological and conceptual links between feminists of different historical periods, and argues for regarding Caird as a radical feminist in the making. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/mona-caird-1854-1932-wild-woman-new-woman-and-early-radical-feminist-critic-of-marriage-and-motherhood1 aJournal02108nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501140020526000340031930000230035349000540037652009800043050000330141053800360144365000140147965000300149365000310152365000240155465000220157865000290160085601410162997500120177009612029900200199UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612029900200199 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMothering feminism/mothering feministsh[electronic resource] :bray strachey and the cause /cBarbara Caine. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 8, Issue 2, 1999 aThe framework of motherhood raises interesting and important questions for feminist biography and for the history of feminism. Representations of motherhood have played an important part in defining particular kinds of feminism. But while images of sisterhood and close female friendship are integral to many recent discussions of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century feminism, cross-generational relationships between feminists and their mothers are only just beginning to be explored. In this article the author seeks to deal with both of these issues in a specific case study of Ray Strachey, exploring her feminist commitment and activity in terms of her relationship with her own mother, and with the other maternal figures to whom she was close. It is also argued that her complex negotiations with maternal figures affected the way in which she established a feminist tradition, and indeed depicted the whole history of British feminism in her major book, The Cause aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/mothering-feminism-mothering-feminists-ray-strachey-and-the-cause aJournal03039nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501230020526000340032830000230036249000480038552018990043350000330233253800360236565000140240165000300241565000310244565000240247665000220250065000290252285601500255197500120270109699080500200244UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09699080500200244 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aNarrative time, history, and feminism in mona caird's the daughters of danaush[electronic resource] /cLisa Surridge. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's Writing ;vVolume 12, Issue 1, 2005 aIn her article "Marriage" (1888), Mona Caird identified patriarchy as a historically contingent (rather than God-given) institution. Identifying the first societies as matriarchal, she argued that modern marriage began in the Reformation and was linked to commerce, competition, and the bourgeoisie. This article considers how Caird'ss evolutionary views on women and history play out in The Daughters of Danaus(1894). Set in the late-Victorian period but with a mythological title, Caird'ss novel calls attention to the relation between antiquity and modernity. Moreover, the text experiments radically with confusions and dislocations of narrative time. Part 1 collapses modern and primitive time as Hadria and her siblings dance a reel by moonlight in an ancient Scottish garret. Part 2 opens after an unexplained and unannounced lacuna of about eight years. Part 3 opens with a wholly subjective rendering of time as Hadria sees from her train to Paris the rhythmic passing of telegraph poles marking the "pulses of old Time" from her train to Paris. Finally, the text is marked by intense visual moments when narrative action virtually stops and characters freeze into figures in an extradiegetic visual landscape, as in Valeria'ss first sighting of Hadria or Hadria'ss vision of the woman from the train. These formal dislocations disturb the novel's realist discourse and hence imply a corresponding disturbance of the liberal-humanist ideology underlying nineteenth-century realism. The author argues that Caird places her women characters in experimental and often radical relationships with time and history. The Daughters of Danausthe author suggests, conveys an impressionistic and subjective view of time, critiquing the standardisation or rationalisation of time (commonly known as the phenomenon of "railway time") and suggesting the historically contingent nature of patriarchy. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/narrative-time-history-and-feminism-in-mona-cairds-the-daughters-of-danaus aJournal01106nam a2200313Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501130020526000340031830000230035249000600037550000330043553800360046865000140050465000300051865000310054865000240057965000220060365000290062585601260065497500120078008905499008583309UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/08905499008583309 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aNews from nowhere and victorian socialist feminismh[electronic resource] /cFlorence S. Boos, William Boos. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aNineteenth Century Contexts ;vVolume 14, Issue 1, 1990 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/news-from-nowhere-and-victorian-socialist-feminism aJournal02331nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501420020526000340034730000230038149000480040452011550045250000330160753800360164065000140167665000300169065000310172065000240175165000220177565000290179785601670182697500120199309699080400200236UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09699080400200236 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aOf harlots and housewivesh[electronic resource] :ba feminist materialist critique of the writings of wollstonecraft /cJulie Mcgonegal. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's Writing ;vVolume 11, Issue 3, 2004 aThe prostitute is a persistent, organising force in Wollstonecraft's writings, a fetishised figure as it were, whose repetitious recurrence betrays a conflicted attitude toward Wollstonecraft's endorsement of eradicating expressions of female sexuality. In A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792), the prostitute is also part of a rhetorical strategy: by drawing analogies between prostitutes and middle-class women, Wollstonecraft could present her radical attempt to restructure the English middle classes along gender lines as a conservative attempt to reform English society along class lines. It is a strategy that requires representing prostitutes as morally rather than materially endangered - a representation seriously at odds, it would seem, with Wollstonecraft's later Maria (1798), a text considerably less complicated by an appeal to cross-class female suffering than the earlier exegesis on female emancipation. Yet ultimately, in A Vindication and Maria both, working-class women, prostitutes included, are the mainstay of an envisioned society designed with the social and intellectual development of middle-class women in mind. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/of-harlots-and-housewives-a-feminist-materialist-critique-of-the-writings-of-wollstonecraft aJournal01182nam a2200313Ia 450000100220000000300080002200500170003000600190004700700150006600800410008102400340012204000210015605000170017708200190019424501410021326000340035430000230038849000610041150000330047253800360050565000140054165000300055565000310058565000240061665000220064065000290066285601650069197500120085608164649.1988.9961608UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/08164649.1988.9961608 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aOur deeply degraded sex' and the animal in man'h[electronic resource] :bRose Scott, feminism and sexuality 1890́1925 /cJudith Allen. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aAustralian Feminist Studies ;vVolume 3, Issue 7-8, 1988 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/our-deeply-degraded-sex-and-the-animal-in-man-rose-scott-feminism-and-sexuality-1890-1925 aJournal02120nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501390021126000340035030000230038449000570040752009330046450000330139753800360143065000140146665000300148065000310151065000240154165000220156565000290158785601660161697500120178209612025.2013.820599UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612025.2013.820599 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aOvercoming Inner Divisionh[electronic resource] :bpost-suffrage strategies in the organised German women's movement /cIngrid Sharp. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 23, Issue 3, 2014 aGerman women were working within a context strikingly different from either the USA or the UK following the granting of suffrage in 1918. Focusing on the largest of the bourgeois women's organisations, the Federation of Women's Associations (Bund Deutscher Frauenvereine, BDF), this article situates the post-suffrage strategies and priorities of the German women's movement within their particular national context. The BDF have been accused of failing to fully utilise the vote as a tool for change, but a study of their journal, Die Frau, shows that it was the weight of external factors that reduced the BDF's impact, rather than any failure of courage or commitment by the women. An overview of German press coverage of female suffrage before, during and after the war sets out the mental landscape within which the women were operating and gives for the first time a much-needed indication of public response to the issue. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/overcoming-inner-division-post-suffrage-strategies-in-the-organised-german-womens-movement aJournal02029nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501240020526000340032930000230036349000540038652008780044050000330131853800360135165000140138765000300140165000310143165000240146265000220148665000290150885601540153797500120169109612029900200220UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612029900200220 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPhysical purity feminism and state medicine in late nineteenth-century englandh[electronic resource] /cAnne L. Scott. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 8, Issue 4, 1999 aLate nineteenth-century England saw the development of a number of campaigns and social movements which were connected by both a hostility towards the medical profession and by the use of discourses of purity and sanitary reform. This article explores the involvement of women within these movements, analysing their activism as an aspect of social purity feminism. It argues that many of these movements drew on widespread female anxiety regarding male violence - both physical and sexual - towards women. The anti-medical feminists claimed that some pieces of 'sanitary' legislation represented a state-sanctioned violation of the bodies of women and children. Finally, this article analyses the use made, by some of these activists, of the discourses of sanitary reform to challenge the gender ordering associated with the reason/nature dualism in Victorian society. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/physical-purity-feminism-and-state-medicine-in-late-nineteenth-century-england aJournal01717nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501130021126000340032430000230035849000550038152005800043650000330101653800360104965000140108565000300109965000310112965000240116065000220118465000290120685601440123597500120137909612025.2012.658171UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612025.2012.658171 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPlace and Power in Irish Farms at the End of the Nineteenth Centuryh[electronic resource] /cKatie Barclay. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 21, Issue 4, 2012 aUsing an anthropological approach that views space as a cultural process created through the interaction between environment, the cultural meanings attached to those environments, and gendered bodies (with their own attached cultural meanings), this article explores how understandings of space in Ireland, and on the farm in particular, shaped women's role in farming households and more broadly in late nineteenth-century rural Ireland. It then raises questions about the implications of this for gendered interactions on the farm and for power relationships in the family. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/place-and-power-in-irish-farms-at-the-end-of-the-nineteenth-century1 aJournal02090nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501440021126000340035530000230038949000550041252009040046750000330137153800360140465000140144065000300145465000310148465000240151565000220153965000290156185601620159097500120175209612025.2013.780844UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612025.2013.780844 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPomeroy v. Pomeroyh[electronic resource] :bbeauty, modernity, and the female entrepreneur in fin-de-si©·cle London /cJessica P. Clark. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 22, Issue 6, 2013 aAs a fictional personality trading as 'Mrs Pomeroy', Jeannette Scal©♭ dominated London's elite beauty market through the late nineteenth century. By 1906, her control over the expansive commercial empire had collapsed, as new company owners publicly accused her of pecuniary ambitions unbefitting her sex. This article charts Scal©♭'s extraordinary transformation into London's leading complexion specialist, exploring the gender conventions regulating both the beauty business and middle-class female enterprise at the fin de si©·cle . An investigation of the 'Mrs Pomeroy' character reveals businesswomen's changing opportunities in England's 'modernizing' retail market, opportunities engendered through new systems of advertising, growing anonymity in the expanding urban scene, and novel forms of self-representation that did not necessarily impinge upon businesswomen's respectability. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/pomeroy-v-pomeroy-beauty-modernity-and-the-female-entrepreneur-in-fin-de-siecle-london aJournal02160nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501190020526000340032430000230035849000540038152010200043550000330145553800360148865000140152465000300153865000310156865000240159965000220162365000290164585601480167497500120182209612029200200013UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612029200200013 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPurifying' the public worldh[electronic resource] :bfeminist vigilantes in late Victorian England /cLucy Bland. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 1, Issue 3, 1992 aIn late nineteenth-century England, a number of feminists confronted prostitution through the closing of brothels and the expulsion of prostitutes from places of entertainment. Feminist historians have either understood this behaviour as reflective of feminist' powerlessness within the largely non-feminist movement for social purity, or they have neglected the behaviour and concentrated on the aspects of these women' work that appear more positive to feminists today. Neither approach attempts to understand why women took this more repressive stance and thought of it as feminist. To understand the actions of these women, it is necessary to recognise that their vision of a 'purified' public and private world was often informed by religious beliefs and adherence to temperance. Concern with the morality of public space also related to women' desire for safety in public places. And their 'repressive' and statist actions related in part to feminist philanthropist' changing attitude toward local government. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/purifying-the-public-world-feminist-vigilantes-in-late-victorian-england aJournal01176nam a2200313Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501400020526000340034530000230037949000600040250000330046253800360049565000140053165000300054565000310057565000240060665000220063065000290065285601690068197500120085008905499408583389UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/08905499408583389 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900a"Resolve to be a great paintresśh[electronic resource] :bWomen artists in relation to John Ruskin as critic and patron /cJan Marsh. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aNineteenth Century Contexts ;vVolume 18, Issue 2, 1994 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/resolve-to-be-a-great-paintress-women-artists-in-relation-to-john-ruskin-as-critic-and-patron aJournal01158nam a2200313Ia 450000100220000000300080002200500170003000600190004700700150006600800410008102400340012204000210015605000170017708200190019424501320021326000340034530000230037949000600040250000330046253800360049565000140053165000300054565000310057565000240060665000220063065000290065285601510068197500120083208905495.2015.1030837UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/08905495.2015.1030837 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSarah Ellis's The Women of Englandh[electronic resource] :bDomestic Happiness and Gender Performance /cCaroline Austin-Bolt. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aNineteenth Century Contexts ;vVolume 37, Issue 3, 2015 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/sarah-elliss-the-women-of-england-domestic-happiness-and-gender-performance aJournal02005nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501350020526000340034030000230037449000550039752008360045250000330128853800360132165000140135765000300137165000310140165000240143265000220145665000290147885601600150797500120166709612020801924563UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612020801924563 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSingular Leadershiph[electronic resource] :bAnna Howard Shaw, single women and the US woman suffrage movement /cTrisha Franzen. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 17, Issue 3, 2008 aWhen the Rev. Dr Anna Howard Shaw became president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), her status as a single, self-supporting woman forced changes in this organization, which had been dominated by economically dependent middle-class women. Yet Shaw did not fit into either acknowledged category of Progressive Era never-married women: the privileged and educated 'new woman' who chose to work and the working-class 'working woman' who labored out of necessity. This article argues that Shaw's liminal identity allowed her to bridge numerous constituencies and foster the needed changes in the NAWSA while also contributing to the redefinition of American womanhood. The problems of analyzing Shaw's life highlight the need for additional scholarship and theory on the category 'single' in women's history. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/singular-leadership-anna-howard-shaw-single-women-and-the-us-woman-suffrage-movement aJournal01141nam a2200313Ia 45000010020000000030008000200050017000280060019000450070015000640080041000790240032001200400021001520500017001730820019001902450123002092600034003323000023003664900060003895000033004495380036004826500014005186500030005326500031005626500024005936500022006176500029006398560147006689750012008150890549032000125255UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/0890549032000125255 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSpeaking volumesh[electronic resource] :bvictorian feminism and the appeal of public discussion /cJanice Schroeder. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aNineteenth Century Contexts ;vVolume 25, Issue 2, 2003 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/speaking-volumes-victorian-feminism-and-the-appeal-of-public-discussion aJournal02047nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501670020526000340037230000230040649000530042952008130048250000330129553800360132865000140136465000300137865000310140865000240143965000220146365000290148585601950151497500120170900467600500129583UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/00467600500129583 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSpecial strengths for their own special duties'h[electronic resource] :bwomen, higher education and gender conservatism in late Victorian Britain /cJulia Bush. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aHistory of Education ;vVolume 34, Issue 4, 2005 aThe article discusses contributions towards female higher education made by a group of women whose views on gender roles were conservative, rather than feminist or suffragist. Four women's conservative ideals and interconnected work for women's education are reviewed in the context of late Victorian Oxford. This study is prefaced by a discussion of historical literature on women's higher education which concludes that twentieth century feminist historians have sometimes downplayed the role of reformers who deliberately disassociated women's educational reform from the advance of gender equality. A study of conservative reformers complicates definitions both of feminism and anti-feminism, and provides an important reminder of the broader intellectual and political contexts which produced them both. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/special-strengths-for-their-own-special-duties-women-higher-education-and-gender-conservatism-in-late-victorian-britain aJournal01117nam a2200313Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501100020526000340031530000230034949000600037250000330043253800360046565000140050165000300051565000310054565000240057665000220060065000290062285601400065197500120079108905499208583342UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/08905499208583342 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSpectacular bodiesh[electronic resource] :bWomen in the discourse of the Saint́Simonians /cKari Weil. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aNineteenth Century Contexts ;vVolume 16, Issue 1, 1992 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/spectacular-bodies-women-in-the-discourse-of-the-saint-simonians aJournal02391nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501810021126000340039230000230042649000570044952011270050650000330163353800360166665000140170265000300171665000310174665000240177765000220180165000290182385602010185297500120205309612025.2014.964064UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612025.2014.964064 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aStopping the Traffich[electronic resource] :bthe National Vigilance Association and the international fight against the 'white slave' trade (1899́c.1909) /cRachael Attwood. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 24, Issue 3, 2015 aThe National Vigilance Association was the most prominent organization to take on the fight against sex trafficking in turn-of-the-century Britain. In 1899, it established and presided over the first global multidenominational anti-trafficking task force, the International Bureau for the Suppression of the White Slave Traffic (later Traffic in Persons). This article focuses on the configuration of the National Vigilance Association's anti-trafficking work during the formative years of the Bureau, paying particular attention to the relationship between the Association and the state. It sheds new light on the nature and significance of both the Association's role in the Bureau and the Association's domestic anti-trafficking operations. It exposes the way in which, while making notable advancements in the fight against trafficking, the Association brought an assumption of British superiority to its international work, and operated on the basis of a misdiagnosis of 'sexual exploitation' informed by a gender- and class-biased xenophobia, such as to detract from its commitment to the suppression of trafficking. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/stopping-the-traffic-the-national-vigilance-association-and-the-international-fight-against-the-white-slave-trade-1899-c-1909 aJournal01233nam a2200313Ia 4500001001600000003000800016005001700024006001900041007001500060008004100075024002800116040002100144050001700165082001900182245017700201260003400378300002300412490005300435500003300488538003600521650001400557650003000571650003100601650002400632650002200656650002900678856020000707975001200907004676099284546UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/004676099284546 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aStrategies of women teachers 1860́1920h[electronic resource] :bfeminization in Dutch elementary and secondary schools from a comparative perspective /cMineke Van Essen. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aHistory of Education ;vVolume 28, Issue 4, 1999 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/strategies-of-women-teachers-1860-1920-feminization-in-dutch-elementary-and-secondary-schools-from-a-comparative-perspective aJournal02130nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501680020526000340037330000230040749000550043052009020048550000330138753800360142065000140145665000300147065000310150065000240153165000220155565000290157785601860160697500120179209612020701707159UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612020701707159 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Abolitionist Struggle of Pastor Tommy Falloth[electronic resource] :bbetween social Christianity, feminism and secularism (1882́1893) /cFlorence Rochefort. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 17, Issue 2, 2008 aTommy Fallot (1844 - 1904) is a little-known figure in the history of French abolitionism; a recent discovery of private archives has made it possible to throw more light on his biography. This pioneer of social Christianity attempted to adapt abolitionism in France from the starting point of his Protestantism and his engagement with 'la la©cit©♭'--secularism. In 1882 he founded the Ligue fran©ʹaise pour le rel©·vement de la moralit©♭ publique, in which he hoped, in vain, to unite the different currents of abolitionism. He was for many years very energetic in the cause, and his activism took a feminist direction, but he finally gave up the Ligue and devoted himself to the campaign against pornography. Despite his setbacks, it was through Fallot that the Protestant milieu became sensitised to women's causes, and he marked out the first stages of a moderate feminist movement. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/the-abolitionist-struggle-of-pastor-tommy-fallot-between-social-christianity-feminism-and-secularism-1882-1893 aJournal02546nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501330021126000340034430000230037849000580040152013740045950000330183353800360186665000140190265000300191665000310194665000240197765000220200165000290202385601560205297500120220809574042.2010.513490UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09574042.2010.513490 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Bible and the Causeh[electronic resource] :bFreethinking Feminists vs Christianity, England, 1870́1900 /cLaura Schwartz. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen: A Cultural Review ;vVolume 21, Issue 3, 2010 aThis article examines Victorian debates on scriptural interpretation and women's rights, when feminists and anti-feminists, Christians and secularists battled over whether the Bible assigned women a subordinate sphere. It argues that scriptural debates were of central importance to the nineteenth-century 'woman question', while women's rights provided the discursive terrain upon which Christians and secularists competed for power and legitimacy. The article focuses on the contributions made by women activists in the secularist or freethought movement. These 'freethinking feminists' have been largely ignored in the historiography, though they formed a longstanding and active current within the Victorian women's movement. They were often marginalised, however, because of their violently anti-Christian views and their insistence that the Bible needed to be rejected in full for women to acquire freedom and equality. They argued not only with conservative Christians but with other activists in the women's movement who sought to demonstrate that women's rights could be reconciled with scriptural teachings. Highlighting this alternative tradition reveals the 'religious roots' of Victorian feminism to have been diverse and highly contested, and expands our understanding of the multiple processes by which modern definitions of 'secularism' came into being. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/the-bible-and-the-cause-freethinking-feminists-vs-christianity-england-1870-1900 aJournal01156nam a2200313Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501330020526000340033830000230037249000600039550000330045553800360048865000140052465000300053865000310056865000240059965000220062365000290064585601560067497500120083008905499508583421UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/08905499508583421 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900a"The care of the poor is her professiońh[electronic resource] :bHannah more and women's philanthropic work /cDorice Elliott. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aNineteenth Century Contexts ;vVolume 19, Issue 2, 1995 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/the-care-of-the-poor-is-her-profession-hannah-more-and-womens-philanthropic-work aJournal02347nam a2200325Ia 450000100220000000300080002200500170003000600190004700700150006600800410008102400340012204000210015605000170017708200190019424501950021326000340040830000230044249000560046552010480052150000330156953800360160265000140163865000300165265000310168265000240171365000220173765000290175985602210178897500120200909612025.2015.1039347UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612025.2015.1039347 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Defection of Women'h[electronic resource] :bthe New Zealand Contagious Diseases Act repeal campaign and transnational feminist dialogue in the late nineteenth century /cJames Keating. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 25, Issue 2, 2016 aOver the past decade, historians have situated feminist reformers' efforts to dismantle the British imperial contagious diseases apparatus at the heart of the transnational turn in women's history. New Zealand was an early emulator of British prostitution regulations, which provoked an organised repeal campaign in the 1880s, yet the colony is seldom considered in these debates. Tracing the dialogue concerning the repeal of contagious diseases legislation between British and New Zealand feminists in the 1890s, this article reaffirms the salience of political developments in the settler colonies for metropolitan reformers. A close reading of these interactions, catalysed by the Auckland Women's Liberal League's endorsement of the Act in 1895, reveals recently enfranchised New Zealand women's desire to act as model citizens for the benefit of metropolitan suffragists. Furthermore, it highlights the asymmetries that remained characteristic of the relationship between British feminists and their enfranchised Antipodean counterparts. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/the-defection-of-women-the-new-zealand-contagious-diseases-act-repeal-campaign-and-transnational-feminist-dialogue-in-the-late-nineteenth-century aJournal02297nam a2200325Ia 450000100220000000300080002200500170003000600190004700700150006600800410008102400340012204000210015605000170017708200190019424501110021326000340032430000230035849000470038152011730042850000330160153800360163465000140167065000300168465000310171465000240174565000220176965000290179185601390182097500120195900497878.1982.9978572UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/00497878.1982.9978572 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe failure of feminism in Greenwich Village before World War Ih[electronic resource] /cLeslie Fishbein. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's Studies ;vVolume 9, Issue 3, 1982 aOne crucial element of the cultural transformation which pre-World War I Greenwich Village radicals believed would pave the way for socialist revolution was the liberation of women, not only in political and economic terms, but also in terms of lifestyle. However, both male and female Village feminists found themselves shackled by vestiges of Victorianism and torn between visions of women as naturally maternal and pacifistic and other images of women which demanded sexual equality. The Village was a community supportive of the new feminism, but the variety of feminism that emerged from it suffered from the complacency of male feminists who believed that they could be patrons of feminism, the acceptance of inflated claims advanced by the women's movement, a tendency to accept sexual liberation in lieu of more profound socio-economic changes, and a failure to create a feminism relevant to the masses of working women in society at large. The young people who came to the Village in the 1920's were more interested in social rebellion than in social reform. Sexual freedom became the sum total of feminism; the end product of the New Freedom was the Flapper. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/the-failure-of-feminism-in-greenwich-village-before-world-war-i aJournal01789nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624500850020526000340029030000230032449000540034752007120040150000330111353800360114665000140118265000300119665000310122665000240125765000220128165000290130385601190133297500120145109612029700200146UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612029700200146 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe feminist challenge to socialist historyh[electronic resource] /cSue Clegg. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 6, Issue 2, 1997 aThis article argues that it is timely to revisit some of the debates between feminism and Marxism. While acknowledging the achievements of women's history, it is critical of attempts to ground feminist history in either patriarchy theory or post-structuralism. Developing from ideas about what constitutes a theory of history, it is argued that both patriarchy and post-structuralism cannot sustain a notion of historicity. The debate about protective legislation in nineteenth-century Britain is reviewed as an example of the divergence between Marxist and feminist interpretations. The article concludes with a defence of historical materialism as an explanatory framework in analysing women's oppression. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/the-feminist-challenge-to-socialist-history aJournal02317nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501120021126000340032330000230035749000480038052011940042850000330162253800360165565000140169165000300170565000310173565000240176665000220179065000290181285601380184197500120197909699082.2014.920136UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09699082.2014.920136 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Feminist Orientation in Edith Nesbit's Gothic Short Fictionh[electronic resource] /cVictoria Margree. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's Writing ;vVolume 21, Issue 4, 2014 aFor a long time critically neglected or disparaged, Edith Nesbit's Gothic fiction is beginning to receive the scholarly attention it deserves. This essay extends analysis beyond the much anthologized "Man-Size in Marble" (1893) to argue that a feminist orientation is in evidence more widely in her works of supernatural short fiction. A preoccupation with gender is discernible in several stories that offer distinct gender critiques, and in further tales through imagery of the dead female body and the female revenant, as well as through the recurrent character motifs of the female Cassandra and the male Frankenstein. The essay also argues that the anti-vivisectionism of several stories is an aspect of this feminist orientation. The article recognizes Nesbit as being a problematic figure for scholarly attempts to reclaim feminist authors, since she herself evinced ambivalence about the women's movement and the New Woman, but argues that the unleashing of Nesbit's most counter-hegemonic impulses in her Gothic writings points to the political significance of this generic form, making Nesbit a figure of substantial interest for scholars working on women's supernatural fiction. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/the-feminist-orientation-in-edith-nesbits-gothic-short-fiction aJournal01170nam a2200313Ia 45000010021000000030008000210050017000290060019000460070015000650080041000800240033001210400021001540500017001750820019001922450141002112600034003523000023003864900060004095000033004695380036005026500014005386500030005526500031005826500024006136500022006376500029006598560156006889750012008440191-6599(89)90213-1UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1016/0191-6599(89)90213-1 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Frauen-Zeitung (1849́52)h[electronic resource] :bHarmony and dissonance in mid-century German feminism /cCatherine M. Prelinger. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aHistory of European Ideas ;vVolume 11, Issue 1-6, 1989 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/the-frauen-zeitung-1849-52-harmony-and-dissonance-in-mid-century-german-feminism aJournal02196nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624502000020526000340040530000230043949000540046252008990051650000330141553800360144865000140148465000300149865000310152865000240155965000220158365000290160585602240163497500120185809612029800200178UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612029800200178 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900a"The great principle of english fair-plaýh[electronic resource] :bmale champions, the english women's movement and the admission of women to the pharmaceutical society in 1879 /cEllen Jordan. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 7, Issue 3, 1998 aAlthough the nineteenth-century women's movement in Britain was committed to opening male professions to women, pharmacy was not considered a likely target until it was discovered that certain men in the ruling body of the Pharmaceutical Society were sympathetic to their cause. Two young women already training to be hospital dispensers under the auspices of the Society for Promoting the Employment of Women were then encouraged to take the Pharmaceutical Society's examinations and apply for membership of the Society. The male champions who conducted a 7-year campaign for the admission of these women, although motivated by a commitment to gender equality, for strategic reasons limited their public rhetoric to appeals to justice, fairness and generosity. It is therefore suggested that the role of contingency and expediency in nineteenth-century feminist campaigns should be recognised. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/the-great-principle-of-english-fair-play-male-champions-the-english-womens-movement-and-the-admission-of-women-to-the-pharmaceutical-society-in-1879 aJournal02281nam a2200325Ia 45000010017000000030008000170050017000250060019000420070015000610080041000760240029001170400021001460500017001670820019001842450097002032600034003003000023003344900047003575201197004045000033016015380036016346500014016706500030016846500031017146500024017456500022017696500029017918560123018209750012019430969908960030302UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/0969908960030302 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe "New Womań Fiction and FińdéSi©·ck Feminismh[electronic resource] /cAnn Heilmann. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's Writing ;vVolume 3, Issue 3, 1996 aThis paper deals with a popular fin-de-si©·ck genre which reflected and fictionalized contemporary debates on the New Woman. In reclaiming the much-berated notion of propaganda literature, I argue that in its most typical form New Woman fiction was a female-authored and feminist genre. It was produced by and for women, and proved immensely successful as a means of promoting and popularizing the main concerns of the nineteeth-century women's movement. In defining the characteristics of the genre, I discuss the marked differences between feminist and anti-feminist writing of the fin de siecle. While ant-ifeminist works tended to be aesthetically one-dimensional, feminists wrote at the intersection of a number of textual traditions, such as the social document, the political pamphlet, auto/biography, and fiction. Male writers who concerned themselves with the New Woman colonized the genre in order to attack feminism and to explore misogynist sexual fantasies; femal anti-feminist novels were riddled with contradictions which reveal the ideological inconsistencies in their writers' lives. Neither group produced definitive New Woman fiction which was a committed feminist genre. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/the-new-woman-fiction-and-fin-de-sieck-feminism aJournal01173nam a2200313Ia 45000010020000000030008000200050017000280060019000450070015000640080041000790240032001200400021001520500017001730820019001902450139002092600034003483000023003824900060004055000033004655380036004986500014005346500030005486500031005786500024006096500022006336500029006558560163006849750012008470890549032000167844UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/0890549032000167844 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe pańeuropean fl©Øneuse in fińdési©·cle postersh[electronic resource] :bAdvertising modern women in the city /cRuth Iskin. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aNineteenth Century Contexts ;vVolume 25, Issue 4, 2003 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/the-pan-european-flaneuse-in-fin-de-siecle-posters-advertising-modern-women-in-the-city aJournal01133nam a2200313Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501200020526000340032530000230035949000600038250000330044253800360047565000140051165000300052565000310055565000240058665000220061065000290063285601460066197500120080708905499008583318UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/08905499008583318 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe power of the pedalh[electronic resource] :bThe bicycle and the turńof́thécentury woman /cMarilyn Bonnell. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aNineteenth Century Contexts ;vVolume 14, Issue 2, 1990 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/the-power-of-the-pedal-the-bicycle-and-the-turn-of-the-century-woman-1 aJournal02050nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501070020526000340031230000230034649000540036952009310042350000330135453800360138765000140142365000300143765000310146765000240149865000220152265000290154485601390157397500120171209612029500200073UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612029500200073 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe prison experiences of the suffragettes in Edwardian Britainh[electronic resource] /cJune Purvis. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 4, Issue 1, 1995 aThis article focuses in depth upon the prison experiences of the suffragettes in Edwardian Britain and challenges many of the assumptions that have commonly been made about women suffrage prisoners. Thus it is revealed that a number of the prisoners were poor and working-class women and not, as has been too readily assumed, bourgeois women. The assumption too that the women prisoners were single is challenged. Married women and mothers as well as spinsters, endured the harshness of prison life. Other differences between the women, such as disability and age, are also explored. Despite such differentiation, however, the women prisoners developed supportive networks, a culture of sharing and an emphasis upon the collectivity. Their courage, bravery and faith in the women's cause, especially when enduring the torture of forcible feeding and repeated imprisonments, should remain an inspiration to all feminists today. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/the-prison-experiences-of-the-suffragettes-in-edwardian-britain aJournal01789nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501110020526000340031630000230035049000540037352006650042750000330109253800360112565000140116165000300117565000310120565000240123665000220126065000290128285601400131197500120145109612029700200158UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612029700200158 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe religious context of the women's suffrage campaign in Irelandh[electronic resource] /cCliona Murphy. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 6, Issue 4, 1997 aThis article examines the relationship between the various Irish women's suffrage societies and the Christian churches. It looks at the attitudes of particular suffragists, organised groups and the clergy to the questions of not only granting women the vote but wider feminist issues as well. It argues that neither the women nor the clergy were predictable. There were suffragists who were anti-church and there were suffragists who formed organisations which closely reflected their religious affiliations. Some members of the clergy spoke out against the cause, but there were also a number who gave it their backing, though not always for feminist reasons. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/the-religious-context-of-the-womens-suffrage-campaign-in-ireland aJournal01137nam a2200313Ia 45000010017000000030008000170050017000250060019000420070015000610080041000760240029001170400021001460500017001670820019001842450127002032600034003303000023003644900053003875000033004405380036004736500014005096500030005236500031005536500024005846500022006086500029006308560152006599750012008110046760930220306UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/0046760930220306 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe role of education in the development of Black feminist thought, 1860́1920h[electronic resource] /cLinda M. Perkins. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aHistory of Education ;vVolume 22, Issue 3, 1993 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/the-role-of-education-in-the-development-of-black-feminist-thought-1860-1920 aJournal01954nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501760021126000340038730000230042149000550044452006970049950000330119653800360122965000140126565000300127965000310130965000240134065000220136465000290138685602010141597500120161609612025.2013.846113UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612025.2013.846113 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Spectacle of Woman as Creatorh[electronic resource] :brepresentation of women composers in the French, German and English feminist press 1880́1930 /cAmanda Harris. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 23, Issue 1, 2014 aThe period 1880 - 1930 saw women composers achieve unprecedented prominence as composers of large-scale works. This success coincided with the first wave of feminist movements in England, France and Germany. This article views the junctions where these two groups of women met through the vehicle of the feminist press, documenting the tensions and misunderstandings that occurred between emerging women composers attempting to be taken seriously as creative entities and feminists seeking to improve the political, social and professional lot of women. The pervasive aesthetic of male musical genius remained unquestioned by many feminists in spite of examples of female creative brilliance. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/the-spectacle-of-woman-as-creator-representation-of-women-composers-in-the-french-german-and-english-feminist-press-1880-1930 aJournal02530nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501720020526000340037730000230041149000550043452012940048950000330178353800360181665000140185265000300186665000310189665000240192765000220195165000290197385601900200297500120219209612020500200433UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612020500200433 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aTowards the formation of a professional identityh[electronic resource] :bwomen artists in Greece at the beginning of the twentieth century /cChariklia-Glafki Gotsi. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 14, Issue 2, 2005 aIn nineteenth-century Greece women of the upper and middle classes were usually occupied with some form of art destined for the private sphere of their familial or friendly circle or sold for philanthropic purposes. The foundation of a female class for painting and sculpture at the state School of Arts in Athens in 1894 seems to have given women the chance to demand and assure equal academic opportunities with men in the first decade of the twentieth century, despite strong objections from their opponents on the issue of the life-class. For some women this was the first step away from amateurism and towards professionalism and was to be followed by a series of initiatives, including the maintenance of a well-organised atelier, steady participation in exhibitions and artistic unions, the adoption of modern art tendencies and publicity through the press, all of which guaranteed their professional engagement with art. Next to contemporary feminist demands for emancipation and female attempts to enter traditionally male professions, women artists' endeavours contributed, as can be detected in some painted and photographic portraits of Flora, Laskaridou and Asprioti, to the formation of the image of the New Woman as well as to the promotion of female artistic individuality. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/towards-the-formation-of-a-professional-identity-women-artists-in-greece-at-the-beginning-of-the-twentieth-century aJournal01660nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501140020526000340031930000230035349000540037652005340043050000330096453800360099765000140103365000300104765000310107765000240110865000220113265000290115485601390118397500120132209612029300200041UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612029300200041 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aTransvestite feminismh[electronic resource] :bthe politics of the Australian Woman, 1894 /cSheridan Susan. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 2, Issue 3, 1993 aThe Australian Woman, an apparently radical feminist journal which appeared and disappeared in Sydney during 1894, suggests a hitherto unsuspected degree of outspokenness in the Australian women's rights movement of the 1890s. However, there is reason to question this interpretation. As is shown in this paper, a critical reading of the full text of the journal and of its political context raises questions about the nature of its feminism and these questions in turn point to a mystery surrounding the identity of its editors. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/transvestite-feminism-the-politics-of-the-australian-woman-1894 aJournal01232nam a2200313Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501690021126000340038030000230041449000580043750000330049553800360052865000140056465000300057865000310060865000240063965000220066365000290068585601920071497500120090609574042.2012.644488UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09574042.2012.644488 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aTying White Ribbons Around the Worldh[electronic resource] :bManchester's Temperance Women and Late-Nineteenth Century Transnational Feminism /cCynthia Belaskie. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen: A Cultural Review ;vVolume 23, Issue 1, 2012 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/tying-white-ribbons-around-the-world-manchesters-temperance-women-and-late-nineteenth-century-transnational-feminism aJournal02475nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224500960021126000340030730000230034149000580036452013750042250000330179753800360183065000140186665000300188065000310191065000240194165000220196565000290198785601210201697500120213709574042.2010.513491UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09574042.2010.513491 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aVictorian 'Anti-racism' and Feminism in Britainh[electronic resource] /cCaroline Bressey. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen: A Cultural Review ;vVolume 21, Issue 3, 2010 aTowards the end of the nineteenth century some individuals, such as the African-American Ida B. Wells, began to write about the close connections between racial prejudice and the politics of gender within the emerging civil rights and feminist movements. The historical geographies of such debates in Britain, debates that challenged racial prejudice within Britain, the British empire and in other parts of the globe, are relatively underexamined. Our knowledge of the extent to which these debates became aligned with first-wave feminist ideas is also limited. This article highlights one of the women, Catherine Impey, who was key to an emerging British discussion that critiqued racial prejudice in the British empire. Her journal, Anti-Caste, in which these discussions were aired was read by early feminists such as Wells and Isabella Ormston Ford. However, although Impey was supportive of some issues associated with the feminist movement, such as the demand for female suffrage, she is absent from feminist historiography. Through the example of the anti-caste movement, this article considers the extent to which the early feminist movement in Britain aligned itself with forms of prejudice beyond those of gender, and how the overlapping of such debates might have determined the extent to which Catherine Impey played a part in the emerging women's movement. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/victorian-anti-racism-and-feminism-in-britain aJournal02016nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501010020526000340030630000230034049000470036352009180041050000330132853800360136165000140139765000300141165000310144165000240147265000220149665000290151885601310154797500120167809699089700200009UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09699089700200009 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aVictorian feminism and the ghost of Mary Wollstonecrafth[electronic resource] /cBarbara Caine. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's Writing ;vVolume 4, Issue 2, 1997 aVictorian feminists rarely mentioned Mary Wollstonecraft and when they did attempted to distance themselves from her rather than to claim any connection with her. This avoidance did not mean that they knew nothing about her. On the contrary, private correspondence and the few published references to her suggest that she was well-known throughout the century, but more for her scandalous private life, as recounted by William Godwin, than for her ideas. This article explores nineteenth century responses to Wollstonecraft, arguing that while her ideas were not acknowledged, her life served as a constant and sometimes unwelcome reminder of the ways in which personal rebellion and feminist commitment were connected. It uses these responses to her in order to explore some of the difficulties involved in establishing a feminist tradition. Finally it looks at the rehabilitation of Wollstonecraft in the 1890s. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/victorian-feminism-and-the-ghost-of-mary-wollstonecraft aJournal01089nam a2200313Ia 450000100220000000300080002200500170003000600190004700700150006600800410008102400340012204000210015605000170017708200190019424501000021326000340031330000230034749000470037050000330041753800360045065000140048665000300050065000310053065000240056165000220058565000290060785601270063697500120076300497878.1972.9978298UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/00497878.1972.9978298 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aVictorian feminism and the nineteenth́century novelh[electronic resource] /cDonald D. Stone. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's Studies ;vVolume 1, Issue 1, 1972 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/victorian-feminism-and-the-nineteenth-century-novel aJournal01184nam a2200313Ia 45000010021000000030008000210050017000290060019000460070015000650080041000800240033001210400021001540500017001750820019001922450144002112600034003553000023003894900060004125000033004725380036005056500014005416500030005556500031005856500024006166500022006406500029006628560167006919750012008580191-6599(92)90060-PUtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1016/0191-6599(92)90060-P aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aVisions of a united Europeh[electronic resource] :bEuropean emancipatory women of the 19th and early 20th centuries /cGisela F. Ritchie. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aHistory of European Ideas ;vVolume 15, Issue 4-6, 1992 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/visions-of-a-united-europe-european-emancipatory-women-of-the-19th-and-early-20th-centuries aJournal01232nam a2200313Ia 450000100220000000300080002200500170003000600190004700700150006600800410008102400340012204000210015605000170017708200190019424501660021326000340037930000230041349000600043650000330049653800360052965000140056565000300057965000310060965000240064065000220066465000290068685601910071597500120090608905495.2015.1013080UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/08905495.2015.1013080 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900a"What are they to do with their lives?́h[electronic resource] :bAnglican Sisterhoods and Useful Angels in Three Novels by Charlotte Mary Yonge /cLivia Woods. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aNineteenth Century Contexts ;vVolume 37, Issue 2, 2015 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/what-are-they-to-do-with-their-lives-anglican-sisterhoods-and-useful-angels-in-three-novels-by-charlotte-mary-yonge aJournal01202nam a2200313Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501570020526000340036230000230039649000600041950000330047953800360051265000140054865000300056265000310059265000240062365000220064765000290066985601780069897500120087608905499308583358UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/08905499308583358 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWho wears the pants here? The policing of women's dress in nineteenth́century England, Germany and Franceh[electronic resource] /cGretchen van Slyke. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aNineteenth Century Contexts ;vVolume 17, Issue 1, 1993 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/who-wears-the-pants-here-the-policing-of-womens-dress-in-nineteenth-century-england-germany-and-france aJournal01153nam a2200313Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501320020526000340033730000230037149000600039450000330045453800360048765000140052365000300053765000310056765000240059865000220062265000290064485601540067397500120082708905490108583548UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/08905490108583548 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWhy Anna Letitia Barbauld refused to head a women's collegeh[electronic resource] :bNew facts, new story /cWilliam McCarthy. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aNineteenth Century Contexts ;vVolume 23, Issue 3, 2001 aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/why-anna-letitia-barbauld-refused-to-head-a-womens-college-new-facts-new-story aJournal02284nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501230021126000340033430000230036849000580039152011360044950000330158553800360161865000140165465000300166865000310169865000240172965000220175365000290177585601420180497500120194601916599.2012.725668UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/01916599.2012.725668 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWollstonecraft in Europe, 1792́1904h[electronic resource] :bA Revisionist Reception History /cEileen Hunt Botting. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aHistory of European Ideas ;vVolume 39, Issue 4, 2013 aIt has often been repeated that Wollstonecraft was not read for a century after her death in 1797 due to the negative impact of her husband William Godwin's Memoirs of the Author of a Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1798) on her posthumous reputation. By providing the first full-scale reception history of Wollstonecraft in continental Europe in the long nineteenth century--drawing on rare book research, translations of understudied primary sources, and Wollstonecraft scholarship from the nineteenth century to the present--this article applies a revised Rezeptionsgeschichte approach to tracing her intellectual influence on the woman question and organised feminism in Europe. Although the Memoirs and post-revolutionary politics everywhere dampened and even drove underground the reception of her persona and ideas in the first decades of the nineteenth century, Wollstonecraft's reception in nineteenth-century continental Europe, like the United States, was more positive and sustained in comparison to the public backlash she faced as a 'fallen woman' in her homeland of Britain through the bulk of the Victorian era. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/wollstonecraft-in-europe-1792-1904-a-revisionist-reception-history aJournal01835nam a2200325Ia 450000100210000000300080002100500170002900600190004600700150006500800410008002400330012104000210015405000170017508200190019224501280021126000340033930000230037349000550039652006750045150000330112653800360115965000140119565000300120965000310123965000240127065000220129465000290131685601520134597500120149709612025.2013.849143UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612025.2013.849143 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWoman Suffrage and Irish Nationalismh[electronic resource] :bethnic appeals and alliances in America /cTara M. McCarthy. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 23, Issue 2, 2014 aNationalism first brought Irish-American women into a political struggle in the late nineteenth century, a role that did not go unnoticed by suffragists, who reached out to Irish-Americans through sympathy with the Home Rule movement. These connections also continued into the twentieth century as the crisis of World War I converged with revolutionary nationalism and the final push for suffrage in America. A small group of nationalists and suffragists worked together and sought alliances in an environment where Irish-American men wielded political power and Irish-American women continued to be active in the nationalist movement beyond the Ladies' Land League era. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/woman-suffrage-and-irish-nationalism-ethnic-appeals-and-alliances-in-america aJournal01794nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501390020526000340034430000230037849000550040152006200045650000330107653800360110965000140114565000300115965000310118965000240122065000220124465000290126685601610129597500120145609612020300200358UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612020300200358 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWoman's brain, man's brainh[electronic resource] :bfeminism and anthropology in late nineteenth-century France /cCharles Sowerwine. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 12, Issue 2, 2003 aThis article deals with the tangled web of late nineteenth-century French arguments for the biological inferiority of women and of non-whites. These arguments were largely based on an anthropological paradigm: the brain was materialist in its function and brain size was therefore linked to intelligence. The article demonstrates that these arguments were linked to progressive, anticlerical, masculinist Republican views by analysing the anthropological work of a woman anthropologist, feminist and socialist, Dr Madeleine Pelletier, work in which she struggled to subvert the paradigm in its application to women. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/womans-brain-mans-brain-feminism-and-anthropology-in-late-nineteenth-century-france-1 aJournal02021nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624500990020526000340030430000230033849000550036152009240041650000330134053800360137365000140140965000300142365000310145365000240148465000220150865000290153085601240155997500120168309612020300200376UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612020300200376 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen resisting the voteh[electronic resource] :ba case of anti feminism? /cMartine Faraut. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 12, Issue 4, 2003 aThe resistance of women to the vote is often regarded as a form of anti-feminism, particularly when it has its roots in an attachment to gender roles. However, the arguments of the women of the Radical Right who opposed the franchise at the beginning of the twentieth century not only contributed to the public debate on woman's role in society but also unmistakably evoked some of the teachings of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, which, far from challenging the patriarchal ideology of the separate spheres, celebrated domestic virtues and invited the 'Sex' to regard the private world as its natural preserve. By appropriating a Wollstonecraftian kind of citizenship, based on the belief that woman's natural sphere was the home and maternity her true vocation, the Antis emerge paradoxically in the history of the cause more as the heiresses of the mother of feminism herself than as her fundamental opponents. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/women-resisting-the-vote-a-case-of-anti-feminism aJournal02145nam a2200325Ia 450000100180000000300080001800500170002600600190004300700150006200800410007702400300011804000210014805000170016908200190018624501420020526000340034730000230038149000540040452009630045850000330142153800360145465000140149065000300150465000310153465000240156565000220158965000290161185601670164097500120180709612020000200267UtOrBLW20161016222432.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161016s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d8 a10.1080/09612020000200267 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aye are all one in Christ Jesus'h[electronic resource] :baspects of unitarianism and feminism in Birmingham, c. 1869́90 /cHelen Plant. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource.0 aWomen's History Review ;vVolume 9, Issue 4, 2000 aThe records of women's rights organisations active in Birmingham during the 1870s and 1880s indicate that these societies were dominated by women and men from families connected with the city's leading Unitarian chapel, the Church of the Messiah. In this article, I explore this phenomenon as a way of illuminating the relationship between religious belief and feminist activism. The shared social, economic and political values and progressive outlook of the Unitarian elite underpinned their emergence as a feminist network. This collective reformist consciousness was channelled into concern to improve the position of women by the 'feminist gospel' preached by Henry Crosskey, the minister of the chapel from 1869 to 1893. Furthermore, Crosskey's influential role, along with the substantial presence of other Unitarian men in local women's rights associations, reveals how denominational affiliation could operate to stimulate male support for feminism. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/journal-articles/ye-are-all-one-in-christ-jesus-aspects-of-unitarianism-and-feminism-in-birmingham-c-1869-90 aJournal03118nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450066002152600034002813000023003155000033003385202082003715380036024536500014024896500030025036500031025336500024025646500022025886500029026107000032026398560100026719750009027719780415395373UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153953738 a10.4324/9780415395373 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aAfrican American Feminisms, 1828-1923h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe black women's club movement is frequently seen as definitive of "first-wave" African American feminism. However, this six-volume collection from the History of Feminism series draws together key documents that show the varied political work African American feminists were undertaking well before the turn into the 20th century. African American Feminisms brings together writings that document distinctly African American feminist organizing from as early as the late 1820s through female benevolent and literary societies, as well as writings that document African American feminist participation in black political concerns such as emigration and colonization, discrimination in public transportation, and anti-lynching. African American women also negotiated competing demands within interracial reform movements like abolition, woman's rights, temperance and suffrage, as well as within organizations like the black church, making documents that offer insight into those unique demands key to understanding black feminist arguments and rhetoric. Pursuing a varied feminist rhetoric that ranged from advocating domestic and maternal feminism to defending black womanhood, African American feminists focused on larger social reforms as well as agitating for material changes in the lives of African American women and girls. African American feminists were also keenly attuned to opening useful venues to black feminist voices, from the pulpit to the press, and urged the women that followed them to continue this work. This collection, which includes a variety of genres from the spiritual autobiography to the platform speech and the pamphlet, goes beyond the more common focus on the "greats" of black feminism to include lesser known black feminists and some unidentified women who contributed to black feminist debate on a variety of topics. African American Feminisms, edited and with an introduction by Teresa Zackodnik, is destined to be welcomed by those interested in women's studies, feminism, and African American history as an invaluable reference resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aZackodnik, Teresa,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/african-american-feminisms-1828-1923 aBook03150nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450059002152600034002743000023003085000033003315202082003645380036024466500014024826500030024966500031025266500024025576500022025816500029026037000032026328560139026649750009028039780415395397UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153953978 a10.4324/9780415395397 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aAbolition and Female Societiesh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe black women's club movement is frequently seen as definitive of "first-wave" African American feminism. However, this six-volume collection from the History of Feminism series draws together key documents that show the varied political work African American feminists were undertaking well before the turn into the 20th century. African American Feminisms brings together writings that document distinctly African American feminist organizing from as early as the late 1820s through female benevolent and literary societies, as well as writings that document African American feminist participation in black political concerns such as emigration and colonization, discrimination in public transportation, and anti-lynching. African American women also negotiated competing demands within interracial reform movements like abolition, woman's rights, temperance and suffrage, as well as within organizations like the black church, making documents that offer insight into those unique demands key to understanding black feminist arguments and rhetoric. Pursuing a varied feminist rhetoric that ranged from advocating domestic and maternal feminism to defending black womanhood, African American feminists focused on larger social reforms as well as agitating for material changes in the lives of African American women and girls. African American feminists were also keenly attuned to opening useful venues to black feminist voices, from the pulpit to the press, and urged the women that followed them to continue this work. This collection, which includes a variety of genres from the spiritual autobiography to the platform speech and the pamphlet, goes beyond the more common focus on the "greats" of black feminism to include lesser known black feminists and some unidentified women who contributed to black feminist debate on a variety of topics. African American Feminisms, edited and with an introduction by Teresa Zackodnik, is destined to be welcomed by those interested in women's studies, feminism, and African American history as an invaluable reference resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aZackodnik, Teresa,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/african-american-feminisms-1828-1923/volumes/abolition-and-female-societies aBook03140nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450054002152600034002693000023003035000033003265202082003595380036024416500014024776500030024916500031025216500024025526500022025766500029025987000032026278560134026599750009027939780415395427UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153954278 a10.4324/9780415395427 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aBlack Feminist Organizingh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe black women's club movement is frequently seen as definitive of "first-wave" African American feminism. However, this six-volume collection from the History of Feminism series draws together key documents that show the varied political work African American feminists were undertaking well before the turn into the 20th century. African American Feminisms brings together writings that document distinctly African American feminist organizing from as early as the late 1820s through female benevolent and literary societies, as well as writings that document African American feminist participation in black political concerns such as emigration and colonization, discrimination in public transportation, and anti-lynching. African American women also negotiated competing demands within interracial reform movements like abolition, woman's rights, temperance and suffrage, as well as within organizations like the black church, making documents that offer insight into those unique demands key to understanding black feminist arguments and rhetoric. Pursuing a varied feminist rhetoric that ranged from advocating domestic and maternal feminism to defending black womanhood, African American feminists focused on larger social reforms as well as agitating for material changes in the lives of African American women and girls. African American feminists were also keenly attuned to opening useful venues to black feminist voices, from the pulpit to the press, and urged the women that followed them to continue this work. This collection, which includes a variety of genres from the spiritual autobiography to the platform speech and the pamphlet, goes beyond the more common focus on the "greats" of black feminism to include lesser known black feminists and some unidentified women who contributed to black feminist debate on a variety of topics. African American Feminisms, edited and with an introduction by Teresa Zackodnik, is destined to be welcomed by those interested in women's studies, feminism, and African American history as an invaluable reference resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aZackodnik, Teresa,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/african-american-feminisms-1828-1923/volumes/black-feminist-organizing aBook03142nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450055002152600034002703000023003045000033003275202082003605380036024426500014024786500030024926500031025226500024025536500022025776500029025997000032026288560135026609750009027959780415395403UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153954038 a10.4324/9780415395403 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFeminist Black Nationalismh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe black women's club movement is frequently seen as definitive of "first-wave" African American feminism. However, this six-volume collection from the History of Feminism series draws together key documents that show the varied political work African American feminists were undertaking well before the turn into the 20th century. African American Feminisms brings together writings that document distinctly African American feminist organizing from as early as the late 1820s through female benevolent and literary societies, as well as writings that document African American feminist participation in black political concerns such as emigration and colonization, discrimination in public transportation, and anti-lynching. African American women also negotiated competing demands within interracial reform movements like abolition, woman's rights, temperance and suffrage, as well as within organizations like the black church, making documents that offer insight into those unique demands key to understanding black feminist arguments and rhetoric. Pursuing a varied feminist rhetoric that ranged from advocating domestic and maternal feminism to defending black womanhood, African American feminists focused on larger social reforms as well as agitating for material changes in the lives of African American women and girls. African American feminists were also keenly attuned to opening useful venues to black feminist voices, from the pulpit to the press, and urged the women that followed them to continue this work. This collection, which includes a variety of genres from the spiritual autobiography to the platform speech and the pamphlet, goes beyond the more common focus on the "greats" of black feminism to include lesser known black feminists and some unidentified women who contributed to black feminist debate on a variety of topics. African American Feminisms, edited and with an introduction by Teresa Zackodnik, is destined to be welcomed by those interested in women's studies, feminism, and African American history as an invaluable reference resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aZackodnik, Teresa,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/african-american-feminisms-1828-1923/volumes/feminist-black-nationalism aBook03172nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450070002152600034002853000023003195000033003425202082003755380036024576500014024936500030025076500031025376500024025686500022025926500029026147000032026438560150026759750009028259780415395434UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153954348 a10.4324/9780415395434 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aInterracial and Black Feminist Organizingh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe black women's club movement is frequently seen as definitive of "first-wave" African American feminism. However, this six-volume collection from the History of Feminism series draws together key documents that show the varied political work African American feminists were undertaking well before the turn into the 20th century. African American Feminisms brings together writings that document distinctly African American feminist organizing from as early as the late 1820s through female benevolent and literary societies, as well as writings that document African American feminist participation in black political concerns such as emigration and colonization, discrimination in public transportation, and anti-lynching. African American women also negotiated competing demands within interracial reform movements like abolition, woman's rights, temperance and suffrage, as well as within organizations like the black church, making documents that offer insight into those unique demands key to understanding black feminist arguments and rhetoric. Pursuing a varied feminist rhetoric that ranged from advocating domestic and maternal feminism to defending black womanhood, African American feminists focused on larger social reforms as well as agitating for material changes in the lives of African American women and girls. African American feminists were also keenly attuned to opening useful venues to black feminist voices, from the pulpit to the press, and urged the women that followed them to continue this work. This collection, which includes a variety of genres from the spiritual autobiography to the platform speech and the pamphlet, goes beyond the more common focus on the "greats" of black feminism to include lesser known black feminists and some unidentified women who contributed to black feminist debate on a variety of topics. African American Feminisms, edited and with an introduction by Teresa Zackodnik, is destined to be welcomed by those interested in women's studies, feminism, and African American history as an invaluable reference resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aZackodnik, Teresa,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/african-american-feminisms-1828-1923/volumes/interracial-and-black-feminist-organizing aBook03186nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450078002152600034002933000023003275000033003505202082003835380036024656500014025016500030025156500031025456500024025766500022026006500029026227000032026518560156026839750009028399780415395410UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153954108 a10.4324/9780415395410 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aJim Crow, Lynching, and African American Feminismh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe black women's club movement is frequently seen as definitive of "first-wave" African American feminism. However, this six-volume collection from the History of Feminism series draws together key documents that show the varied political work African American feminists were undertaking well before the turn into the 20th century. African American Feminisms brings together writings that document distinctly African American feminist organizing from as early as the late 1820s through female benevolent and literary societies, as well as writings that document African American feminist participation in black political concerns such as emigration and colonization, discrimination in public transportation, and anti-lynching. African American women also negotiated competing demands within interracial reform movements like abolition, woman's rights, temperance and suffrage, as well as within organizations like the black church, making documents that offer insight into those unique demands key to understanding black feminist arguments and rhetoric. Pursuing a varied feminist rhetoric that ranged from advocating domestic and maternal feminism to defending black womanhood, African American feminists focused on larger social reforms as well as agitating for material changes in the lives of African American women and girls. African American feminists were also keenly attuned to opening useful venues to black feminist voices, from the pulpit to the press, and urged the women that followed them to continue this work. This collection, which includes a variety of genres from the spiritual autobiography to the platform speech and the pamphlet, goes beyond the more common focus on the "greats" of black feminism to include lesser known black feminists and some unidentified women who contributed to black feminist debate on a variety of topics. African American Feminisms, edited and with an introduction by Teresa Zackodnik, is destined to be welcomed by those interested in women's studies, feminism, and African American history as an invaluable reference resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aZackodnik, Teresa,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/african-american-feminisms-1828-1923/volumes/jim-crow-lynching-and-african-american-feminism aBook03130nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450049002152600034002643000023002985000033003215202082003545380036024366500014024726500030024866500031025166500024025476500022025716500029025937000032026228560129026549750009027839780415395380UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153953808 a10.4324/9780415395380 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen and the Churchh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe black women's club movement is frequently seen as definitive of "first-wave" African American feminism. However, this six-volume collection from the History of Feminism series draws together key documents that show the varied political work African American feminists were undertaking well before the turn into the 20th century. African American Feminisms brings together writings that document distinctly African American feminist organizing from as early as the late 1820s through female benevolent and literary societies, as well as writings that document African American feminist participation in black political concerns such as emigration and colonization, discrimination in public transportation, and anti-lynching. African American women also negotiated competing demands within interracial reform movements like abolition, woman's rights, temperance and suffrage, as well as within organizations like the black church, making documents that offer insight into those unique demands key to understanding black feminist arguments and rhetoric. Pursuing a varied feminist rhetoric that ranged from advocating domestic and maternal feminism to defending black womanhood, African American feminists focused on larger social reforms as well as agitating for material changes in the lives of African American women and girls. African American feminists were also keenly attuned to opening useful venues to black feminist voices, from the pulpit to the press, and urged the women that followed them to continue this work. This collection, which includes a variety of genres from the spiritual autobiography to the platform speech and the pamphlet, goes beyond the more common focus on the "greats" of black feminism to include lesser known black feminists and some unidentified women who contributed to black feminist debate on a variety of topics. African American Feminisms, edited and with an introduction by Teresa Zackodnik, is destined to be welcomed by those interested in women's studies, feminism, and African American history as an invaluable reference resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aZackodnik, Teresa,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/african-american-feminisms-1828-1923/volumes/women-and-the-church aBook01825nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450082002152600034002973000023003315000033003545200711003875380036010986500014011346500030011486500031011786500024012096500022012336500029012557000026012847000031013107000032013418560081013739750009014549780415219457UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804152194578 a10.4324/9780415219457 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aAmerican Feminismh[electronic resource] :bKey Source Documents 1848 - 1920. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis anthology publishes key documents in the history of American feminism that are currently only available in extract form or in archives. This set spans from the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 to the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment granting women's suffrage in 1920, and includes works of well-known women's campaigners such as: Angelina and Sarah M. Grimke, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucy Stone, Susan B. Anthony, Sojourner Truth, Victoria Woodhull, Margaret Fuller, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Carrie Chapman Catt, Jane Addams, Matilda Gage and others. The collection also contains anti-feminist writings, by both men and women, including socio-medical writings and examples from health manuals. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aBeer, Janet,eeditor.1 aFord, Anne-Marie,eeditor.1 aJoslin, Katherine,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/american-feminism aBook01775nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450067002152600034002823000023003165000033003395200711003725380036010836500014011196500030011336500031011636500024011946500022012186500029012407000032012698560127013019750009014289780415219488UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804152194888 a10.4324/9780415219488 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aHealth, Birth Control and Prostitutionh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis anthology publishes key documents in the history of American feminism that are currently only available in extract form or in archives. This set spans from the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 to the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment granting women's suffrage in 1920, and includes works of well-known women's campaigners such as: Angelina and Sarah M. Grimke, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucy Stone, Susan B. Anthony, Sojourner Truth, Victoria Woodhull, Margaret Fuller, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Carrie Chapman Catt, Jane Addams, Matilda Gage and others. The collection also contains anti-feminist writings, by both men and women, including socio-medical writings and examples from health manuals. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aJoslin, Katherine,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/american-feminism/volumes/health-birth-control-and-prostitution aBook01710nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450037002152600034002523000023002865000033003095200711003425380036010536500014010896500030011036500031011336500024011646500022011886500029012107000026012398560098012659750009013639780415219464UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804152194648 a10.4324/9780415219464 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSuffrageh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis anthology publishes key documents in the history of American feminism that are currently only available in extract form or in archives. This set spans from the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 to the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment granting women's suffrage in 1920, and includes works of well-known women's campaigners such as: Angelina and Sarah M. Grimke, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucy Stone, Susan B. Anthony, Sojourner Truth, Victoria Woodhull, Margaret Fuller, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Carrie Chapman Catt, Jane Addams, Matilda Gage and others. The collection also contains anti-feminist writings, by both men and women, including socio-medical writings and examples from health manuals. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aBeer, Janet,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/american-feminism/volumes/suffrage aBook01757nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450058002152600034002733000023003075000033003305200711003635380036010746500014011106500030011246500031011546500024011856500022012096500029012317000032012608560118012929750009014109780415219495UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804152194958 a10.4324/9780415219495 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen's Clubs and Settlementsh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis anthology publishes key documents in the history of American feminism that are currently only available in extract form or in archives. This set spans from the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 to the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment granting women's suffrage in 1920, and includes works of well-known women's campaigners such as: Angelina and Sarah M. Grimke, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucy Stone, Susan B. Anthony, Sojourner Truth, Victoria Woodhull, Margaret Fuller, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Carrie Chapman Catt, Jane Addams, Matilda Gage and others. The collection also contains anti-feminist writings, by both men and women, including socio-medical writings and examples from health manuals. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aJoslin, Katherine,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/american-feminism/volumes/womens-clubs-and-settlements aBook01735nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450047002152600034002623000023002965000033003195200711003525380036010636500014010996500030011136500031011436500024011746500022011986500029012207000031012498560108012809750009013889780415219471UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804152194718 a10.4324/9780415219471 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWork and Educationh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis anthology publishes key documents in the history of American feminism that are currently only available in extract form or in archives. This set spans from the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 to the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment granting women's suffrage in 1920, and includes works of well-known women's campaigners such as: Angelina and Sarah M. Grimke, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucy Stone, Susan B. Anthony, Sojourner Truth, Victoria Woodhull, Margaret Fuller, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Carrie Chapman Catt, Jane Addams, Matilda Gage and others. The collection also contains anti-feminist writings, by both men and women, including socio-medical writings and examples from health manuals. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aFord, Anne-Marie,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/american-feminism/volumes/work-and-education aBook01327nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450110002152600034003253000023003595000033003825200244004155380036006596500014006956500030007096500031007396500024007706500022007946500029008167000030008458560105008759750009009809780203075654UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97802030756548 a10.4324/9780203075654 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aAnimal Welfare & Anti-Vivisection 1870-1910h[electronic resource] :bNineteenth-Century Woman's Mission. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis set brings together a range of documents that will allow researchers to explore the nineteenth- century vivisection controversy, its relation to the prominent animal welfare movement and the specific role of women within the movement. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHamilton, Susan,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/animal-welfare-anti-vivisection-1870-1910 aBook01306nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450055002152600034002703000023003045000033003275200244003605380036006046500014006406500030006546500031006846500024007156500022007396500029007617000030007908560139008209750009009599780415321433UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153214338 a10.4324/9780415321433 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aAnti- Vivisection Writingsh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis set brings together a range of documents that will allow researchers to explore the nineteenth- century vivisection controversy, its relation to the prominent animal welfare movement and the specific role of women within the movement. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHamilton, Susan,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/animal-welfare-anti-vivisection-1870-1910/volumes/anti-vivisection-writings aBook01293nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450048002152600034002633000023002975000033003205200244003535380036005976500014006336500030006476500031006776500024007086500022007326500029007547000030007838560133008139750009009469780415321426UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153214268 a10.4324/9780415321426 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFrances Power Cobbeh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis set brings together a range of documents that will allow researchers to explore the nineteenth- century vivisection controversy, its relation to the prominent animal welfare movement and the specific role of women within the movement. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHamilton, Susan,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/animal-welfare-anti-vivisection-1870-1910/volumes/frances-power-cobbe aBook01303nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450053002152600034002683000023003025000033003255200244003585380036006026500014006386500030006526500031006826500024007136500022007376500029007597000030007888560138008189750009009569780415321440UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153214408 a10.4324/9780415321440 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPro-Vivisection Writingsh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis set brings together a range of documents that will allow researchers to explore the nineteenth- century vivisection controversy, its relation to the prominent animal welfare movement and the specific role of women within the movement. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHamilton, Susan,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/animal-welfare-anti-vivisection-1870-1910/volumes/pro-vivisection-writings aBook01713nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450100002152600034003153000023003495000033003725200664004055380036010696500014011056500030011196500031011496500024011806500022012046500029012267000026012558560085012819750009013669781851965144UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97818519651448 a10.4324/9781851965144 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aBluestocking Feminismh[electronic resource] :bWritings of the Bluestocking Circle, 1738-1785. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aEighteenth-century Bluestocking women were, on the whole, an upper-class and politically and socially conservative group. For this reason, their writings have been largely neglected in feminist and literary history. In recent decades, however, feminist scholarship and criticism has retrieved the Bluestocking women from their marginal position in eighteenth-century literature. This work collects the principal writings of these women, together with a selection of their letters. Each volume is annotated and all texts are edited and reset. The collection will be of interest to students of eighteenth century history, literature, culture and gender studies. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aKelly, Gary,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/bluestocking-feminism aBook01677nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450040002152600034002553000023002895000033003125200664003455380036010096500014010456500030010596500031010896500024011206500022011446500029011667000030011958560105012259750009013309781138750531UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387505318 a10.4324/9781138750531 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aAnna Sewardh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aEighteenth-century Bluestocking women were, on the whole, an upper-class and politically and socially conservative group. For this reason, their writings have been largely neglected in feminist and literary history. In recent decades, however, feminist scholarship and criticism has retrieved the Bluestocking women from their marginal position in eighteenth-century literature. This work collects the principal writings of these women, together with a selection of their letters. Each volume is annotated and all texts are edited and reset. The collection will be of interest to students of eighteenth century history, literature, culture and gender studies. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aKelly, Jennifer,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/bluestocking-feminism/volumes/anna-seward aBook01714nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450062002152600034002773000023003115000033003345200664003675380036010316500014010676500030010816500031011116500024011426500022011666500029011887000025012178560125012429750009013679781138750524UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387505248 a10.4324/9781138750524 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aCatherine Talbot & Hester Chaponeh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aEighteenth-century Bluestocking women were, on the whole, an upper-class and politically and socially conservative group. For this reason, their writings have been largely neglected in feminist and literary history. In recent decades, however, feminist scholarship and criticism has retrieved the Bluestocking women from their marginal position in eighteenth-century literature. This work collects the principal writings of these women, together with a selection of their letters. Each volume is annotated and all texts are edited and reset. The collection will be of interest to students of eighteenth century history, literature, culture and gender studies. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aZuk, Rhoda,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/bluestocking-feminism/volumes/catherine-talbot-hester-chapone aBook01686nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450045002152600034002603000023002945000033003175200664003505380036010146500014010506500030010646500031010946500024011256500022011496500029011717000029012008560110012299750009013399781138750517UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387505178 a10.4324/9781138750517 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aElizabeth Carterh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aEighteenth-century Bluestocking women were, on the whole, an upper-class and politically and socially conservative group. For this reason, their writings have been largely neglected in feminist and literary history. In recent decades, however, feminist scholarship and criticism has retrieved the Bluestocking women from their marginal position in eighteenth-century literature. This work collects the principal writings of these women, together with a selection of their letters. Each volume is annotated and all texts are edited and reset. The collection will be of interest to students of eighteenth century history, literature, culture and gender studies. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHawley, Judith,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/bluestocking-feminism/volumes/elizabeth-carter aBook01689nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450046002152600034002613000023002955000033003185200664003515380036010156500014010516500030010656500031010956500024011266500022011506500029011727000030012018560111012319750009013429781138750500UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387505008 a10.4324/9781138750500 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aElizabeth Montaguh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aEighteenth-century Bluestocking women were, on the whole, an upper-class and politically and socially conservative group. For this reason, their writings have been largely neglected in feminist and literary history. In recent decades, however, feminist scholarship and criticism has retrieved the Bluestocking women from their marginal position in eighteenth-century literature. This work collects the principal writings of these women, together with a selection of their letters. Each volume is annotated and all texts are edited and reset. The collection will be of interest to students of eighteenth century history, literature, culture and gender studies. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aEger, Elizabeth,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/bluestocking-feminism/volumes/elizabeth-montagu aBook01673nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450040002152600034002553000023002895000033003125200664003455380036010096500014010456500030010596500031010896500024011206500022011446500029011667000026011958560105012219750009013269781138750548UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387505488 a10.4324/9781138750548 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSarah Scotth[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aEighteenth-century Bluestocking women were, on the whole, an upper-class and politically and socially conservative group. For this reason, their writings have been largely neglected in feminist and literary history. In recent decades, however, feminist scholarship and criticism has retrieved the Bluestocking women from their marginal position in eighteenth-century literature. This work collects the principal writings of these women, together with a selection of their letters. Each volume is annotated and all texts are edited and reset. The collection will be of interest to students of eighteenth century history, literature, culture and gender studies. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aKelly, Gary,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/bluestocking-feminism/volumes/sarah-scott aBook01699nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450054002152600034002693000023003035000033003265200664003595380036010236500014010596500030010736500031011036500024011346500022011586500029011807000026012098560117012359750009013529781138750555UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387505558 a10.4324/9781138750555 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSarah Scott & Clara Reeveh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aEighteenth-century Bluestocking women were, on the whole, an upper-class and politically and socially conservative group. For this reason, their writings have been largely neglected in feminist and literary history. In recent decades, however, feminist scholarship and criticism has retrieved the Bluestocking women from their marginal position in eighteenth-century literature. This work collects the principal writings of these women, together with a selection of their letters. Each volume is annotated and all texts are edited and reset. The collection will be of interest to students of eighteenth century history, literature, culture and gender studies. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aKelly, Gary,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/bluestocking-feminism/volumes/sarah-scott-clara-reeve aBook02202nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450077002152600034002923000023003265000033003495201151003825380036015336500014015696500030015836500031016136500024016446500022016686500029016907000026017198560110017459750009018559781851968022UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97818519680228 a10.4324/9781851968022 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aConduct Literature for Women, Part IV, 1770-1830h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis collection aims to give a chronological insight into the evolution of conduct literature, from its early roots in the Renaissance period through to the dramatically different role that women played at the emergence of the 20th century. The material presented in this six-volume set moves away from courtly etiquette, adopting a more middle-class, domestic focus, and includes facsimile reproductions of sermons, poems, narratives and cookery books. Social and literary historians recognise the 1790s as a moment of political crisis and turbulence in British history: the intense reactions in Britain to increasing revolutionary violence in France politicised almost every aspect of cultural life. At the centre of discursive hostilities was the opposition between sentimentality, on the one hand, and rationality, on the other. Two of the most important literary forms utilised for expressing these polemics were novels and treatises on education, as well as conduct writing. Conduct Literature for Women IV, 1770-1830 makes available this body of writing, which has been less well studied in respect to the war of ideas than the former two. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMorris, Pam,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/conduct-literature-for-women-part-iv-1770-1830 aBook02241nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450069002152600034002843000023003185000033003415201151003745380036015256500014015616500030015756500031016056500024016366500022016606500029016827000026017118560157017379750009018949781138752207UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387522078 a10.4324/9781138752207 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aConduct Literature for Women 1770 - 1830h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis collection aims to give a chronological insight into the evolution of conduct literature, from its early roots in the Renaissance period through to the dramatically different role that women played at the emergence of the 20th century. The material presented in this six-volume set moves away from courtly etiquette, adopting a more middle-class, domestic focus, and includes facsimile reproductions of sermons, poems, narratives and cookery books. Social and literary historians recognise the 1790s as a moment of political crisis and turbulence in British history: the intense reactions in Britain to increasing revolutionary violence in France politicised almost every aspect of cultural life. At the centre of discursive hostilities was the opposition between sentimentality, on the one hand, and rationality, on the other. Two of the most important literary forms utilised for expressing these polemics were novels and treatises on education, as well as conduct writing. Conduct Literature for Women IV, 1770-1830 makes available this body of writing, which has been less well studied in respect to the war of ideas than the former two. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMorris, Pam,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/conduct-literature-for-women-part-iv-1770-1830/volumes/conduct-literature-for-women-1770-1830 aBook02243nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450069002152600034002843000023003185000033003415201151003745380036015256500014015616500030015756500031016056500024016366500022016606500029016827000026017118560159017379750009018969781138752214UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387522148 a10.4324/9781138752214 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aConduct Literature for Women 1770 - 1830h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis collection aims to give a chronological insight into the evolution of conduct literature, from its early roots in the Renaissance period through to the dramatically different role that women played at the emergence of the 20th century. The material presented in this six-volume set moves away from courtly etiquette, adopting a more middle-class, domestic focus, and includes facsimile reproductions of sermons, poems, narratives and cookery books. Social and literary historians recognise the 1790s as a moment of political crisis and turbulence in British history: the intense reactions in Britain to increasing revolutionary violence in France politicised almost every aspect of cultural life. At the centre of discursive hostilities was the opposition between sentimentality, on the one hand, and rationality, on the other. Two of the most important literary forms utilised for expressing these polemics were novels and treatises on education, as well as conduct writing. Conduct Literature for Women IV, 1770-1830 makes available this body of writing, which has been less well studied in respect to the war of ideas than the former two. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMorris, Pam,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/conduct-literature-for-women-part-iv-1770-1830/volumes/conduct-literature-for-women-1770-1830-1 aBook02243nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450069002152600034002843000023003185000033003415201151003745380036015256500014015616500030015756500031016056500024016366500022016606500029016827000026017118560159017379750009018969781138752221UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387522218 a10.4324/9781138752221 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aConduct Literature for Women 1770 - 1830h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis collection aims to give a chronological insight into the evolution of conduct literature, from its early roots in the Renaissance period through to the dramatically different role that women played at the emergence of the 20th century. The material presented in this six-volume set moves away from courtly etiquette, adopting a more middle-class, domestic focus, and includes facsimile reproductions of sermons, poems, narratives and cookery books. Social and literary historians recognise the 1790s as a moment of political crisis and turbulence in British history: the intense reactions in Britain to increasing revolutionary violence in France politicised almost every aspect of cultural life. At the centre of discursive hostilities was the opposition between sentimentality, on the one hand, and rationality, on the other. Two of the most important literary forms utilised for expressing these polemics were novels and treatises on education, as well as conduct writing. Conduct Literature for Women IV, 1770-1830 makes available this body of writing, which has been less well studied in respect to the war of ideas than the former two. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMorris, Pam,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/conduct-literature-for-women-part-iv-1770-1830/volumes/conduct-literature-for-women-1770-1830-2 aBook02243nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450069002152600034002843000023003185000033003415201151003745380036015256500014015616500030015756500031016056500024016366500022016606500029016827000026017118560159017379750009018969781138752238UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387522388 a10.4324/9781138752238 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aConduct Literature for Women 1770 - 1830h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis collection aims to give a chronological insight into the evolution of conduct literature, from its early roots in the Renaissance period through to the dramatically different role that women played at the emergence of the 20th century. The material presented in this six-volume set moves away from courtly etiquette, adopting a more middle-class, domestic focus, and includes facsimile reproductions of sermons, poems, narratives and cookery books. Social and literary historians recognise the 1790s as a moment of political crisis and turbulence in British history: the intense reactions in Britain to increasing revolutionary violence in France politicised almost every aspect of cultural life. At the centre of discursive hostilities was the opposition between sentimentality, on the one hand, and rationality, on the other. Two of the most important literary forms utilised for expressing these polemics were novels and treatises on education, as well as conduct writing. Conduct Literature for Women IV, 1770-1830 makes available this body of writing, which has been less well studied in respect to the war of ideas than the former two. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMorris, Pam,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/conduct-literature-for-women-part-iv-1770-1830/volumes/conduct-literature-for-women-1770-1830-3 aBook02243nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450069002152600034002843000023003185000033003415201151003745380036015256500014015616500030015756500031016056500024016366500022016606500029016827000026017118560159017379750009018969781138752245UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387522458 a10.4324/9781138752245 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aConduct Literature for Women 1770 - 1830h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis collection aims to give a chronological insight into the evolution of conduct literature, from its early roots in the Renaissance period through to the dramatically different role that women played at the emergence of the 20th century. The material presented in this six-volume set moves away from courtly etiquette, adopting a more middle-class, domestic focus, and includes facsimile reproductions of sermons, poems, narratives and cookery books. Social and literary historians recognise the 1790s as a moment of political crisis and turbulence in British history: the intense reactions in Britain to increasing revolutionary violence in France politicised almost every aspect of cultural life. At the centre of discursive hostilities was the opposition between sentimentality, on the one hand, and rationality, on the other. Two of the most important literary forms utilised for expressing these polemics were novels and treatises on education, as well as conduct writing. Conduct Literature for Women IV, 1770-1830 makes available this body of writing, which has been less well studied in respect to the war of ideas than the former two. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMorris, Pam,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/conduct-literature-for-women-part-iv-1770-1830/volumes/conduct-literature-for-women-1770-1830-4 aBook02243nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450069002152600034002843000023003185000033003415201151003745380036015256500014015616500030015756500031016056500024016366500022016606500029016827000026017118560159017379750009018969781138752252UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387522528 a10.4324/9781138752252 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aConduct Literature for Women 1770 - 1830h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis collection aims to give a chronological insight into the evolution of conduct literature, from its early roots in the Renaissance period through to the dramatically different role that women played at the emergence of the 20th century. The material presented in this six-volume set moves away from courtly etiquette, adopting a more middle-class, domestic focus, and includes facsimile reproductions of sermons, poems, narratives and cookery books. Social and literary historians recognise the 1790s as a moment of political crisis and turbulence in British history: the intense reactions in Britain to increasing revolutionary violence in France politicised almost every aspect of cultural life. At the centre of discursive hostilities was the opposition between sentimentality, on the one hand, and rationality, on the other. Two of the most important literary forms utilised for expressing these polemics were novels and treatises on education, as well as conduct writing. Conduct Literature for Women IV, 1770-1830 makes available this body of writing, which has been less well studied in respect to the war of ideas than the former two. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMorris, Pam,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/conduct-literature-for-women-part-iv-1770-1830/volumes/conduct-literature-for-women-1770-1830-5 aBook02797nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450071002152600034002863000023003205000033003435201756003765380036021326500014021686500030021826500031022126500024022436500022022676500029022897000029023188560103023479750009024509780415559492UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804155594928 a10.4324/9780415559492 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFemale Journalists of the Fin de Si©·cleh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aEspecially in recent years, late nineteenth-century novels, short stories, and essays have attracted considerable scholarly interest. Research into texts by and about the New Woman has played a major role in shaping a critical understanding of fin-de-si©·cle literature, New Journalism, gender politics, activism, work, and education. Serious academic work has, in particular, focused on changing gender roles and women's participation in the public sphere and urban spaces. This new title in the History of Feminism series, co-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, is a four-volume collection of primary materials which builds on this existing scholarship. It brings together a wide range of fiction and non-fiction texts first published between the 1800s and the early twentieth century to present different aspects of what it meant to be a female journalist at the turn of the nineteenth century. Making readily available such materialśwhich are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and usé Female Journalists of the Fin de Si©·cle is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. The collection is also supplemented by a detailed and comprehensive introduction, newly written by the editor, which contextualizes the material in terms of fin-de-si©·cle publishing, journalism, and authorship. And with a detailed appendix providing data on the magazines, newspapers, and periodicals in which the articles and stories of the period were originally published, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aShelley, Lorna,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/female-journalists-of-the-fin-de-siecle aBook02782nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450038002152600034002533000023002875000033003105201756003435380036020996500014021356500030021496500031021796500024022106500022022346500029022567000029022858560121023149750009024359780415559515UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804155595158 a10.4324/9780415559515 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFiction 1h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aEspecially in recent years, late nineteenth-century novels, short stories, and essays have attracted considerable scholarly interest. Research into texts by and about the New Woman has played a major role in shaping a critical understanding of fin-de-si©·cle literature, New Journalism, gender politics, activism, work, and education. Serious academic work has, in particular, focused on changing gender roles and women's participation in the public sphere and urban spaces. This new title in the History of Feminism series, co-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, is a four-volume collection of primary materials which builds on this existing scholarship. It brings together a wide range of fiction and non-fiction texts first published between the 1800s and the early twentieth century to present different aspects of what it meant to be a female journalist at the turn of the nineteenth century. Making readily available such materialśwhich are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and usé Female Journalists of the Fin de Si©·cle is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. The collection is also supplemented by a detailed and comprehensive introduction, newly written by the editor, which contextualizes the material in terms of fin-de-si©·cle publishing, journalism, and authorship. And with a detailed appendix providing data on the magazines, newspapers, and periodicals in which the articles and stories of the period were originally published, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aShelley, Lorna,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/female-journalists-of-the-fin-de-siecle/volumes/fiction-1 aBook02782nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450038002152600034002533000023002875000033003105201756003435380036020996500014021356500030021496500031021796500024022106500022022346500029022567000029022858560121023149750009024359780415559522UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804155595228 a10.4324/9780415559522 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFiction 2h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aEspecially in recent years, late nineteenth-century novels, short stories, and essays have attracted considerable scholarly interest. Research into texts by and about the New Woman has played a major role in shaping a critical understanding of fin-de-si©·cle literature, New Journalism, gender politics, activism, work, and education. Serious academic work has, in particular, focused on changing gender roles and women's participation in the public sphere and urban spaces. This new title in the History of Feminism series, co-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, is a four-volume collection of primary materials which builds on this existing scholarship. It brings together a wide range of fiction and non-fiction texts first published between the 1800s and the early twentieth century to present different aspects of what it meant to be a female journalist at the turn of the nineteenth century. Making readily available such materialśwhich are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and usé Female Journalists of the Fin de Si©·cle is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. The collection is also supplemented by a detailed and comprehensive introduction, newly written by the editor, which contextualizes the material in terms of fin-de-si©·cle publishing, journalism, and authorship. And with a detailed appendix providing data on the magazines, newspapers, and periodicals in which the articles and stories of the period were originally published, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aShelley, Lorna,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/female-journalists-of-the-fin-de-siecle/volumes/fiction-2 aBook02830nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450062002152600034002773000023003115000033003345201756003675380036021236500014021596500030021736500031022036500024022346500022022586500029022807000029023098560145023389750009024839780415559539UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804155595398 a10.4324/9780415559539 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPress Work in Fiction and in Facth[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aEspecially in recent years, late nineteenth-century novels, short stories, and essays have attracted considerable scholarly interest. Research into texts by and about the New Woman has played a major role in shaping a critical understanding of fin-de-si©·cle literature, New Journalism, gender politics, activism, work, and education. Serious academic work has, in particular, focused on changing gender roles and women's participation in the public sphere and urban spaces. This new title in the History of Feminism series, co-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, is a four-volume collection of primary materials which builds on this existing scholarship. It brings together a wide range of fiction and non-fiction texts first published between the 1800s and the early twentieth century to present different aspects of what it meant to be a female journalist at the turn of the nineteenth century. Making readily available such materialśwhich are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and usé Female Journalists of the Fin de Si©·cle is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. The collection is also supplemented by a detailed and comprehensive introduction, newly written by the editor, which contextualizes the material in terms of fin-de-si©·cle publishing, journalism, and authorship. And with a detailed appendix providing data on the magazines, newspapers, and periodicals in which the articles and stories of the period were originally published, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aShelley, Lorna,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/female-journalists-of-the-fin-de-siecle/volumes/press-work-in-fiction-and-in-fact aBook02912nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450103002152600034003183000023003525000033003755201756004085380036021646500014022006500030022146500031022446500024022756500022022996500029023217000029023508560186023799750009025659780415559508UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804155595088 a10.4324/9780415559508 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Advanced Woman in Journalism and the Case Against the Woman Journalisth[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aEspecially in recent years, late nineteenth-century novels, short stories, and essays have attracted considerable scholarly interest. Research into texts by and about the New Woman has played a major role in shaping a critical understanding of fin-de-si©·cle literature, New Journalism, gender politics, activism, work, and education. Serious academic work has, in particular, focused on changing gender roles and women's participation in the public sphere and urban spaces. This new title in the History of Feminism series, co-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, is a four-volume collection of primary materials which builds on this existing scholarship. It brings together a wide range of fiction and non-fiction texts first published between the 1800s and the early twentieth century to present different aspects of what it meant to be a female journalist at the turn of the nineteenth century. Making readily available such materialśwhich are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and usé Female Journalists of the Fin de Si©·cle is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. The collection is also supplemented by a detailed and comprehensive introduction, newly written by the editor, which contextualizes the material in terms of fin-de-si©·cle publishing, journalism, and authorship. And with a detailed appendix providing data on the magazines, newspapers, and periodicals in which the articles and stories of the period were originally published, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aShelley, Lorna,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/female-journalists-of-the-fin-de-siecle/volumes/the-advanced-woman-in-journalism-and-the-case-against-the-woman-journalist aBook02003nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450075002152600034002903000023003245000033003475200877003805380036012576500014012936500030013076500031013376500024013686500022013926500029014147000026014437000029014697000026014988560108015249750009016329780415320269UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153202698 a10.4324/9780415320269 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFeminism and the Periodical Press, 1900 - 1918h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe Edwardian period experienced a particularly vibrant periodical culture, with phenomenal growth in the numbers of titles published that were either aimed specifically at women, or else saw women as a key section of their readership or contributor group. It was an era of political ferment in which a number of 'progressive' traditions were formulated, shaped or abandoned, including socialism, feminism, modernism, empire politics, trade unionism and welfarism. Organized around some of the central themes of political thought and utopian thinking, this impressive collection gathers together classic articles from key periodicals. The set presents a comprehensive sourcebook of readings on Edwardian/Progressive era feminist thought, exploring the intervention of the radical public intellectuals working in these traditions in North America and the UK from 1900-1918. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aDelap, Lucy,eeditor.1 aDiCenzo, Maria,eeditor.1 aRyan, Leila,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/feminism-and-the-periodicals-press-1900-1918 aBook02055nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450075002152600034002903000023003245000033003475200877003805380036012576500014012936500030013076500031013376500024013686500022013926500029014147000026014437000029014697000026014988560160015249750009016849780415320276UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153202768 a10.4324/9780415320276 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFeminism and the Periodical Press, 1900 - 1918h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe Edwardian period experienced a particularly vibrant periodical culture, with phenomenal growth in the numbers of titles published that were either aimed specifically at women, or else saw women as a key section of their readership or contributor group. It was an era of political ferment in which a number of 'progressive' traditions were formulated, shaped or abandoned, including socialism, feminism, modernism, empire politics, trade unionism and welfarism. Organized around some of the central themes of political thought and utopian thinking, this impressive collection gathers together classic articles from key periodicals. The set presents a comprehensive sourcebook of readings on Edwardian/Progressive era feminist thought, exploring the intervention of the radical public intellectuals working in these traditions in North America and the UK from 1900-1918. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aDelap, Lucy,eeditor.1 aDiCenzo, Maria,eeditor.1 aRyan, Leila,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/feminism-and-the-periodicals-press-1900-1918/volumes/feminism-and-the-periodical-press-1900-1918 aBook02057nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450075002152600034002903000023003245000033003475200877003805380036012576500014012936500030013076500031013376500024013686500022013926500029014147000026014437000029014697000026014988560162015249750009016869780415320283UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153202838 a10.4324/9780415320283 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFeminism and the Periodical Press, 1900 - 1918h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe Edwardian period experienced a particularly vibrant periodical culture, with phenomenal growth in the numbers of titles published that were either aimed specifically at women, or else saw women as a key section of their readership or contributor group. It was an era of political ferment in which a number of 'progressive' traditions were formulated, shaped or abandoned, including socialism, feminism, modernism, empire politics, trade unionism and welfarism. Organized around some of the central themes of political thought and utopian thinking, this impressive collection gathers together classic articles from key periodicals. The set presents a comprehensive sourcebook of readings on Edwardian/Progressive era feminist thought, exploring the intervention of the radical public intellectuals working in these traditions in North America and the UK from 1900-1918. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aDelap, Lucy,eeditor.1 aDiCenzo, Maria,eeditor.1 aRyan, Leila,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/feminism-and-the-periodicals-press-1900-1918/volumes/feminism-and-the-periodical-press-1900-1918-1 aBook02055nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450073002152600034002883000023003225000033003455200877003785380036012556500014012916500030013056500031013356500024013666500022013906500029014127000026014417000029014677000026014968560162015229750009016849780415320252UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153202528 a10.4324/9780415320252 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFeminism and the Periodicals Press 1900-1918h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe Edwardian period experienced a particularly vibrant periodical culture, with phenomenal growth in the numbers of titles published that were either aimed specifically at women, or else saw women as a key section of their readership or contributor group. It was an era of political ferment in which a number of 'progressive' traditions were formulated, shaped or abandoned, including socialism, feminism, modernism, empire politics, trade unionism and welfarism. Organized around some of the central themes of political thought and utopian thinking, this impressive collection gathers together classic articles from key periodicals. The set presents a comprehensive sourcebook of readings on Edwardian/Progressive era feminist thought, exploring the intervention of the radical public intellectuals working in these traditions in North America and the UK from 1900-1918. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aDelap, Lucy,eeditor.1 aDiCenzo, Maria,eeditor.1 aRyan, Leila,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/feminism-and-the-periodicals-press-1900-1918/volumes/feminism-and-the-periodical-press-1900-1918-2 aBook03252nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450061002152600034002763000023003105000033003335202183003665380036025496500014025856500030025996500031026296500024026606500022026846500029027067000031027357000033027668560094027999750009028939780415830409UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804158304098 a10.4324/9780415830409 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aGirl's School Stories, 1749-1929h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aAs part of the ongoing project of retrieving women writers from the margins of literary and cultural history, scholars of literature, history, and gender studies are increasingly exploring and interrogating girls' print culture. School stories, in particular, are generating substantial scholarly interest because of their centrality to the history of girls' reading, their engagement with cultural ideas about the education and socialization of girls, and their enduring popularity with book collectors. However, while serious scholars have begun to document the vast corpus of English-language girls' school stories, few scholarly editions or facsimile editions of these novels and short stories are readily available. Girls' School Stories in English, 1749 - 1929, a new title from Routledge and Edition Synapse's History of Feminism series, provides a vital resource to cater to this growing critical interest. This unique collection answers the important need to balance the historical record of canonical literature for young people in the nineteenth century and early twentieth century with popular fictions that had wide, devoted, and́following the emergence of school-series fictiońongoing readerships. Moreover, existing scholarship has not yet explicated the connections between the British genre and its adaptation to colonial and American readerships, and one of the functions of this collection is to document the evolution of the girls' school-story genre in Britain to pinpoint the development and contestation of its signature tropes, and to trace the refinement and reproduction of these elements in Canadian, Australian, and American print cultures. The six volumes in the collection cover the years 1749 to 1929, a temporal span designed to demonstrate the origins of the genre and its development throughout the Victorian and Edwardian eras. It concludes with works from the 1920s that coincide with a peak in the genre's popularity. And the thematic, rather than chronological, organization of the set allows users easily to compare and contrast (across time and place) school-story conventions and attitudes with issues such as women's higher education. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMoruzi, Kristine,eeditor.1 aSmith, Michelle J.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/girls-school-stories-1749-1929 aBook03275nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450052002152600034002673000023003015000033003245202183003575380036025406500014025766500030025906500031026206500024026516500022026756500029026977000031027267000033027578560126027909750009029169780415830454UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804158304548 a10.4324/9780415830454 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aDuty and Responsibilityh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aAs part of the ongoing project of retrieving women writers from the margins of literary and cultural history, scholars of literature, history, and gender studies are increasingly exploring and interrogating girls' print culture. School stories, in particular, are generating substantial scholarly interest because of their centrality to the history of girls' reading, their engagement with cultural ideas about the education and socialization of girls, and their enduring popularity with book collectors. However, while serious scholars have begun to document the vast corpus of English-language girls' school stories, few scholarly editions or facsimile editions of these novels and short stories are readily available. Girls' School Stories in English, 1749 - 1929, a new title from Routledge and Edition Synapse's History of Feminism series, provides a vital resource to cater to this growing critical interest. This unique collection answers the important need to balance the historical record of canonical literature for young people in the nineteenth century and early twentieth century with popular fictions that had wide, devoted, and́following the emergence of school-series fictiońongoing readerships. Moreover, existing scholarship has not yet explicated the connections between the British genre and its adaptation to colonial and American readerships, and one of the functions of this collection is to document the evolution of the girls' school-story genre in Britain to pinpoint the development and contestation of its signature tropes, and to trace the refinement and reproduction of these elements in Canadian, Australian, and American print cultures. The six volumes in the collection cover the years 1749 to 1929, a temporal span designed to demonstrate the origins of the genre and its development throughout the Victorian and Edwardian eras. It concludes with works from the 1920s that coincide with a peak in the genre's popularity. And the thematic, rather than chronological, organization of the set allows users easily to compare and contrast (across time and place) school-story conventions and attitudes with issues such as women's higher education. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMoruzi, Kristine,eeditor.1 aSmith, Michelle J.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/girls-school-stories-1749-1929/volumes/duty-and-responsibility aBook03265nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450047002152600034002623000023002965000033003195202183003525380036025356500014025716500030025856500031026156500024026466500022026706500029026927000031027217000033027528560121027859750009029069780415830461UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804158304618 a10.4324/9780415830461 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aFriendship and Funh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aAs part of the ongoing project of retrieving women writers from the margins of literary and cultural history, scholars of literature, history, and gender studies are increasingly exploring and interrogating girls' print culture. School stories, in particular, are generating substantial scholarly interest because of their centrality to the history of girls' reading, their engagement with cultural ideas about the education and socialization of girls, and their enduring popularity with book collectors. However, while serious scholars have begun to document the vast corpus of English-language girls' school stories, few scholarly editions or facsimile editions of these novels and short stories are readily available. Girls' School Stories in English, 1749 - 1929, a new title from Routledge and Edition Synapse's History of Feminism series, provides a vital resource to cater to this growing critical interest. This unique collection answers the important need to balance the historical record of canonical literature for young people in the nineteenth century and early twentieth century with popular fictions that had wide, devoted, and́following the emergence of school-series fictiońongoing readerships. Moreover, existing scholarship has not yet explicated the connections between the British genre and its adaptation to colonial and American readerships, and one of the functions of this collection is to document the evolution of the girls' school-story genre in Britain to pinpoint the development and contestation of its signature tropes, and to trace the refinement and reproduction of these elements in Canadian, Australian, and American print cultures. The six volumes in the collection cover the years 1749 to 1929, a temporal span designed to demonstrate the origins of the genre and its development throughout the Victorian and Edwardian eras. It concludes with works from the 1920s that coincide with a peak in the genre's popularity. And the thematic, rather than chronological, organization of the set allows users easily to compare and contrast (across time and place) school-story conventions and attitudes with issues such as women's higher education. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMoruzi, Kristine,eeditor.1 aSmith, Michelle J.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/girls-school-stories-1749-1929/volumes/friendship-and-fun aBook03298nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450064002152600034002793000023003135000033003365202183003695380036025526500014025886500030026026500031026326500024026636500022026876500029027097000031027387000033027698560137028029750009029399780415830478UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804158304788 a10.4324/9780415830478 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aHigher Education and Women's Rightsh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aAs part of the ongoing project of retrieving women writers from the margins of literary and cultural history, scholars of literature, history, and gender studies are increasingly exploring and interrogating girls' print culture. School stories, in particular, are generating substantial scholarly interest because of their centrality to the history of girls' reading, their engagement with cultural ideas about the education and socialization of girls, and their enduring popularity with book collectors. However, while serious scholars have begun to document the vast corpus of English-language girls' school stories, few scholarly editions or facsimile editions of these novels and short stories are readily available. Girls' School Stories in English, 1749 - 1929, a new title from Routledge and Edition Synapse's History of Feminism series, provides a vital resource to cater to this growing critical interest. This unique collection answers the important need to balance the historical record of canonical literature for young people in the nineteenth century and early twentieth century with popular fictions that had wide, devoted, and́following the emergence of school-series fictiońongoing readerships. Moreover, existing scholarship has not yet explicated the connections between the British genre and its adaptation to colonial and American readerships, and one of the functions of this collection is to document the evolution of the girls' school-story genre in Britain to pinpoint the development and contestation of its signature tropes, and to trace the refinement and reproduction of these elements in Canadian, Australian, and American print cultures. The six volumes in the collection cover the years 1749 to 1929, a temporal span designed to demonstrate the origins of the genre and its development throughout the Victorian and Edwardian eras. It concludes with works from the 1920s that coincide with a peak in the genre's popularity. And the thematic, rather than chronological, organization of the set allows users easily to compare and contrast (across time and place) school-story conventions and attitudes with issues such as women's higher education. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMoruzi, Kristine,eeditor.1 aSmith, Michelle J.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/girls-school-stories-1749-1929/volumes/higher-education-and-womens-rights aBook03259nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450044002152600034002593000023002935000033003165202183003495380036025326500014025686500030025826500031026126500024026436500022026676500029026897000031027187000033027498560118027829750009029009780415830423UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804158304238 a10.4324/9780415830423 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMoral Educationh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aAs part of the ongoing project of retrieving women writers from the margins of literary and cultural history, scholars of literature, history, and gender studies are increasingly exploring and interrogating girls' print culture. School stories, in particular, are generating substantial scholarly interest because of their centrality to the history of girls' reading, their engagement with cultural ideas about the education and socialization of girls, and their enduring popularity with book collectors. However, while serious scholars have begun to document the vast corpus of English-language girls' school stories, few scholarly editions or facsimile editions of these novels and short stories are readily available. Girls' School Stories in English, 1749 - 1929, a new title from Routledge and Edition Synapse's History of Feminism series, provides a vital resource to cater to this growing critical interest. This unique collection answers the important need to balance the historical record of canonical literature for young people in the nineteenth century and early twentieth century with popular fictions that had wide, devoted, and́following the emergence of school-series fictiońongoing readerships. Moreover, existing scholarship has not yet explicated the connections between the British genre and its adaptation to colonial and American readerships, and one of the functions of this collection is to document the evolution of the girls' school-story genre in Britain to pinpoint the development and contestation of its signature tropes, and to trace the refinement and reproduction of these elements in Canadian, Australian, and American print cultures. The six volumes in the collection cover the years 1749 to 1929, a temporal span designed to demonstrate the origins of the genre and its development throughout the Victorian and Edwardian eras. It concludes with works from the 1920s that coincide with a peak in the genre's popularity. And the thematic, rather than chronological, organization of the set allows users easily to compare and contrast (across time and place) school-story conventions and attitudes with issues such as women's higher education. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMoruzi, Kristine,eeditor.1 aSmith, Michelle J.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/girls-school-stories-1749-1929/volumes/moral-education aBook03253nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450041002152600034002563000023002905000033003135202183003465380036025296500014025656500030025796500031026096500024026406500022026646500029026867000031027157000033027468560115027799750009028949780415830430UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804158304308 a10.4324/9780415830430 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe New Girlh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aAs part of the ongoing project of retrieving women writers from the margins of literary and cultural history, scholars of literature, history, and gender studies are increasingly exploring and interrogating girls' print culture. School stories, in particular, are generating substantial scholarly interest because of their centrality to the history of girls' reading, their engagement with cultural ideas about the education and socialization of girls, and their enduring popularity with book collectors. However, while serious scholars have begun to document the vast corpus of English-language girls' school stories, few scholarly editions or facsimile editions of these novels and short stories are readily available. Girls' School Stories in English, 1749 - 1929, a new title from Routledge and Edition Synapse's History of Feminism series, provides a vital resource to cater to this growing critical interest. This unique collection answers the important need to balance the historical record of canonical literature for young people in the nineteenth century and early twentieth century with popular fictions that had wide, devoted, and́following the emergence of school-series fictiońongoing readerships. Moreover, existing scholarship has not yet explicated the connections between the British genre and its adaptation to colonial and American readerships, and one of the functions of this collection is to document the evolution of the girls' school-story genre in Britain to pinpoint the development and contestation of its signature tropes, and to trace the refinement and reproduction of these elements in Canadian, Australian, and American print cultures. The six volumes in the collection cover the years 1749 to 1929, a temporal span designed to demonstrate the origins of the genre and its development throughout the Victorian and Edwardian eras. It concludes with works from the 1920s that coincide with a peak in the genre's popularity. And the thematic, rather than chronological, organization of the set allows users easily to compare and contrast (across time and place) school-story conventions and attitudes with issues such as women's higher education. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMoruzi, Kristine,eeditor.1 aSmith, Michelle J.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/girls-school-stories-1749-1929/volumes/the-new-girl aBook03263nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450046002152600034002613000023002955000033003185202183003515380036025346500014025706500030025846500031026146500024026456500022026696500029026917000031027207000033027518560120027849750009029049780415830447UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804158304478 a10.4324/9780415830447 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aUnruly Femininityh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aAs part of the ongoing project of retrieving women writers from the margins of literary and cultural history, scholars of literature, history, and gender studies are increasingly exploring and interrogating girls' print culture. School stories, in particular, are generating substantial scholarly interest because of their centrality to the history of girls' reading, their engagement with cultural ideas about the education and socialization of girls, and their enduring popularity with book collectors. However, while serious scholars have begun to document the vast corpus of English-language girls' school stories, few scholarly editions or facsimile editions of these novels and short stories are readily available. Girls' School Stories in English, 1749 - 1929, a new title from Routledge and Edition Synapse's History of Feminism series, provides a vital resource to cater to this growing critical interest. This unique collection answers the important need to balance the historical record of canonical literature for young people in the nineteenth century and early twentieth century with popular fictions that had wide, devoted, and́following the emergence of school-series fictiońongoing readerships. Moreover, existing scholarship has not yet explicated the connections between the British genre and its adaptation to colonial and American readerships, and one of the functions of this collection is to document the evolution of the girls' school-story genre in Britain to pinpoint the development and contestation of its signature tropes, and to trace the refinement and reproduction of these elements in Canadian, Australian, and American print cultures. The six volumes in the collection cover the years 1749 to 1929, a temporal span designed to demonstrate the origins of the genre and its development throughout the Victorian and Edwardian eras. It concludes with works from the 1920s that coincide with a peak in the genre's popularity. And the thematic, rather than chronological, organization of the set allows users easily to compare and contrast (across time and place) school-story conventions and attitudes with issues such as women's higher education. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMoruzi, Kristine,eeditor.1 aSmith, Michelle J.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/girls-school-stories-1749-1929/volumes/unruly-femininity aBook04665nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450055002152600034002703000023003045000033003275203653003605380036040136500014040496500030040636500031040936500024041246500022041486500029041707000030041998560089042299750009043189780415475297UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154752978 a10.4324/9780415475297 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aIrish Feminisms, 1810-1930h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aCo-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, the History of Feminism series makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of women's and gender studies, women's history, and women's writing, as well as those working in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by an expert editor, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. This new title in the series brings together a unique selection of the multiple feminisms articulated by Irish writers between 1810 and 1930, a 'long Victorian' period. The five volumes foreground a multiplicity of beliefs and attitudes from novels, poetry, short stories, newspaper and journal articles, and essays, both by relatively unknown and by more celebrated writers (such as Lady Gregory, Lady Wilde, and the Parnells). While the history of feminism consistently and universally reveals conflicting interpretations of the female role in society, the situation in Ireland was significantly complicated by the backdrop of national uprisings, land war, world war, and the growing hegemony of a strongly religious patriarchy. In particular, the collection makes apparent the disparities of interest as writers confront, or covertly negotiate, the burning issues of education, suffrage, and participation in charitable work or politics. Female frustrations, and collusion, with societal norms are documented in each of the thematically organized volumes. Volume I ('Leading the Way') includes key ideological articulations of Irish feminist beliefs. Volume II ('Land and Labour') is a collection of vital materials which show the intermeshing of women's concerns with prevailing political turmoil. The question mark in the title of Volume III ('Eire Ab©ð?' ('Ireland Forever?')) hints at the uncertainties facing women in any New Ireland. These fears are reflected in the materials reproduced in this volume, which contains work by the redoubtable Sheehy Skeffingtons, by the strongly feminist Haslams, and by Yeats's beloved Maud Gonne. Nationalistic and feminist prose and poetry by sisters Countess Markievicz and Eva Gore-Booth́portrayed by Yeats as 'one beautiful, the other a gazelle'́is also included in this volume. Bringing together extracts from biography, fiction, poetry and bitter-sweet drama, Volume IV ('In the Real World') is a repository of vital work which engaged with education, social and sexual mores, marriage, and religious life and the novel Callaghan is its fitting and concluding text. Finally, Volume V ('Literary Approaches') highlights disparate expressions of the evolving Irish attitudes to feminist issues, from the competing spheres of the convent and secular world (George Moore's 'The Exile'), to challenges to fixed notions of gender (K. C. Thurston's Max). The sheer diversity of poetical contributions is fascinating. Most texts in this collection have either not appeared at all since their first publication, or have never been reprinted in their entirety; the remainder have been extremely difficult to find. Their collocation and juxtaposition in these volumes provides a unique insight into a multiplicity of Irish feminisms, and vividly recreates the literary and historical climate in which they were written. With its comprehensive introductions, (which furnish vital background information), this ground-breaking collection is destined to be welcomed as a treasure-trove by all serious scholars and students of Gender and Irish Studieśas well as those working in Victorian and Literary Studies. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPierse, Mary S.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/irish-feminisms-1810-1930 aBook04672nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450045002152600034002603000023002945000033003175203653003505380036040036500014040396500030040536500031040836500024041146500022041386500029041607000030041898560106042199750009043259780415475327UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154753278 a10.4324/9780415475327 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910a©œire ab©ð?.h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aCo-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, the History of Feminism series makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of women's and gender studies, women's history, and women's writing, as well as those working in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by an expert editor, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. This new title in the series brings together a unique selection of the multiple feminisms articulated by Irish writers between 1810 and 1930, a 'long Victorian' period. The five volumes foreground a multiplicity of beliefs and attitudes from novels, poetry, short stories, newspaper and journal articles, and essays, both by relatively unknown and by more celebrated writers (such as Lady Gregory, Lady Wilde, and the Parnells). While the history of feminism consistently and universally reveals conflicting interpretations of the female role in society, the situation in Ireland was significantly complicated by the backdrop of national uprisings, land war, world war, and the growing hegemony of a strongly religious patriarchy. In particular, the collection makes apparent the disparities of interest as writers confront, or covertly negotiate, the burning issues of education, suffrage, and participation in charitable work or politics. Female frustrations, and collusion, with societal norms are documented in each of the thematically organized volumes. Volume I ('Leading the Way') includes key ideological articulations of Irish feminist beliefs. Volume II ('Land and Labour') is a collection of vital materials which show the intermeshing of women's concerns with prevailing political turmoil. The question mark in the title of Volume III ('Eire Ab©ð?' ('Ireland Forever?')) hints at the uncertainties facing women in any New Ireland. These fears are reflected in the materials reproduced in this volume, which contains work by the redoubtable Sheehy Skeffingtons, by the strongly feminist Haslams, and by Yeats's beloved Maud Gonne. Nationalistic and feminist prose and poetry by sisters Countess Markievicz and Eva Gore-Booth́portrayed by Yeats as 'one beautiful, the other a gazelle'́is also included in this volume. Bringing together extracts from biography, fiction, poetry and bitter-sweet drama, Volume IV ('In the Real World') is a repository of vital work which engaged with education, social and sexual mores, marriage, and religious life and the novel Callaghan is its fitting and concluding text. Finally, Volume V ('Literary Approaches') highlights disparate expressions of the evolving Irish attitudes to feminist issues, from the competing spheres of the convent and secular world (George Moore's 'The Exile'), to challenges to fixed notions of gender (K. C. Thurston's Max). The sheer diversity of poetical contributions is fascinating. Most texts in this collection have either not appeared at all since their first publication, or have never been reprinted in their entirety; the remainder have been extremely difficult to find. Their collocation and juxtaposition in these volumes provides a unique insight into a multiplicity of Irish feminisms, and vividly recreates the literary and historical climate in which they were written. With its comprehensive introductions, (which furnish vital background information), this ground-breaking collection is destined to be welcomed as a treasure-trove by all serious scholars and students of Gender and Irish Studieśas well as those working in Victorian and Literary Studies. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPierse, Mary S.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/irish-feminisms-1810-1930/volumes/eire-abu aBook04682nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450046002152600034002613000023002955000033003185203653003515380036040046500014040406500030040546500031040846500024041156500022041396500029041617000030041908560115042209750009043359780415475334UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154753348 a10.4324/9780415475334 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aIn the Real Worldh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aCo-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, the History of Feminism series makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of women's and gender studies, women's history, and women's writing, as well as those working in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by an expert editor, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. This new title in the series brings together a unique selection of the multiple feminisms articulated by Irish writers between 1810 and 1930, a 'long Victorian' period. The five volumes foreground a multiplicity of beliefs and attitudes from novels, poetry, short stories, newspaper and journal articles, and essays, both by relatively unknown and by more celebrated writers (such as Lady Gregory, Lady Wilde, and the Parnells). While the history of feminism consistently and universally reveals conflicting interpretations of the female role in society, the situation in Ireland was significantly complicated by the backdrop of national uprisings, land war, world war, and the growing hegemony of a strongly religious patriarchy. In particular, the collection makes apparent the disparities of interest as writers confront, or covertly negotiate, the burning issues of education, suffrage, and participation in charitable work or politics. Female frustrations, and collusion, with societal norms are documented in each of the thematically organized volumes. Volume I ('Leading the Way') includes key ideological articulations of Irish feminist beliefs. Volume II ('Land and Labour') is a collection of vital materials which show the intermeshing of women's concerns with prevailing political turmoil. The question mark in the title of Volume III ('Eire Ab©ð?' ('Ireland Forever?')) hints at the uncertainties facing women in any New Ireland. These fears are reflected in the materials reproduced in this volume, which contains work by the redoubtable Sheehy Skeffingtons, by the strongly feminist Haslams, and by Yeats's beloved Maud Gonne. Nationalistic and feminist prose and poetry by sisters Countess Markievicz and Eva Gore-Booth́portrayed by Yeats as 'one beautiful, the other a gazelle'́is also included in this volume. Bringing together extracts from biography, fiction, poetry and bitter-sweet drama, Volume IV ('In the Real World') is a repository of vital work which engaged with education, social and sexual mores, marriage, and religious life and the novel Callaghan is its fitting and concluding text. Finally, Volume V ('Literary Approaches') highlights disparate expressions of the evolving Irish attitudes to feminist issues, from the competing spheres of the convent and secular world (George Moore's 'The Exile'), to challenges to fixed notions of gender (K. C. Thurston's Max). The sheer diversity of poetical contributions is fascinating. Most texts in this collection have either not appeared at all since their first publication, or have never been reprinted in their entirety; the remainder have been extremely difficult to find. Their collocation and juxtaposition in these volumes provides a unique insight into a multiplicity of Irish feminisms, and vividly recreates the literary and historical climate in which they were written. With its comprehensive introductions, (which furnish vital background information), this ground-breaking collection is destined to be welcomed as a treasure-trove by all serious scholars and students of Gender and Irish Studieśas well as those working in Victorian and Literary Studies. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPierse, Mary S.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/irish-feminisms-1810-1930/volumes/in-the-real-world aBook04678nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450044002152600034002593000023002935000033003165203653003495380036040026500014040386500030040526500031040826500024041136500022041376500029041597000030041888560113042189750009043319780415475310UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154753108 a10.4324/9780415475310 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aLand and labourh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aCo-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, the History of Feminism series makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of women's and gender studies, women's history, and women's writing, as well as those working in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by an expert editor, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. This new title in the series brings together a unique selection of the multiple feminisms articulated by Irish writers between 1810 and 1930, a 'long Victorian' period. The five volumes foreground a multiplicity of beliefs and attitudes from novels, poetry, short stories, newspaper and journal articles, and essays, both by relatively unknown and by more celebrated writers (such as Lady Gregory, Lady Wilde, and the Parnells). While the history of feminism consistently and universally reveals conflicting interpretations of the female role in society, the situation in Ireland was significantly complicated by the backdrop of national uprisings, land war, world war, and the growing hegemony of a strongly religious patriarchy. In particular, the collection makes apparent the disparities of interest as writers confront, or covertly negotiate, the burning issues of education, suffrage, and participation in charitable work or politics. Female frustrations, and collusion, with societal norms are documented in each of the thematically organized volumes. Volume I ('Leading the Way') includes key ideological articulations of Irish feminist beliefs. Volume II ('Land and Labour') is a collection of vital materials which show the intermeshing of women's concerns with prevailing political turmoil. The question mark in the title of Volume III ('Eire Ab©ð?' ('Ireland Forever?')) hints at the uncertainties facing women in any New Ireland. These fears are reflected in the materials reproduced in this volume, which contains work by the redoubtable Sheehy Skeffingtons, by the strongly feminist Haslams, and by Yeats's beloved Maud Gonne. Nationalistic and feminist prose and poetry by sisters Countess Markievicz and Eva Gore-Booth́portrayed by Yeats as 'one beautiful, the other a gazelle'́is also included in this volume. Bringing together extracts from biography, fiction, poetry and bitter-sweet drama, Volume IV ('In the Real World') is a repository of vital work which engaged with education, social and sexual mores, marriage, and religious life and the novel Callaghan is its fitting and concluding text. Finally, Volume V ('Literary Approaches') highlights disparate expressions of the evolving Irish attitudes to feminist issues, from the competing spheres of the convent and secular world (George Moore's 'The Exile'), to challenges to fixed notions of gender (K. C. Thurston's Max). The sheer diversity of poetical contributions is fascinating. Most texts in this collection have either not appeared at all since their first publication, or have never been reprinted in their entirety; the remainder have been extremely difficult to find. Their collocation and juxtaposition in these volumes provides a unique insight into a multiplicity of Irish feminisms, and vividly recreates the literary and historical climate in which they were written. With its comprehensive introductions, (which furnish vital background information), this ground-breaking collection is destined to be welcomed as a treasure-trove by all serious scholars and students of Gender and Irish Studieśas well as those working in Victorian and Literary Studies. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPierse, Mary S.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/irish-feminisms-1810-1930/volumes/land-and-labour aBook04678nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450044002152600034002593000023002935000033003165203653003495380036040026500014040386500030040526500031040826500024041136500022041376500029041597000030041888560113042189750009043319780415475303UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154753038 a10.4324/9780415475303 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aLeading the Wayh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aCo-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, the History of Feminism series makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of women's and gender studies, women's history, and women's writing, as well as those working in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by an expert editor, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. This new title in the series brings together a unique selection of the multiple feminisms articulated by Irish writers between 1810 and 1930, a 'long Victorian' period. The five volumes foreground a multiplicity of beliefs and attitudes from novels, poetry, short stories, newspaper and journal articles, and essays, both by relatively unknown and by more celebrated writers (such as Lady Gregory, Lady Wilde, and the Parnells). While the history of feminism consistently and universally reveals conflicting interpretations of the female role in society, the situation in Ireland was significantly complicated by the backdrop of national uprisings, land war, world war, and the growing hegemony of a strongly religious patriarchy. In particular, the collection makes apparent the disparities of interest as writers confront, or covertly negotiate, the burning issues of education, suffrage, and participation in charitable work or politics. Female frustrations, and collusion, with societal norms are documented in each of the thematically organized volumes. Volume I ('Leading the Way') includes key ideological articulations of Irish feminist beliefs. Volume II ('Land and Labour') is a collection of vital materials which show the intermeshing of women's concerns with prevailing political turmoil. The question mark in the title of Volume III ('Eire Ab©ð?' ('Ireland Forever?')) hints at the uncertainties facing women in any New Ireland. These fears are reflected in the materials reproduced in this volume, which contains work by the redoubtable Sheehy Skeffingtons, by the strongly feminist Haslams, and by Yeats's beloved Maud Gonne. Nationalistic and feminist prose and poetry by sisters Countess Markievicz and Eva Gore-Booth́portrayed by Yeats as 'one beautiful, the other a gazelle'́is also included in this volume. Bringing together extracts from biography, fiction, poetry and bitter-sweet drama, Volume IV ('In the Real World') is a repository of vital work which engaged with education, social and sexual mores, marriage, and religious life and the novel Callaghan is its fitting and concluding text. Finally, Volume V ('Literary Approaches') highlights disparate expressions of the evolving Irish attitudes to feminist issues, from the competing spheres of the convent and secular world (George Moore's 'The Exile'), to challenges to fixed notions of gender (K. C. Thurston's Max). The sheer diversity of poetical contributions is fascinating. Most texts in this collection have either not appeared at all since their first publication, or have never been reprinted in their entirety; the remainder have been extremely difficult to find. Their collocation and juxtaposition in these volumes provides a unique insight into a multiplicity of Irish feminisms, and vividly recreates the literary and historical climate in which they were written. With its comprehensive introductions, (which furnish vital background information), this ground-breaking collection is destined to be welcomed as a treasure-trove by all serious scholars and students of Gender and Irish Studieśas well as those working in Victorian and Literary Studies. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPierse, Mary S.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/irish-feminisms-1810-1930/volumes/leading-the-way aBook04686nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450048002152600034002633000023002975000033003205203653003535380036040066500014040426500030040566500031040866500024041176500022041416500029041637000030041928560117042229750009043399780415475341UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154753418 a10.4324/9780415475341 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aLiterary Approachesh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aCo-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, the History of Feminism series makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of women's and gender studies, women's history, and women's writing, as well as those working in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by an expert editor, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. This new title in the series brings together a unique selection of the multiple feminisms articulated by Irish writers between 1810 and 1930, a 'long Victorian' period. The five volumes foreground a multiplicity of beliefs and attitudes from novels, poetry, short stories, newspaper and journal articles, and essays, both by relatively unknown and by more celebrated writers (such as Lady Gregory, Lady Wilde, and the Parnells). While the history of feminism consistently and universally reveals conflicting interpretations of the female role in society, the situation in Ireland was significantly complicated by the backdrop of national uprisings, land war, world war, and the growing hegemony of a strongly religious patriarchy. In particular, the collection makes apparent the disparities of interest as writers confront, or covertly negotiate, the burning issues of education, suffrage, and participation in charitable work or politics. Female frustrations, and collusion, with societal norms are documented in each of the thematically organized volumes. Volume I ('Leading the Way') includes key ideological articulations of Irish feminist beliefs. Volume II ('Land and Labour') is a collection of vital materials which show the intermeshing of women's concerns with prevailing political turmoil. The question mark in the title of Volume III ('Eire Ab©ð?' ('Ireland Forever?')) hints at the uncertainties facing women in any New Ireland. These fears are reflected in the materials reproduced in this volume, which contains work by the redoubtable Sheehy Skeffingtons, by the strongly feminist Haslams, and by Yeats's beloved Maud Gonne. Nationalistic and feminist prose and poetry by sisters Countess Markievicz and Eva Gore-Booth́portrayed by Yeats as 'one beautiful, the other a gazelle'́is also included in this volume. Bringing together extracts from biography, fiction, poetry and bitter-sweet drama, Volume IV ('In the Real World') is a repository of vital work which engaged with education, social and sexual mores, marriage, and religious life and the novel Callaghan is its fitting and concluding text. Finally, Volume V ('Literary Approaches') highlights disparate expressions of the evolving Irish attitudes to feminist issues, from the competing spheres of the convent and secular world (George Moore's 'The Exile'), to challenges to fixed notions of gender (K. C. Thurston's Max). The sheer diversity of poetical contributions is fascinating. Most texts in this collection have either not appeared at all since their first publication, or have never been reprinted in their entirety; the remainder have been extremely difficult to find. Their collocation and juxtaposition in these volumes provides a unique insight into a multiplicity of Irish feminisms, and vividly recreates the literary and historical climate in which they were written. With its comprehensive introductions, (which furnish vital background information), this ground-breaking collection is destined to be welcomed as a treasure-trove by all serious scholars and students of Gender and Irish Studieśas well as those working in Victorian and Literary Studies. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPierse, Mary S.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/irish-feminisms-1810-1930/volumes/literary-approaches aBook02826nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450108002152600034003233000023003575000033003805201702004135380036021156500014021516500030021656500031021956500024022266500022022506500029022727000027023017000028023288560111023569750009024679780415226844UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804152268448 a10.4324/9780415226844 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aJosephine Butler and the Prostitution Campaignsh[electronic resource] :bDiseases of the Body Politic. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis five volume set deals in detail with Josephine Butler's campaign for the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts in Britain and the Colonies. At present, access to Butler's work is restricted as a number of relevant anthologies are out of print. The bulk of these can only be read in specialist libraries and the original copies are becoming increasingly fragile after a century of use. This edited collection makes her writing accessible once again, setting it in an appropriate historical context. In addition to Butler's own work, the thematically ordered volumes include related texts which are important for understanding her campaign. This allows the reader to position Josephine Butler in relation to her opponents and to follow the response to her activities. All the texts are complete and reproduced in facsimile - there are pamphlets, books, media responses to Butler's activities, letters to The Times, articles from The Lancet, Pall Mall Gazette, The Shield and The Dawn as well as private letters both to and from Butler. The set is introduced through a substantial essay by Jane Jordan, one of the leading international scholars on Butler's life and works, and each volume contains a short introduction by the editors which contextualises the selections. Butler writes clearly and vividly, combining impeccable logic with passionate commitment. She does not soften her message to protect the sensibilities of her audience. She is uncompromising in her analysis, determined to 'set a floodlight on your doings' as she told a stunned royal commission in 1871. Josephine Butler and the Prostitution Campaigns demonstrates the great importance of this fascinating campaigner's work. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aJordan, Jane,eeditor.1 aSharp, Ingrid,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/josephine-butler-and-the-prostitution-campaigns aBook02798nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450070002152600034002853000023003195000033003425201702003755380036020776500014021136500030021276500031021576500024021886500022022126500029022347000027022638560161022909750009024519780415226882UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804152268828 a10.4324/9780415226882 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aChild Prostitution and the Age of Consenth[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis five volume set deals in detail with Josephine Butler's campaign for the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts in Britain and the Colonies. At present, access to Butler's work is restricted as a number of relevant anthologies are out of print. The bulk of these can only be read in specialist libraries and the original copies are becoming increasingly fragile after a century of use. This edited collection makes her writing accessible once again, setting it in an appropriate historical context. In addition to Butler's own work, the thematically ordered volumes include related texts which are important for understanding her campaign. This allows the reader to position Josephine Butler in relation to her opponents and to follow the response to her activities. All the texts are complete and reproduced in facsimile - there are pamphlets, books, media responses to Butler's activities, letters to The Times, articles from The Lancet, Pall Mall Gazette, The Shield and The Dawn as well as private letters both to and from Butler. The set is introduced through a substantial essay by Jane Jordan, one of the leading international scholars on Butler's life and works, and each volume contains a short introduction by the editors which contextualises the selections. Butler writes clearly and vividly, combining impeccable logic with passionate commitment. She does not soften her message to protect the sensibilities of her audience. She is uncompromising in her analysis, determined to 'set a floodlight on your doings' as she told a stunned royal commission in 1871. Josephine Butler and the Prostitution Campaigns demonstrates the great importance of this fascinating campaigner's work. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aJordan, Jane,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/josephine-butler-and-the-prostitution-campaigns/volumes/child-prostitution-and-the-age-of-consent aBook02796nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450084002152600034002993000023003335000033003565201702003895380036020916500014021276500030021416500031021716500024022026500022022266500029022487000027022778560145023049750009024499780415226875UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804152268758 a10.4324/9780415226875 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Constitution Violatedh[electronic resource] :bThe Parliamentary Campaign. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis five volume set deals in detail with Josephine Butler's campaign for the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts in Britain and the Colonies. At present, access to Butler's work is restricted as a number of relevant anthologies are out of print. The bulk of these can only be read in specialist libraries and the original copies are becoming increasingly fragile after a century of use. This edited collection makes her writing accessible once again, setting it in an appropriate historical context. In addition to Butler's own work, the thematically ordered volumes include related texts which are important for understanding her campaign. This allows the reader to position Josephine Butler in relation to her opponents and to follow the response to her activities. All the texts are complete and reproduced in facsimile - there are pamphlets, books, media responses to Butler's activities, letters to The Times, articles from The Lancet, Pall Mall Gazette, The Shield and The Dawn as well as private letters both to and from Butler. The set is introduced through a substantial essay by Jane Jordan, one of the leading international scholars on Butler's life and works, and each volume contains a short introduction by the editors which contextualises the selections. Butler writes clearly and vividly, combining impeccable logic with passionate commitment. She does not soften her message to protect the sensibilities of her audience. She is uncompromising in her analysis, determined to 'set a floodlight on your doings' as she told a stunned royal commission in 1871. Josephine Butler and the Prostitution Campaigns demonstrates the great importance of this fascinating campaigner's work. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aJordan, Jane,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/josephine-butler-and-the-prostitution-campaigns/volumes/the-constitution-violated aBook02775nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450059002152600034002743000023003085000033003315201702003645380036020666500014021026500030021166500031021466500024021776500022022016500029022237000027022528560149022799750009024289780415226868UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804152268688 a10.4324/9780415226868 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Ladies' Appeal and Protesth[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis five volume set deals in detail with Josephine Butler's campaign for the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts in Britain and the Colonies. At present, access to Butler's work is restricted as a number of relevant anthologies are out of print. The bulk of these can only be read in specialist libraries and the original copies are becoming increasingly fragile after a century of use. This edited collection makes her writing accessible once again, setting it in an appropriate historical context. In addition to Butler's own work, the thematically ordered volumes include related texts which are important for understanding her campaign. This allows the reader to position Josephine Butler in relation to her opponents and to follow the response to her activities. All the texts are complete and reproduced in facsimile - there are pamphlets, books, media responses to Butler's activities, letters to The Times, articles from The Lancet, Pall Mall Gazette, The Shield and The Dawn as well as private letters both to and from Butler. The set is introduced through a substantial essay by Jane Jordan, one of the leading international scholars on Butler's life and works, and each volume contains a short introduction by the editors which contextualises the selections. Butler writes clearly and vividly, combining impeccable logic with passionate commitment. She does not soften her message to protect the sensibilities of her audience. She is uncompromising in her analysis, determined to 'set a floodlight on your doings' as she told a stunned royal commission in 1871. Josephine Butler and the Prostitution Campaigns demonstrates the great importance of this fascinating campaigner's work. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aJordan, Jane,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/josephine-butler-and-the-prostitution-campaigns/volumes/the-ladies-appeal-and-protest aBook02795nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450068002152600034002833000023003175000033003405201702003735380036020756500014021116500030021256500031021556500024021866500022022106500029022327000028022618560159022899750009024489780415226851UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804152268518 a10.4324/9780415226851 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Moral Reclaimability of Prostitutesh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis five volume set deals in detail with Josephine Butler's campaign for the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts in Britain and the Colonies. At present, access to Butler's work is restricted as a number of relevant anthologies are out of print. The bulk of these can only be read in specialist libraries and the original copies are becoming increasingly fragile after a century of use. This edited collection makes her writing accessible once again, setting it in an appropriate historical context. In addition to Butler's own work, the thematically ordered volumes include related texts which are important for understanding her campaign. This allows the reader to position Josephine Butler in relation to her opponents and to follow the response to her activities. All the texts are complete and reproduced in facsimile - there are pamphlets, books, media responses to Butler's activities, letters to The Times, articles from The Lancet, Pall Mall Gazette, The Shield and The Dawn as well as private letters both to and from Butler. The set is introduced through a substantial essay by Jane Jordan, one of the leading international scholars on Butler's life and works, and each volume contains a short introduction by the editors which contextualises the selections. Butler writes clearly and vividly, combining impeccable logic with passionate commitment. She does not soften her message to protect the sensibilities of her audience. She is uncompromising in her analysis, determined to 'set a floodlight on your doings' as she told a stunned royal commission in 1871. Josephine Butler and the Prostitution Campaigns demonstrates the great importance of this fascinating campaigner's work. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aSharp, Ingrid,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/josephine-butler-and-the-prostitution-campaigns/volumes/the-moral-reclaimability-of-prostitutes aBook02776nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450059002152600034002743000023003085000033003315201702003645380036020666500014021026500030021166500031021466500024021776500022022016500029022237000028022528560149022809750009024299780415226899UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804152268998 a10.4324/9780415226899 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Queen's Daughters in Indiah[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis five volume set deals in detail with Josephine Butler's campaign for the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts in Britain and the Colonies. At present, access to Butler's work is restricted as a number of relevant anthologies are out of print. The bulk of these can only be read in specialist libraries and the original copies are becoming increasingly fragile after a century of use. This edited collection makes her writing accessible once again, setting it in an appropriate historical context. In addition to Butler's own work, the thematically ordered volumes include related texts which are important for understanding her campaign. This allows the reader to position Josephine Butler in relation to her opponents and to follow the response to her activities. All the texts are complete and reproduced in facsimile - there are pamphlets, books, media responses to Butler's activities, letters to The Times, articles from The Lancet, Pall Mall Gazette, The Shield and The Dawn as well as private letters both to and from Butler. The set is introduced through a substantial essay by Jane Jordan, one of the leading international scholars on Butler's life and works, and each volume contains a short introduction by the editors which contextualises the selections. Butler writes clearly and vividly, combining impeccable logic with passionate commitment. She does not soften her message to protect the sensibilities of her audience. She is uncompromising in her analysis, determined to 'set a floodlight on your doings' as she told a stunned royal commission in 1871. Josephine Butler and the Prostitution Campaigns demonstrates the great importance of this fascinating campaigner's work. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aSharp, Ingrid,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/josephine-butler-and-the-prostitution-campaigns/volumes/the-queens-daughters-in-india aBook02138nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450053002152600034002683000023003025000033003255201131003585380036014896500014015256500030015396500031015696500024016006500022016246500029016467000028016758560088017039750009017919780415403313UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154033138 a10.4324/9780415403313 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMedical Advice for Womenh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMedical Advice for Women is a new five-volume collection from Routledge and Edition Synapse covering professional, scientific, and medical opinion, in addition to the popular guides aimed at the female reader, between the years 1830 - 1915. Medical literature from this period provides a fascinating insight into the interrelations between social proscriptions, often validated by appeals to religious authority, and medical prescriptions. The narrative contained within this largely chronological collection is not necessarily a progressive one from quackery to medical and scientific enlightenment; the situation was more nuanced than selective quotation from sensational examples has implied in the past. This collection, edited and with a new introduction by Ruth Robbins, illuminates the complexity and shifting grounds of opinion in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by bringing back into print a broad selection of texts offering medical advice to women, and will be of interest to all scholars and students working in gender and cultural studies, and particularly to historians and sociologists of medicine. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aRobbins, Ruth,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/medical-advice-for-women aBook02193nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450065002152600034002803000023003145000033003375201131003705380036015016500014015376500030015516500031015816500024016126500022016366500029016587000028016878560131017159750009018469780415403320UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154033208 a10.4324/9780415403320 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMedical Advice for Women 1830 - 1915h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMedical Advice for Women is a new five-volume collection from Routledge and Edition Synapse covering professional, scientific, and medical opinion, in addition to the popular guides aimed at the female reader, between the years 1830 - 1915. Medical literature from this period provides a fascinating insight into the interrelations between social proscriptions, often validated by appeals to religious authority, and medical prescriptions. The narrative contained within this largely chronological collection is not necessarily a progressive one from quackery to medical and scientific enlightenment; the situation was more nuanced than selective quotation from sensational examples has implied in the past. This collection, edited and with a new introduction by Ruth Robbins, illuminates the complexity and shifting grounds of opinion in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by bringing back into print a broad selection of texts offering medical advice to women, and will be of interest to all scholars and students working in gender and cultural studies, and particularly to historians and sociologists of medicine. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aRobbins, Ruth,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/medical-advice-for-women/volumes/medical-advice-for-women-1830-1915 aBook02195nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450065002152600034002803000023003145000033003375201131003705380036015016500014015376500030015516500031015816500024016126500022016366500029016587000028016878560133017159750009018489780415403337UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154033378 a10.4324/9780415403337 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMedical Advice for Women 1830 - 1915h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMedical Advice for Women is a new five-volume collection from Routledge and Edition Synapse covering professional, scientific, and medical opinion, in addition to the popular guides aimed at the female reader, between the years 1830 - 1915. Medical literature from this period provides a fascinating insight into the interrelations between social proscriptions, often validated by appeals to religious authority, and medical prescriptions. The narrative contained within this largely chronological collection is not necessarily a progressive one from quackery to medical and scientific enlightenment; the situation was more nuanced than selective quotation from sensational examples has implied in the past. This collection, edited and with a new introduction by Ruth Robbins, illuminates the complexity and shifting grounds of opinion in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by bringing back into print a broad selection of texts offering medical advice to women, and will be of interest to all scholars and students working in gender and cultural studies, and particularly to historians and sociologists of medicine. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aRobbins, Ruth,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/medical-advice-for-women/volumes/medical-advice-for-women-1830-1915-1 aBook02195nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450065002152600034002803000023003145000033003375201131003705380036015016500014015376500030015516500031015816500024016126500022016366500029016587000028016878560133017159750009018489780415403344UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154033448 a10.4324/9780415403344 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMedical Advice for Women 1830 - 1915h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMedical Advice for Women is a new five-volume collection from Routledge and Edition Synapse covering professional, scientific, and medical opinion, in addition to the popular guides aimed at the female reader, between the years 1830 - 1915. Medical literature from this period provides a fascinating insight into the interrelations between social proscriptions, often validated by appeals to religious authority, and medical prescriptions. The narrative contained within this largely chronological collection is not necessarily a progressive one from quackery to medical and scientific enlightenment; the situation was more nuanced than selective quotation from sensational examples has implied in the past. This collection, edited and with a new introduction by Ruth Robbins, illuminates the complexity and shifting grounds of opinion in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by bringing back into print a broad selection of texts offering medical advice to women, and will be of interest to all scholars and students working in gender and cultural studies, and particularly to historians and sociologists of medicine. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aRobbins, Ruth,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/medical-advice-for-women/volumes/medical-advice-for-women-1830-1915-2 aBook02195nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450065002152600034002803000023003145000033003375201131003705380036015016500014015376500030015516500031015816500024016126500022016366500029016587000028016878560133017159750009018489780415403351UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154033518 a10.4324/9780415403351 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMedical Advice for Women 1830 - 1915h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMedical Advice for Women is a new five-volume collection from Routledge and Edition Synapse covering professional, scientific, and medical opinion, in addition to the popular guides aimed at the female reader, between the years 1830 - 1915. Medical literature from this period provides a fascinating insight into the interrelations between social proscriptions, often validated by appeals to religious authority, and medical prescriptions. The narrative contained within this largely chronological collection is not necessarily a progressive one from quackery to medical and scientific enlightenment; the situation was more nuanced than selective quotation from sensational examples has implied in the past. This collection, edited and with a new introduction by Ruth Robbins, illuminates the complexity and shifting grounds of opinion in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by bringing back into print a broad selection of texts offering medical advice to women, and will be of interest to all scholars and students working in gender and cultural studies, and particularly to historians and sociologists of medicine. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aRobbins, Ruth,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/medical-advice-for-women/volumes/medical-advice-for-women-1830-1915-3 aBook02195nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450065002152600034002803000023003145000033003375201131003705380036015016500014015376500030015516500031015816500024016126500022016366500029016587000028016878560133017159750009018489780415403368UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154033688 a10.4324/9780415403368 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMedical Advice for Women 1830 - 1915h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMedical Advice for Women is a new five-volume collection from Routledge and Edition Synapse covering professional, scientific, and medical opinion, in addition to the popular guides aimed at the female reader, between the years 1830 - 1915. Medical literature from this period provides a fascinating insight into the interrelations between social proscriptions, often validated by appeals to religious authority, and medical prescriptions. The narrative contained within this largely chronological collection is not necessarily a progressive one from quackery to medical and scientific enlightenment; the situation was more nuanced than selective quotation from sensational examples has implied in the past. This collection, edited and with a new introduction by Ruth Robbins, illuminates the complexity and shifting grounds of opinion in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries by bringing back into print a broad selection of texts offering medical advice to women, and will be of interest to all scholars and students working in gender and cultural studies, and particularly to historians and sociologists of medicine. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aRobbins, Ruth,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/medical-advice-for-women/volumes/medical-advice-for-women-1830-1915-4 aBook01293nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450063002152600034002783000023003125000033003355200262003685380036006306500014006666500030006806500031007106500024007416500022007656500029007877000033008168560097008499750009009469781848930537UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97818489305378 a10.4324/9781848930537 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMemoirs of Women Writers, Part IIIh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMary Hays was a radical feminist whose writings brought her to the attention of her contemporaries William Blake, Thomas Paine, Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin. Her Female Biography is an ambitious and acclaimed work, covering the lives of 294 women. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aWalker, Gina Luria,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/memoirs-of-women-writers-part-iii aBook01316nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450053002152600034002683000023003025000033003255200262003585380036006206500014006566500030006706500031007006500024007316500022007556500029007777000033008068560130008399750009009699781138755208UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387552088 a10.4324/9781138755208 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMemoirs of Women Writersh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMary Hays was a radical feminist whose writings brought her to the attention of her contemporaries William Blake, Thomas Paine, Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin. Her Female Biography is an ambitious and acclaimed work, covering the lives of 294 women. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aWalker, Gina Luria,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/memoirs-of-women-writers-part-iii/volumes/memoirs-of-women-writers aBook01318nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450053002152600034002683000023003025000033003255200262003585380036006206500014006566500030006706500031007006500024007316500022007556500029007777000033008068560132008399750009009719781138755215UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387552158 a10.4324/9781138755215 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMemoirs of Women Writersh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMary Hays was a radical feminist whose writings brought her to the attention of her contemporaries William Blake, Thomas Paine, Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin. Her Female Biography is an ambitious and acclaimed work, covering the lives of 294 women. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aWalker, Gina Luria,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/memoirs-of-women-writers-part-iii/volumes/memoirs-of-women-writers-1 aBook01318nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450053002152600034002683000023003025000033003255200262003585380036006206500014006566500030006706500031007006500024007316500022007556500029007777000033008068560132008399750009009719781138755192UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387551928 a10.4324/9781138755192 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMemoirs of Women Writersh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aMary Hays was a radical feminist whose writings brought her to the attention of her contemporaries William Blake, Thomas Paine, Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin. Her Female Biography is an ambitious and acclaimed work, covering the lives of 294 women. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aWalker, Gina Luria,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/memoirs-of-women-writers-part-iii/volumes/memoirs-of-women-writers-2 aBook01669nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450057002152600034002723000023003065000033003295200641003625380036010036500014010396500030010536500031010836500024011146500022011386500029011607000042011898560091012319750009013229781851966431UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97818519664318 a10.4324/9781851966431 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aNew Woman Fiction, 1881-1899h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe late nineteenth century saw the emergence of New Woman fiction, a genre of writing which sought to challenge traditional Victorian conceptions of the role of women and promote their independence, education and political participation. This collection brings together important examples of New Woman fiction, each of which helped to crystallise the idea of the New Woman - as an educated, politically aware and independent individual - during the early years of the suffragette movement. The book will be of interest to students of the suffragette movement, as well as to those interested in the history of feminism more generally. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aOulton, Carolyn W. de la L.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/new-woman-fiction-1881-1899 aBook01686nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450067002152600034002823000023003165000033003395200641003725380036010136500014010496500030010636500031010936500024011246500022011486500029011707000042011998560098012419750009013399781851966417UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97818519664178 a10.4324/9781851966417 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aNew Woman Fiction, 1881 - 1899, Part Ih[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe late nineteenth century saw the emergence of New Woman fiction, a genre of writing which sought to challenge traditional Victorian conceptions of the role of women and promote their independence, education and political participation. This collection brings together important examples of New Woman fiction, each of which helped to crystallise the idea of the New Woman - as an educated, politically aware and independent individual - during the early years of the suffragette movement. The book will be of interest to students of the suffragette movement, as well as to those interested in the history of feminism more generally. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aOulton, Carolyn W. de la L.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/new-woman-fiction-1881-1899-part-i aBook01717nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450068002152600034002833000023003175000033003405200641003735380036010146500014010506500030010646500031010946500024011256500022011496500029011717000028012008560142012289750009013709781138755512UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387555128 a10.4324/9781138755512 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aJessie Fothergill, Kith and Kin (1881).h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe late nineteenth century saw the emergence of New Woman fiction, a genre of writing which sought to challenge traditional Victorian conceptions of the role of women and promote their independence, education and political participation. This collection brings together important examples of New Woman fiction, each of which helped to crystallise the idea of the New Woman - as an educated, politically aware and independent individual - during the early years of the suffragette movement. The book will be of interest to students of the suffragette movement, as well as to those interested in the history of feminism more generally. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aAyres, Brenda,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/new-woman-fiction-1881-1899-part-i/volumes/jessie-fothergill-kith-and-kin-1881 aBook01720nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450067002152600034002823000023003165000033003395200641003725380036010136500014010496500030010636500031010936500024011246500022011486500029011707000033011998560141012329750009013739781138755536UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387555368 a10.4324/9781138755536 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMona Caird, The Wing of Azrael (1889).h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe late nineteenth century saw the emergence of New Woman fiction, a genre of writing which sought to challenge traditional Victorian conceptions of the role of women and promote their independence, education and political participation. This collection brings together important examples of New Woman fiction, each of which helped to crystallise the idea of the New Woman - as an educated, politically aware and independent individual - during the early years of the suffragette movement. The book will be of interest to students of the suffragette movement, as well as to those interested in the history of feminism more generally. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aWarwick, Alexandra,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/new-woman-fiction-1881-1899-part-i/volumes/mona-caird-the-wing-of-azrael-1889 aBook01697nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450059002152600034002743000023003085000033003315200641003645380036010056500014010416500030010556500031010856500024011166500022011406500029011627000026011918560133012179750009013509781138755529UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387555298 a10.4324/9781138755529 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aVernon Lee, Miss Brown (1884).h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe late nineteenth century saw the emergence of New Woman fiction, a genre of writing which sought to challenge traditional Victorian conceptions of the role of women and promote their independence, education and political participation. This collection brings together important examples of New Woman fiction, each of which helped to crystallise the idea of the New Woman - as an educated, politically aware and independent individual - during the early years of the suffragette movement. The book will be of interest to students of the suffragette movement, as well as to those interested in the history of feminism more generally. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aYuen, Karen,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/new-woman-fiction-1881-1899-part-i/volumes/vernon-lee-miss-brown-1884 aBook01686nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450066002152600034002813000023003155000033003385200641003715380036010126500014010486500030010626500031010926500024011236500022011476500029011697000042011988560099012409750009013399781851966424UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97818519664248 a10.4324/9781851966424 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aNew Woman Fiction, 1881-1899, Part IIh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe late nineteenth century saw the emergence of New Woman fiction, a genre of writing which sought to challenge traditional Victorian conceptions of the role of women and promote their independence, education and political participation. This collection brings together important examples of New Woman fiction, each of which helped to crystallise the idea of the New Woman - as an educated, politically aware and independent individual - during the early years of the suffragette movement. The book will be of interest to students of the suffragette movement, as well as to those interested in the history of feminism more generally. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aOulton, Carolyn W. de la L.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/new-woman-fiction-1881-1899-part-ii aBook01870nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450147002152600034003623000023003965000033004195200641004525380036010936500014011296500030011436500031011736500024012046500022012286500029012507000029012798560215013089750009015239781138755550UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387555508 a10.4324/9781138755550 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aAnnie E. Holdsworth, The Years that the Locust Hath Eaten (1895); Annie E. Holdsworth, Joanna Traill, Spinster (1894).h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe late nineteenth century saw the emergence of New Woman fiction, a genre of writing which sought to challenge traditional Victorian conceptions of the role of women and promote their independence, education and political participation. This collection brings together important examples of New Woman fiction, each of which helped to crystallise the idea of the New Woman - as an educated, politically aware and independent individual - during the early years of the suffragette movement. The book will be of interest to students of the suffragette movement, as well as to those interested in the history of feminism more generally. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aSchatz, SueAnn,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/new-woman-fiction-1881-1899-part-ii/volumes/annie-e-holdsworth-the-years-that-the-locust-hath-eaten-1895-annie-e-holdsworth-joanna-traill-spinster-1894 aBook01784nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450100002152600034003153000023003495000033003725200641004055380036010466500014010826500030010966500031011266500024011576500022011816500029012037000033012328560172012659750009014379781138755543UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387555438 a10.4324/9781138755543 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aC. L. Pirkis, The Experiences of Loveday Brooke, Lady Detective (1894).h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe late nineteenth century saw the emergence of New Woman fiction, a genre of writing which sought to challenge traditional Victorian conceptions of the role of women and promote their independence, education and political participation. This collection brings together important examples of New Woman fiction, each of which helped to crystallise the idea of the New Woman - as an educated, politically aware and independent individual - during the early years of the suffragette movement. The book will be of interest to students of the suffragette movement, as well as to those interested in the history of feminism more generally. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aGavin, Adrienne E.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/new-woman-fiction-1881-1899-part-ii/volumes/c-l-pirkis-the-experiences-of-loveday-brooke-lady-detective-1894 aBook01798nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450108002152600034003233000023003575000033003805200641004135380036010546500014010906500030011046500031011346500024011656500022011896500029012117000034012408560177012749750009014519781138755567UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387555678 a10.4324/9781138755567 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aNetta Syrett, Nobody's Fault (1896), Netta Syrett, The Sheltering Tree (1939),.h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe late nineteenth century saw the emergence of New Woman fiction, a genre of writing which sought to challenge traditional Victorian conceptions of the role of women and promote their independence, education and political participation. This collection brings together important examples of New Woman fiction, each of which helped to crystallise the idea of the New Woman - as an educated, politically aware and independent individual - during the early years of the suffragette movement. The book will be of interest to students of the suffragette movement, as well as to those interested in the history of feminism more generally. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aCregan-Reid, Vybarr,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/new-woman-fiction-1881-1899-part-ii/volumes/netta-syrett-nobodys-fault-1896-netta-syrett-the-sheltering-tree-1939 aBook01718nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450069002152600034002843000023003185000033003415200641003745380036010156500014010516500030010656500031010956500024011266500022011506500029011727000034012018560136012359750009013719781138755581UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387555818 a10.4324/9781138755581 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aGeorge Egerton, The Wheel of God (1898).h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe late nineteenth century saw the emergence of New Woman fiction, a genre of writing which sought to challenge traditional Victorian conceptions of the role of women and promote their independence, education and political participation. This collection brings together important examples of New Woman fiction, each of which helped to crystallise the idea of the New Woman - as an educated, politically aware and independent individual - during the early years of the suffragette movement. The book will be of interest to students of the suffragette movement, as well as to those interested in the history of feminism more generally. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMarch-Russell, Paul,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/new-woman-fiction-1881-1899/volumes/george-egerton-the-wheel-of-god-1898 aBook01722nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450067002152600034002823000023003165000033003395200641003725380036010136500014010496500030010636500031010936500024011246500022011486500029011707000042011998560134012419750009013759781138755598UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387555988 a10.4324/9781138755598 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aMary Cholmondeley, Red Pottage (1899).h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe late nineteenth century saw the emergence of New Woman fiction, a genre of writing which sought to challenge traditional Victorian conceptions of the role of women and promote their independence, education and political participation. This collection brings together important examples of New Woman fiction, each of which helped to crystallise the idea of the New Woman - as an educated, politically aware and independent individual - during the early years of the suffragette movement. The book will be of interest to students of the suffragette movement, as well as to those interested in the history of feminism more generally. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aOulton, Carolyn W. de la L.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/new-woman-fiction-1881-1899/volumes/mary-cholmondeley-red-pottage-1899 aBook01689nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450058002152600034002733000023003075000033003305200641003635380036010046500014010406500030010546500031010846500024011156500022011396500029011617000027011908560125012179750009013429781138755574UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387555748 a10.4324/9781138755574 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aOuida, The Massarenes (1897).h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe late nineteenth century saw the emergence of New Woman fiction, a genre of writing which sought to challenge traditional Victorian conceptions of the role of women and promote their independence, education and political participation. This collection brings together important examples of New Woman fiction, each of which helped to crystallise the idea of the New Woman - as an educated, politically aware and independent individual - during the early years of the suffragette movement. The book will be of interest to students of the suffragette movement, as well as to those interested in the history of feminism more generally. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aKing, Andrew,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/new-woman-fiction-1881-1899/volumes/ouida-the-massarenes-1897 aBook02471nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450084002152600034002993000023003335000033003565201358003895380036017476500014017836500030017976500031018276500024018586500022018826500029019047000030019337000032019638560117019959750009021129780415376396UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153763968 a10.4324/9780415376396 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aNineteenth-Century British Women's Education, 1840-1900h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis new six-volume collection from Routledge and Edition Synapse brings together key documents from the Victorian feminist campaign to establish and improve girls' and women's education. The set is divided into two sections, both of which incorporate materials that argue for the improvement of girls' and women's education as well as arguments made against education for girls and women. The first section focuses on the debate surrounding the quality of women's education and the question of access to higher education for women. This section also brings together documents from the feminist campaign with writing from the established press on the question of women's higher education, and writings from the Social Sciences Association where many education reformers aired their views. The second section concentrates on the strengths and successes of Victorian women as educators, and highlights some of the most influential women in the field of education during this era. Drawing widely on articles from the feminist and established press, government papers, newspapers, professional and association journals, as well as memoirs, addresses, pamphlets, and reviews, this essential collection gives researchers excellent and comprehensive access to nineteenth-century debates on improving girls' and women's education, and women's work as educators. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHamilton, Susan,eeditor.1 aSchroeder, Janice,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/nineteenth-century-british-womens-education-1840-1900 aBook02529nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450081002152600034002963000023003305000033003535201358003865380036017446500014017806500030017946500031018246500024018556500022018796500029019017000030019307000032019608560178019929750009021709780415446570UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154465708 a10.4324/9780415446570 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aEducation of Working Women and of Middle Class Girlsh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis new six-volume collection from Routledge and Edition Synapse brings together key documents from the Victorian feminist campaign to establish and improve girls' and women's education. The set is divided into two sections, both of which incorporate materials that argue for the improvement of girls' and women's education as well as arguments made against education for girls and women. The first section focuses on the debate surrounding the quality of women's education and the question of access to higher education for women. This section also brings together documents from the feminist campaign with writing from the established press on the question of women's higher education, and writings from the Social Sciences Association where many education reformers aired their views. The second section concentrates on the strengths and successes of Victorian women as educators, and highlights some of the most influential women in the field of education during this era. Drawing widely on articles from the feminist and established press, government papers, newspapers, professional and association journals, as well as memoirs, addresses, pamphlets, and reviews, this essential collection gives researchers excellent and comprehensive access to nineteenth-century debates on improving girls' and women's education, and women's work as educators. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHamilton, Susan,eeditor.1 aSchroeder, Janice,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/nineteenth-century-british-womens-education-1840-1900/volumes/education-of-working-women-and-of-middle-class-girls aBook02517nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450075002152600034002903000023003245000033003475201358003805380036017386500014017746500030017886500031018186500024018496500022018736500029018957000030019247000032019548560172019869750009021589780415446556UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154465568 a10.4324/9780415446556 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aEmily Davies and the Higher Education of Womenh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis new six-volume collection from Routledge and Edition Synapse brings together key documents from the Victorian feminist campaign to establish and improve girls' and women's education. The set is divided into two sections, both of which incorporate materials that argue for the improvement of girls' and women's education as well as arguments made against education for girls and women. The first section focuses on the debate surrounding the quality of women's education and the question of access to higher education for women. This section also brings together documents from the feminist campaign with writing from the established press on the question of women's higher education, and writings from the Social Sciences Association where many education reformers aired their views. The second section concentrates on the strengths and successes of Victorian women as educators, and highlights some of the most influential women in the field of education during this era. Drawing widely on articles from the feminist and established press, government papers, newspapers, professional and association journals, as well as memoirs, addresses, pamphlets, and reviews, this essential collection gives researchers excellent and comprehensive access to nineteenth-century debates on improving girls' and women's education, and women's work as educators. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHamilton, Susan,eeditor.1 aSchroeder, Janice,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/nineteenth-century-british-womens-education-1840-1900/volumes/emily-davies-and-the-higher-education-of-women aBook02508nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450086002152600034003013000023003355000033003585201358003915380036017496500014017856500030017996500031018296500024018606500022018846500029019067000030019357000032019658560152019979750009021499780415446563UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154465638 a10.4324/9780415446563 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aGirl's and Women's Educationh[electronic resource] :bArguments and Experiences. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis new six-volume collection from Routledge and Edition Synapse brings together key documents from the Victorian feminist campaign to establish and improve girls' and women's education. The set is divided into two sections, both of which incorporate materials that argue for the improvement of girls' and women's education as well as arguments made against education for girls and women. The first section focuses on the debate surrounding the quality of women's education and the question of access to higher education for women. This section also brings together documents from the feminist campaign with writing from the established press on the question of women's higher education, and writings from the Social Sciences Association where many education reformers aired their views. The second section concentrates on the strengths and successes of Victorian women as educators, and highlights some of the most influential women in the field of education during this era. Drawing widely on articles from the feminist and established press, government papers, newspapers, professional and association journals, as well as memoirs, addresses, pamphlets, and reviews, this essential collection gives researchers excellent and comprehensive access to nineteenth-century debates on improving girls' and women's education, and women's work as educators. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHamilton, Susan,eeditor.1 aSchroeder, Janice,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/nineteenth-century-british-womens-education-1840-1900/volumes/girls-and-womens-education aBook02477nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450055002152600034002703000023003045000033003275201358003605380036017186500014017546500030017686500031017986500024018296500022018536500029018757000030019047000032019348560152019669750009021189780415446587UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154465878 a10.4324/9780415446587 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aHigher Education for Womenh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis new six-volume collection from Routledge and Edition Synapse brings together key documents from the Victorian feminist campaign to establish and improve girls' and women's education. The set is divided into two sections, both of which incorporate materials that argue for the improvement of girls' and women's education as well as arguments made against education for girls and women. The first section focuses on the debate surrounding the quality of women's education and the question of access to higher education for women. This section also brings together documents from the feminist campaign with writing from the established press on the question of women's higher education, and writings from the Social Sciences Association where many education reformers aired their views. The second section concentrates on the strengths and successes of Victorian women as educators, and highlights some of the most influential women in the field of education during this era. Drawing widely on articles from the feminist and established press, government papers, newspapers, professional and association journals, as well as memoirs, addresses, pamphlets, and reviews, this essential collection gives researchers excellent and comprehensive access to nineteenth-century debates on improving girls' and women's education, and women's work as educators. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHamilton, Susan,eeditor.1 aSchroeder, Janice,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/nineteenth-century-british-womens-education-1840-1900/volumes/higher-education-for-women aBook02529nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450115002152600034003303000023003645000033003875201358004205380036017786500014018146500030018286500031018586500024018896500022019136500029019357000030019647000032019948560144020269750009021709780415446594UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154465948 a10.4324/9780415446594 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen as Educatorsh[electronic resource] :bDorothea Beale, Frances Mary Buss, Maria Grey and Emily Shirreff. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis new six-volume collection from Routledge and Edition Synapse brings together key documents from the Victorian feminist campaign to establish and improve girls' and women's education. The set is divided into two sections, both of which incorporate materials that argue for the improvement of girls' and women's education as well as arguments made against education for girls and women. The first section focuses on the debate surrounding the quality of women's education and the question of access to higher education for women. This section also brings together documents from the feminist campaign with writing from the established press on the question of women's higher education, and writings from the Social Sciences Association where many education reformers aired their views. The second section concentrates on the strengths and successes of Victorian women as educators, and highlights some of the most influential women in the field of education during this era. Drawing widely on articles from the feminist and established press, government papers, newspapers, professional and association journals, as well as memoirs, addresses, pamphlets, and reviews, this essential collection gives researchers excellent and comprehensive access to nineteenth-century debates on improving girls' and women's education, and women's work as educators. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHamilton, Susan,eeditor.1 aSchroeder, Janice,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/nineteenth-century-british-womens-education-1840-1900/volumes/women-as-educators aBook02492nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450076002152600034002913000023003255000033003485201358003815380036017396500014017756500030017896500031018196500024018506500022018746500029018967000030019257000032019558560146019879750009021339780415446600UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154466008 a10.4324/9780415446600 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen as Educatorsh[electronic resource] :bArguments and Experiences. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis new six-volume collection from Routledge and Edition Synapse brings together key documents from the Victorian feminist campaign to establish and improve girls' and women's education. The set is divided into two sections, both of which incorporate materials that argue for the improvement of girls' and women's education as well as arguments made against education for girls and women. The first section focuses on the debate surrounding the quality of women's education and the question of access to higher education for women. This section also brings together documents from the feminist campaign with writing from the established press on the question of women's higher education, and writings from the Social Sciences Association where many education reformers aired their views. The second section concentrates on the strengths and successes of Victorian women as educators, and highlights some of the most influential women in the field of education during this era. Drawing widely on articles from the feminist and established press, government papers, newspapers, professional and association journals, as well as memoirs, addresses, pamphlets, and reviews, this essential collection gives researchers excellent and comprehensive access to nineteenth-century debates on improving girls' and women's education, and women's work as educators. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHamilton, Susan,eeditor.1 aSchroeder, Janice,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/nineteenth-century-british-womens-education-1840-1900/volumes/women-as-educators-1 aBook02032nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450063002152600034002783000023003125000033003355200961003685380036013296500014013656500030013796500031014096500024014406500022014646500029014867000028015157000033015438560097015769750009016739780415214100UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804152141008 a10.4324/9780415214100 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aSex, Social Purity and Sarah Grandh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aSarah Grand was one of the most prominent New Women of the 1890s and a notable social purity feminist and suffragist. This collection offers important insights into the full range of her journalistic output and lesser-known fictional writings. It also makes available biographical and autobiographical material, and previously unpublished manuscript sources. The first volume reproduces Grand's articles and the contemporary critical reception of her work. The letters in volume two, written mostly in the 1920s and 1930s, shed light on Grand's genesis as a writer and her interaction with 1890s artistic and feminist circles. The third and fourth volumes contain a selection of short stories from three collections published at and after the turn of the century. These comment on some of the explosive issues of that time: feminism, decadence, eugenics, class, race and war. They also reflect Grand's exploration of the interplay between gender and genre. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHeilmann, Ann,eeditor.1 aForward, Stephanie,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/sex-social-purity-and-sarah-grand aBook02058nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450077002152600034002923000023003265000033003495200961003825380036013436500014013796500030013936500031014236500024014546500022014786500029015007000028015298560154015579750009017119780415214117UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804152141178 a10.4324/9780415214117 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aJournalistic Writings and Contemporary Receptionh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aSarah Grand was one of the most prominent New Women of the 1890s and a notable social purity feminist and suffragist. This collection offers important insights into the full range of her journalistic output and lesser-known fictional writings. It also makes available biographical and autobiographical material, and previously unpublished manuscript sources. The first volume reproduces Grand's articles and the contemporary critical reception of her work. The letters in volume two, written mostly in the 1920s and 1930s, shed light on Grand's genesis as a writer and her interaction with 1890s artistic and feminist circles. The third and fourth volumes contain a selection of short stories from three collections published at and after the turn of the century. These comment on some of the explosive issues of that time: feminism, decadence, eugenics, class, race and war. They also reflect Grand's exploration of the interplay between gender and genre. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHeilmann, Ann,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/sex-social-purity-and-sarah-grand/volumes/journalistic-writings-and-contemporary-reception aBook01999nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450045002152600034002603000023002945000033003175200961003505380036013116500014013476500030013616500031013916500024014226500022014466500029014687000033014978560122015309750009016529780415214124UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804152141248 a10.4324/9780415214124 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aSelected Lettersh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aSarah Grand was one of the most prominent New Women of the 1890s and a notable social purity feminist and suffragist. This collection offers important insights into the full range of her journalistic output and lesser-known fictional writings. It also makes available biographical and autobiographical material, and previously unpublished manuscript sources. The first volume reproduces Grand's articles and the contemporary critical reception of her work. The letters in volume two, written mostly in the 1920s and 1930s, shed light on Grand's genesis as a writer and her interaction with 1890s artistic and feminist circles. The third and fourth volumes contain a selection of short stories from three collections published at and after the turn of the century. These comment on some of the explosive issues of that time: feminism, decadence, eugenics, class, race and war. They also reflect Grand's exploration of the interplay between gender and genre. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aForward, Stephanie,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/sex-social-purity-and-sarah-grand/volumes/selected-letters aBook02019nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450059002152600034002743000023003085000033003315200961003645380036013256500014013616500030013756500031014056500024014366500022014606500029014827000028015118560133015399750009016729780415214131UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804152141318 a10.4324/9780415214131 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aSelected Shorter Writings (1).h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aSarah Grand was one of the most prominent New Women of the 1890s and a notable social purity feminist and suffragist. This collection offers important insights into the full range of her journalistic output and lesser-known fictional writings. It also makes available biographical and autobiographical material, and previously unpublished manuscript sources. The first volume reproduces Grand's articles and the contemporary critical reception of her work. The letters in volume two, written mostly in the 1920s and 1930s, shed light on Grand's genesis as a writer and her interaction with 1890s artistic and feminist circles. The third and fourth volumes contain a selection of short stories from three collections published at and after the turn of the century. These comment on some of the explosive issues of that time: feminism, decadence, eugenics, class, race and war. They also reflect Grand's exploration of the interplay between gender and genre. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHeilmann, Ann,eeditor.04uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/sex-social-purity-and-sarah-grand/volumes/selected-shorter-writings-1 aBook02019nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450059002152600034002743000023003085000033003315200961003645380036013256500014013616500030013756500031014056500024014366500022014606500029014827000028015118560133015399750009016729780415238717UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804152387178 a10.4324/9780415238717 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aSelected Shorter Writings (2).h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aSarah Grand was one of the most prominent New Women of the 1890s and a notable social purity feminist and suffragist. This collection offers important insights into the full range of her journalistic output and lesser-known fictional writings. It also makes available biographical and autobiographical material, and previously unpublished manuscript sources. The first volume reproduces Grand's articles and the contemporary critical reception of her work. The letters in volume two, written mostly in the 1920s and 1930s, shed light on Grand's genesis as a writer and her interaction with 1890s artistic and feminist circles. The third and fourth volumes contain a selection of short stories from three collections published at and after the turn of the century. These comment on some of the explosive issues of that time: feminism, decadence, eugenics, class, race and war. They also reflect Grand's exploration of the interplay between gender and genre. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHeilmann, Ann,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/sex-social-purity-and-sarah-grand/volumes/selected-shorter-writings-2 aBook01641nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450071002152600034002863000023003205000033003435200592003765380036009686500014010046500030010186500031010486500024010796500022011036500029011257000034011548560106011889750009012949781851968046UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97818519680468 a10.4324/9781851968046 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aThe Collected Letters of Harriet Martineauh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis five-volume set brings together the surviving letters penned by Harriet Martineau, the nineteenth-century writer and women's rights advocate. Throughout her fifty-year career, Harriet Martineau's prolific literary output was matched only by her exchanges with a range of high-profile British, American and European correspondents. This set focuses on the letters written by Martineau, contextualising the correspondence through annotation of the highest standard. This book is a unique and highly valuable resource for students of, and others interested in, the history of feminism. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aLogan, Deborah Anna,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-collected-letters-of-harriet-martineau aBook01642nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450046002152600034002613000023002955000033003185200592003515380036009436500014009796500030009936500031010236500024010546500022010786500029011007000034011298560132011639750009012959781138758094UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387580948 a10.4324/9781138758094 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aLetters 1819-1837h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis five-volume set brings together the surviving letters penned by Harriet Martineau, the nineteenth-century writer and women's rights advocate. Throughout her fifty-year career, Harriet Martineau's prolific literary output was matched only by her exchanges with a range of high-profile British, American and European correspondents. This set focuses on the letters written by Martineau, contextualising the correspondence through annotation of the highest standard. This book is a unique and highly valuable resource for students of, and others interested in, the history of feminism. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aLogan, Deborah Anna,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-collected-letters-of-harriet-martineau/volumes/letters-1819-1837 aBook01642nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450046002152600034002613000023002955000033003185200592003515380036009436500014009796500030009936500031010236500024010546500022010786500029011007000034011298560132011639750009012959781138758100UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387581008 a10.4324/9781138758100 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aLetters 1845-1855h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis five-volume set brings together the surviving letters penned by Harriet Martineau, the nineteenth-century writer and women's rights advocate. Throughout her fifty-year career, Harriet Martineau's prolific literary output was matched only by her exchanges with a range of high-profile British, American and European correspondents. This set focuses on the letters written by Martineau, contextualising the correspondence through annotation of the highest standard. This book is a unique and highly valuable resource for students of, and others interested in, the history of feminism. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aLogan, Deborah Anna,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-collected-letters-of-harriet-martineau/volumes/letters-1845-1855 aBook01642nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450046002152600034002613000023002955000033003185200592003515380036009436500014009796500030009936500031010236500024010546500022010786500029011007000034011298560132011639750009012959781138758117UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387581178 a10.4324/9781138758117 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aLetters 1856-1862h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis five-volume set brings together the surviving letters penned by Harriet Martineau, the nineteenth-century writer and women's rights advocate. Throughout her fifty-year career, Harriet Martineau's prolific literary output was matched only by her exchanges with a range of high-profile British, American and European correspondents. This set focuses on the letters written by Martineau, contextualising the correspondence through annotation of the highest standard. This book is a unique and highly valuable resource for students of, and others interested in, the history of feminism. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aLogan, Deborah Anna,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-collected-letters-of-harriet-martineau/volumes/letters-1856-1862 aBook01642nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450046002152600034002613000023002955000033003185200592003515380036009436500014009796500030009936500031010236500024010546500022010786500029011007000034011298560132011639750009012959781138758124UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387581248 a10.4324/9781138758124 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aLetters 1863-1876h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis five-volume set brings together the surviving letters penned by Harriet Martineau, the nineteenth-century writer and women's rights advocate. Throughout her fifty-year career, Harriet Martineau's prolific literary output was matched only by her exchanges with a range of high-profile British, American and European correspondents. This set focuses on the letters written by Martineau, contextualising the correspondence through annotation of the highest standard. This book is a unique and highly valuable resource for students of, and others interested in, the history of feminism. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aLogan, Deborah Anna,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-collected-letters-of-harriet-martineau/volumes/letters-1863-1876 aBook01608nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000028002152450104002432600034003473000023003815000033004045200538004375380036009756500014010116500030010256500031010556500024010866500022011106500029011328560100011619750009012619780415179430UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804151794308 a10.4324/9780415179430 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aHeilmann, Ann,eauthor.10aThe Late-Victorian Marriage Questionh[electronic resource] :bA Collection of Key New Woman Texts. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis anthology contextualizes key feminist texts and ideas by linking them with the transformation of public opinion brought about by the late Victorian debate on marriage, motherhood and women's right to an independent life. Included are Mona Caird's controversial The Morality of Marriage; debates between feminists, traditionalists and anti-feminists on marriage, divorce and the New Woman, and selected reading from New Woman fiction, both feminist and anti-feminist, which reproduces the media debate on morality in literature. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-late-victorian-marriage-question aBook01581nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450049002152600034002643000023002985000033003215200537003545380036008916500014009276500030009416500031009716500024010026500022010266500029010487000028010778560129011059750009012349780415194242UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804151942428 a10.4324/9780415194242 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aLiterary Degeneratesh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis anthology contextualizes key feminist texts and ideas by linking them with the transformation of public opinion brought about by the late Victorian debate on marriage, motherhood and women's right to an independent life. Included are Mona Caird's controversial The Morality of Marriage; debates between feminists, traditionalists and anti-feminists on marriage, divorce and the New Woman, and selected reading from New Woman fiction, both feminist and anti-feminist, which reproduces the media debate on morality in literature. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHeilmann, Ann,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-late-victorian-marriage-question/volumes/literary-degenerates aBook01587nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001961000028002152450052002432600034002953000023003295000033003525200537003855380036009226500014009586500030009726500031010026500024010336500022010576500029010798560132011089750009012409780415194204UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804151942048 a10.4324/9780415194204 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH673691 aHeilmann, Ann,eauthor.10aMarriage and Motherhoodh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis anthology contextualizes key feminist texts and ideas by linking them with the transformation of public opinion brought about by the late Victorian debate on marriage, motherhood and women's right to an independent life. Included are Mona Caird's controversial The Morality of Marriage; debates between feminists, traditionalists and anti-feminists on marriage, divorce and the New Woman, and selected reading from New Woman fiction, both feminist and anti-feminist, which reproduces the media debate on morality in literature. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-late-victorian-marriage-question/volumes/marriage-and-motherhood aBook01614nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450083002152600034002983000023003325000033003555200537003885380036009256500014009616500030009756500031010056500024010366500022010606500029010827000028011118560128011399750009012679780415194228UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804151942288 a10.4324/9780415194228 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aNew Woman Fiction (1)h[electronic resource] :bMarriage, Motherhood and Work. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis anthology contextualizes key feminist texts and ideas by linking them with the transformation of public opinion brought about by the late Victorian debate on marriage, motherhood and women's right to an independent life. Included are Mona Caird's controversial The Morality of Marriage; debates between feminists, traditionalists and anti-feminists on marriage, divorce and the New Woman, and selected reading from New Woman fiction, both feminist and anti-feminist, which reproduces the media debate on morality in literature. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHeilmann, Ann,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-late-victorian-marriage-question/volumes/new-woman-fiction-1 aBook01605nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450074002152600034002893000023003235000033003465200537003795380036009166500014009526500030009666500031009966500024010276500022010516500029010737000028011028560128011309750009012589780415194235UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804151942358 a10.4324/9780415194235 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aNew Woman Fiction (2)h[electronic resource] :bGender and Sexuality. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis anthology contextualizes key feminist texts and ideas by linking them with the transformation of public opinion brought about by the late Victorian debate on marriage, motherhood and women's right to an independent life. Included are Mona Caird's controversial The Morality of Marriage; debates between feminists, traditionalists and anti-feminists on marriage, divorce and the New Woman, and selected reading from New Woman fiction, both feminist and anti-feminist, which reproduces the media debate on morality in literature. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHeilmann, Ann,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-late-victorian-marriage-question/volumes/new-woman-fiction-2 aBook01615nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450066002152600034002813000023003155000033003385200537003715380036009086500014009446500030009586500031009886500024010196500022010436500029010657000028010948560146011229750009012689780415194211UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804151942118 a10.4324/9780415194211 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe New Woman and Female Independenceh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis anthology contextualizes key feminist texts and ideas by linking them with the transformation of public opinion brought about by the late Victorian debate on marriage, motherhood and women's right to an independent life. Included are Mona Caird's controversial The Morality of Marriage; debates between feminists, traditionalists and anti-feminists on marriage, divorce and the New Woman, and selected reading from New Woman fiction, both feminist and anti-feminist, which reproduces the media debate on morality in literature. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aHeilmann, Ann,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-late-victorian-marriage-question/volumes/the-new-woman-and-female-independence aBook01559nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450076002152600034002913000023003255000033003485200535003815380036009166500014009526500030009666500031009966500024010276500022010516500029010737000027011028560083011299750009012129781848932272UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97818489322728 a10.4324/9781848932272 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Women Aesthetesh[electronic resource] :bBitish Writers 1870-1900. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe aesthetic movement dominated the closing decades of the nineteenth century. It was significant for the role women played in it at a time when there were growing opportunities for them, both artistically and professionally. The material in this collection provides a representative selection of essays, fiction, poetry and drama by female authors, including Violet Fane, Agnes Garrett and Rhoda Broughton. The collection provides a useful resource for students of nineteenth century art, literature, gender studies and history. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aSpirit, Jane,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-women-aesthetes aBook01587nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450038002152600034002533000023002875000033003105200535003435380036008786500014009146500030009286500031009586500024009896500022010136500029010357000031010647000032010958560101011279750009012289781138763654UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387636548 a10.4324/9781138763654 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900a1870-1880h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe aesthetic movement dominated the closing decades of the nineteenth century. It was significant for the role women played in it at a time when there were growing opportunities for them, both artistically and professionally. The material in this collection provides a representative selection of essays, fiction, poetry and drama by female authors, including Violet Fane, Agnes Garrett and Rhoda Broughton. The collection provides a useful resource for students of nineteenth century art, literature, gender studies and history. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aJoannou, Maroula,eeditor.1 aNicholson, Claire,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-women-aesthetes/volumes/1870-1880 aBook01551nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450044002152600034002593000023002935000033003165200535003495380036008846500014009206500030009346500031009646500024009956500022010196500029010417000027010708560107010979750009012049781138763661UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387636618 a10.4324/9781138763661 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900a1880s and 1890sh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe aesthetic movement dominated the closing decades of the nineteenth century. It was significant for the role women played in it at a time when there were growing opportunities for them, both artistically and professionally. The material in this collection provides a representative selection of essays, fiction, poetry and drama by female authors, including Violet Fane, Agnes Garrett and Rhoda Broughton. The collection provides a useful resource for students of nineteenth century art, literature, gender studies and history. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aSpirit, Jane,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-women-aesthetes/volumes/1880s-and-1890s aBook01557nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450048002152600034002633000023002975000033003205200535003535380036008886500014009246500030009386500031009686500024009996500022010236500029010457000025010748560111010999750009012109781138763678UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387636788 a10.4324/9781138763678 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aYellow Book Writersh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe aesthetic movement dominated the closing decades of the nineteenth century. It was significant for the role women played in it at a time when there were growing opportunities for them, both artistically and professionally. The material in this collection provides a representative selection of essays, fiction, poetry and drama by female authors, including Violet Fane, Agnes Garrett and Rhoda Broughton. The collection provides a useful resource for students of nineteenth century art, literature, gender studies and history. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aAsbee, Sue,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-women-aesthetes/volumes/yellow-book-writers aBook01886nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450061002152600034002763000023003105000033003335200781003665380036011476500014011836500030011976500031012276500024012586500022012826500029013047000026013337000030013597000030013898560096014199750009015159781851960064UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97818519600648 a10.4324/9781851960064 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aThe Works of Mary Wollstonecrafth[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis seven-volume collection brings together the known works of Mary Wollstonecraft, the eighteenth-century philosopher, writer and women's rights advocate. Condemned by her contemporaries for her unconventional lifestyle, Wollstonecraft was later recognised as a founding figure of the feminist movement. She was also an acute observer of the political upheavals of the French revolution and advocated educational reform. Wollstonecraft's writings, which include A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and Thoughts on the Education of Daughters, are recognised as cornerstone texts in the development of feminist thought. This book is therefore a vital reference to the student of feminist history, and will also be of value to any reader interested in the origins of feminism. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aTodd, Janet,eeditor.1 aButler, Marilyn,eeditor.1 aRees-Mogg, Emma,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-works-of-mary-wollstonecraft aBook02019nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450108002152600034003233000023003575000033003805200781004135380036011946500014012306500030012446500031012746500024013056500022013296500029013517000026013807000030014067000030014368560182014669750009016489781138764545UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387645458 a10.4324/9781138764545 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aA Vindication of the Rights of Men, A Vindication of the Rights of Women, Hintsh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis seven-volume collection brings together the known works of Mary Wollstonecraft, the eighteenth-century philosopher, writer and women's rights advocate. Condemned by her contemporaries for her unconventional lifestyle, Wollstonecraft was later recognised as a founding figure of the feminist movement. She was also an acute observer of the political upheavals of the French revolution and advocated educational reform. Wollstonecraft's writings, which include A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and Thoughts on the Education of Daughters, are recognised as cornerstone texts in the development of feminist thought. This book is therefore a vital reference to the student of feminist history, and will also be of value to any reader interested in the origins of feminism. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aTodd, Janet,eeditor.1 aButler, Marilyn,eeditor.1 aRees-Mogg, Emma,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-works-of-mary-wollstonecraft/volumes/a-vindication-of-the-rights-of-men-a-vindication-of-the-rights-of-women-hints aBook02165nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450182002152600034003973000023004315000033004545200781004875380036012686500014013046500030013186500031013486500024013796500022014036500029014257000026014547000030014807000030015108560254015409750009017949781138764552UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387645528 a10.4324/9781138764552 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aAn Historical and Moral View of the French Revolution, Letters to Joseph Johnson, Letters Written in Sweden, Norway and Denmark, Letters to Gilbert Imlayh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis seven-volume collection brings together the known works of Mary Wollstonecraft, the eighteenth-century philosopher, writer and women's rights advocate. Condemned by her contemporaries for her unconventional lifestyle, Wollstonecraft was later recognised as a founding figure of the feminist movement. She was also an acute observer of the political upheavals of the French revolution and advocated educational reform. Wollstonecraft's writings, which include A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and Thoughts on the Education of Daughters, are recognised as cornerstone texts in the development of feminist thought. This book is therefore a vital reference to the student of feminist history, and will also be of value to any reader interested in the origins of feminism. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aTodd, Janet,eeditor.1 aButler, Marilyn,eeditor.1 aRees-Mogg, Emma,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-works-of-mary-wollstonecraft/volumes/an-historical-and-moral-view-of-the-french-revolution-letters-to-joseph-johnson-letters-written-in-sweden-norway-and-denmark-letters-to-gilbert-imlay aBook01935nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450065002152600034002803000023003145000033003375200781003705380036011516500014011876500030012016500031012316500024012626500022012866500029013087000026013377000030013637000030013938560141014239750009015649781138764514UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387645148 a10.4324/9781138764514 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aElements of Morality Young Grandisonh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis seven-volume collection brings together the known works of Mary Wollstonecraft, the eighteenth-century philosopher, writer and women's rights advocate. Condemned by her contemporaries for her unconventional lifestyle, Wollstonecraft was later recognised as a founding figure of the feminist movement. She was also an acute observer of the political upheavals of the French revolution and advocated educational reform. Wollstonecraft's writings, which include A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and Thoughts on the Education of Daughters, are recognised as cornerstone texts in the development of feminist thought. This book is therefore a vital reference to the student of feminist history, and will also be of value to any reader interested in the origins of feminism. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aTodd, Janet,eeditor.1 aButler, Marilyn,eeditor.1 aRees-Mogg, Emma,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-works-of-mary-wollstonecraft/volumes/elements-of-morality-young-grandison aBook01941nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450068002152600034002833000023003175000033003405200781003735380036011546500014011906500030012046500031012346500024012656500022012896500029013117000026013407000030013667000030013968560144014269750009015709781138764521UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387645218 a10.4324/9781138764521 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aOf the Importance of Religious Opinionsh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis seven-volume collection brings together the known works of Mary Wollstonecraft, the eighteenth-century philosopher, writer and women's rights advocate. Condemned by her contemporaries for her unconventional lifestyle, Wollstonecraft was later recognised as a founding figure of the feminist movement. She was also an acute observer of the political upheavals of the French revolution and advocated educational reform. Wollstonecraft's writings, which include A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and Thoughts on the Education of Daughters, are recognised as cornerstone texts in the development of feminist thought. This book is therefore a vital reference to the student of feminist history, and will also be of value to any reader interested in the origins of feminism. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aTodd, Janet,eeditor.1 aButler, Marilyn,eeditor.1 aRees-Mogg, Emma,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-works-of-mary-wollstonecraft/volumes/of-the-importance-of-religious-opinions aBook02025nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450133002152600034003483000023003825000033004055200781004385380036012196500014012556500030012696500031012996500024013306500022013546500029013767000026014057000030014317000030014618560163014919750009016549781138764569UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387645698 a10.4324/9781138764569 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aOn Poetry, Contributions to the Analytical Review 1788-1797h[electronic resource] :bwith index to the Works of Wollstonecraft. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis seven-volume collection brings together the known works of Mary Wollstonecraft, the eighteenth-century philosopher, writer and women's rights advocate. Condemned by her contemporaries for her unconventional lifestyle, Wollstonecraft was later recognised as a founding figure of the feminist movement. She was also an acute observer of the political upheavals of the French revolution and advocated educational reform. Wollstonecraft's writings, which include A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and Thoughts on the Education of Daughters, are recognised as cornerstone texts in the development of feminist thought. This book is therefore a vital reference to the student of feminist history, and will also be of value to any reader interested in the origins of feminism. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aTodd, Janet,eeditor.1 aButler, Marilyn,eeditor.1 aRees-Mogg, Emma,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-works-of-mary-wollstonecraft/volumes/on-poetry-contributions-to-the-analytical-review-1788-1797 aBook02103nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450151002152600034003663000023004005000033004235200781004565380036012376500014012736500030012876500031013176500024013486500022013726500029013947000026014237000030014497000030014798560223015099750009017329781138764538UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387645388 a10.4324/9781138764538 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aThoughts on the Education of Daughters, The Female Reader, Original Stories, Letters on the Management of Infants, Lessonsh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis seven-volume collection brings together the known works of Mary Wollstonecraft, the eighteenth-century philosopher, writer and women's rights advocate. Condemned by her contemporaries for her unconventional lifestyle, Wollstonecraft was later recognised as a founding figure of the feminist movement. She was also an acute observer of the political upheavals of the French revolution and advocated educational reform. Wollstonecraft's writings, which include A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and Thoughts on the Education of Daughters, are recognised as cornerstone texts in the development of feminist thought. This book is therefore a vital reference to the student of feminist history, and will also be of value to any reader interested in the origins of feminism. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aTodd, Janet,eeditor.1 aButler, Marilyn,eeditor.1 aRees-Mogg, Emma,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/the-works-of-mary-wollstonecraft/volumes/thoughts-on-the-education-of-daughters-the-female-reader-original-stories-letters-on-the-management-of-infants-lessons aBook01310nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450055002152600034002703000023003045000033003275200301003605380036006616500014006976500030007116500031007416500024007726500022007966500029008187000026008478560090008739750009009639781851967179UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97818519671798 a10.4324/9781851967179 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aVarieties of Female Gothich[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis text offers scholarly and critical editions of significant novels of Gothic fiction from the Romantic period. It illustrates the various forms of female Gothic literature as a vehicle for representing the modern forms of subjectivity, or complex and authentic inward experience and identity. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aKelly, Gary,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/varieties-of-female-gothic aBook01369nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450067002152600034002823000023003165000033003395200301003725380036006736500014007096500030007236500031007536500024007846500022008086500029008307000026008598560137008859750009010229781138765672UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387656728 a10.4324/9781138765672 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aEnlightenment Gothic and Terror Gothich[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis text offers scholarly and critical editions of significant novels of Gothic fiction from the Romantic period. It illustrates the various forms of female Gothic literature as a vehicle for representing the modern forms of subjectivity, or complex and authentic inward experience and identity. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aKelly, Gary,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/varieties-of-female-gothic/volumes/enlightenment-gothic-and-terror-gothic aBook01319nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450042002152600034002573000023002915000033003145200301003475380036006486500014006846500030006986500031007286500024007596500022007836500029008057000026008348560112008609750009009729781138765696UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387656968 a10.4324/9781138765696 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aErotic Gothich[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis text offers scholarly and critical editions of significant novels of Gothic fiction from the Romantic period. It illustrates the various forms of female Gothic literature as a vehicle for representing the modern forms of subjectivity, or complex and authentic inward experience and identity. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aKelly, Gary,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/varieties-of-female-gothic/volumes/erotic-gothic aBook01327nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450046002152600034002613000023002955000033003185200301003515380036006526500014006886500030007026500031007326500024007636500022007876500029008097000026008388560116008649750009009809781138765702UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387657028 a10.4324/9781138765702 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aHistorical Gothich[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis text offers scholarly and critical editions of significant novels of Gothic fiction from the Romantic period. It illustrates the various forms of female Gothic literature as a vehicle for representing the modern forms of subjectivity, or complex and authentic inward experience and identity. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aKelly, Gary,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/varieties-of-female-gothic/volumes/historical-gothic aBook01329nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450046002152600034002613000023002955000033003185200301003515380036006526500014006886500030007026500031007326500024007636500022007876500029008097000026008388560118008649750009009829781138765719UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387657198 a10.4324/9781138765719 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aHistorical Gothich[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis text offers scholarly and critical editions of significant novels of Gothic fiction from the Romantic period. It illustrates the various forms of female Gothic literature as a vehicle for representing the modern forms of subjectivity, or complex and authentic inward experience and identity. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aKelly, Gary,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/varieties-of-female-gothic/volumes/historical-gothic-1 aBook01329nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450047002152600034002623000023002965000033003195200301003525380036006536500014006896500030007036500031007336500024007646500022007886500029008107000026008398560117008659750009009829781138765726UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387657268 a10.4324/9781138765726 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aOrientalist Gothich[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis text offers scholarly and critical editions of significant novels of Gothic fiction from the Romantic period. It illustrates the various forms of female Gothic literature as a vehicle for representing the modern forms of subjectivity, or complex and authentic inward experience and identity. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aKelly, Gary,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/varieties-of-female-gothic/volumes/orientalist-gothic aBook01346nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450069002152600034002843000023003185000033003415200301003745380036006756500014007116500030007256500031007556500024007866500022008106500029008327000026008618560112008879750009009999781138765689UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387656898 a10.4324/9781138765689 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aStreet Gothich[electronic resource] :bFemale Gothic Chapbooks. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis text offers scholarly and critical editions of significant novels of Gothic fiction from the Romantic period. It illustrates the various forms of female Gothic literature as a vehicle for representing the modern forms of subjectivity, or complex and authentic inward experience and identity. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aKelly, Gary,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/varieties-of-female-gothic/volumes/street-gothic aBook01253nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450080002152600034002953000023003295000033003525200194003855380036005796500014006156500030006296500031006596500024006906500022007146500029007367000030007658560111007959750009009069781851967711UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97818519677118 a10.4324/9781851967711 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aVarieties of Women's Sensation Fictionh[electronic resource] :b1855-1890. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFive 'sensation' novels are here presented complete and fully reset, along with scholarly annotation, a bibliography of 'sensation' fiction and articles contributing to contemporary debate. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMaunder, Andrew,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/varieties-of-womens-sensation-fiction-1855-1890 aBook01301nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450096002152600034003113000023003455000033003685200194004015380036005956500014006316500030006456500031006756500024007066500022007306500029007527000030007818560143008119750009009549781138765740UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387657408 a10.4324/9781138765740 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aDomestic Sensationalismh[electronic resource] :bFlorence Marryat, Love's Conflict (1865). a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFive 'sensation' novels are here presented complete and fully reset, along with scholarly annotation, a bibliography of 'sensation' fiction and articles contributing to contemporary debate. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMaunder, Andrew,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/varieties-of-womens-sensation-fiction-1855-1890/volumes/domestic-sensationalism aBook01287nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450088002152600034003033000023003375000033003605200194003935380036005876500014006236500030006376500031006676500024006986500022007226500029007447000026007738560141007999750009009409781138765757UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387657578 a10.4324/9781138765757 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aGothic Sensationalismh[electronic resource] :bEllen Wood, St Martin's Eve (1866). a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFive 'sensation' novels are here presented complete and fully reset, along with scholarly annotation, a bibliography of 'sensation' fiction and articles contributing to contemporary debate. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPykett, Lyn,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/varieties-of-womens-sensation-fiction-1855-1890/volumes/gothic-sensationalism aBook01296nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450094002152600034003093000023003435000033003665200194003995380036005936500014006296500030006436500031006736500024007046500022007286500029007507000026007798560144008059750009009499781138765788UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387657888 a10.4324/9781138765788 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aNewspaper Sensationalismh[electronic resource] :bDora Russell, Beneath the Wave (1878). a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFive 'sensation' novels are here presented complete and fully reset, along with scholarly annotation, a bibliography of 'sensation' fiction and articles contributing to contemporary debate. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aLaw, Graham,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/varieties-of-womens-sensation-fiction-1855-1890/volumes/newspaper-sensationalism aBook01302nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450100002152600034003153000023003495000033003725200194004055380036005996500014006356500030006496500031006796500024007106500022007346500029007567000027007858560143008129750009009559781138765771UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387657718 a10.4324/9781138765771 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aSensation and Detectionh[electronic resource] :bMary Cecil Hay, Old Myddelton's Money (1874). a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFive 'sensation' novels are here presented complete and fully reset, along with scholarly annotation, a bibliography of 'sensation' fiction and articles contributing to contemporary debate. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aKnight, Mark,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/varieties-of-womens-sensation-fiction-1855-1890/volumes/sensation-and-detection aBook01406nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450160002152600034003753000023004095000033004325200194004655380036006596500014006956500030007096500031007396500024007706500022007946500029008167000030008457000028008758560144009039750009010479781138765764UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387657648 a10.4324/9781138765764 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aSensation with a Purposeh[electronic resource] :bFelicia Skene, Hidden Depths (1866) Erotic Sensationalism Rhoda Broughton, Cometh up as a Flower (1867). a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFive 'sensation' novels are here presented complete and fully reset, along with scholarly annotation, a bibliography of 'sensation' fiction and articles contributing to contemporary debate. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aNayder, Lillian,eeditor.1 aHeller, Tamar,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/varieties-of-womens-sensation-fiction-1855-1890/volumes/sensation-with-a-purpose aBook01289nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450068002152600034002833000023003175000033003405200194003735380036005676500014006036500030006176500031006476500024006786500022007026500029007247000030007538560159007839750009009429781138765733UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387657338 a10.4324/9781138765733 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aSensationalism and the Sensation Debateh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFive 'sensation' novels are here presented complete and fully reset, along with scholarly annotation, a bibliography of 'sensation' fiction and articles contributing to contemporary debate. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMaunder, Andrew,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/varieties-of-womens-sensation-fiction-1855-1890/volumes/sensationalism-and-the-sensation-debate aBook03832nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450056002152600034002713000023003055000033003285202738003615380036030996500014031356500030031496500031031796500024032106500022032346500029032567000027032857000030033127000029033428560090033719750009034619780415472180UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154721808 a10.4324/9780415472180 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen and Belief, 1852-1928h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aOver recent years, research into religious belief during the Victorian period and the early twentieth century has grown in diversity and importance. The centrality of faith-based discourses to women of the period has long been recognized by scholars in the field. But until now relatively little significance has been attached to the fundamental relationship between women's faith and women's rights. This new title in the History of Feminism series remedies that omission. Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 is a six-volume collection of primary materials covering a wide range of opinions about women, their self-identity, and the combination of their spiritual and political beliefs. Addressing the most debated aspects of women's religious, social, cultural, and political rights, the collection adopts an historical overview of the period and provides an authoritative representation of the wide body of literature written by and about women's faith. Beginning with an example of how religious discourse provided a model for acceptable female behaviour and a satirical take on women's rights and spiritualism and ending with an economist's psychoanalytic study of female belief from 1928, Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 provides a unique collection of different viewpoints. It brings together the work of women writers, theologians, philosophers, and economic and cultural historians to illustrate the multiplicity of voices and opinions on the issues of suffrage and religious faith. This diversity is equally reflected in the broad geographical coverage of the collection which draws on works not only from the United Kingdom and United States but also includes materials from Canada and India, and moves beyond the Christian into the spheres of theosophy, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Judaism. The gathered materials include works of non-fiction, poetry, analytical works, satires, pamphlets, sermons, spiritual (auto)biography, and periodical articles. Making readily available such materialśwhich are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and usé Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. And with detailed and comprehensive introductory, biographical, and contextual material in each volume illustrating the ways in which the materials chart the gradual evolution of feminist thinking about belief, spirituality, and faith that directly fed into the emerging discourses of political and social rights for women, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aCox, Jessica,eeditor.1 aLlewellyn, Mark,eeditor.1 aMuller, Nadine,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-and-belief-1852-1928 aBook03869nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450058002152600034002733000023003075000033003305202738003635380036031016500014031376500030031516500031031816500024032126500022032366500029032587000027032877000030033147000029033448560125033739750009034989780415472227UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154722278 a10.4324/9780415472227 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen and Belief, 1852 - 1928h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aOver recent years, research into religious belief during the Victorian period and the early twentieth century has grown in diversity and importance. The centrality of faith-based discourses to women of the period has long been recognized by scholars in the field. But until now relatively little significance has been attached to the fundamental relationship between women's faith and women's rights. This new title in the History of Feminism series remedies that omission. Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 is a six-volume collection of primary materials covering a wide range of opinions about women, their self-identity, and the combination of their spiritual and political beliefs. Addressing the most debated aspects of women's religious, social, cultural, and political rights, the collection adopts an historical overview of the period and provides an authoritative representation of the wide body of literature written by and about women's faith. Beginning with an example of how religious discourse provided a model for acceptable female behaviour and a satirical take on women's rights and spiritualism and ending with an economist's psychoanalytic study of female belief from 1928, Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 provides a unique collection of different viewpoints. It brings together the work of women writers, theologians, philosophers, and economic and cultural historians to illustrate the multiplicity of voices and opinions on the issues of suffrage and religious faith. This diversity is equally reflected in the broad geographical coverage of the collection which draws on works not only from the United Kingdom and United States but also includes materials from Canada and India, and moves beyond the Christian into the spheres of theosophy, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Judaism. The gathered materials include works of non-fiction, poetry, analytical works, satires, pamphlets, sermons, spiritual (auto)biography, and periodical articles. Making readily available such materialśwhich are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and usé Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. And with detailed and comprehensive introductory, biographical, and contextual material in each volume illustrating the ways in which the materials chart the gradual evolution of feminist thinking about belief, spirituality, and faith that directly fed into the emerging discourses of political and social rights for women, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aCox, Jessica,eeditor.1 aLlewellyn, Mark,eeditor.1 aMuller, Nadine,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-and-belief-1852-1928/volumes/women-and-belief-1852-1928 aBook03871nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450058002152600034002733000023003075000033003305202738003635380036031016500014031376500030031516500031031816500024032126500022032366500029032587000027032877000030033147000029033448560127033739750009035009780415472197UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154721978 a10.4324/9780415472197 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen and Belief, 1852 - 1928h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aOver recent years, research into religious belief during the Victorian period and the early twentieth century has grown in diversity and importance. The centrality of faith-based discourses to women of the period has long been recognized by scholars in the field. But until now relatively little significance has been attached to the fundamental relationship between women's faith and women's rights. This new title in the History of Feminism series remedies that omission. Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 is a six-volume collection of primary materials covering a wide range of opinions about women, their self-identity, and the combination of their spiritual and political beliefs. Addressing the most debated aspects of women's religious, social, cultural, and political rights, the collection adopts an historical overview of the period and provides an authoritative representation of the wide body of literature written by and about women's faith. Beginning with an example of how religious discourse provided a model for acceptable female behaviour and a satirical take on women's rights and spiritualism and ending with an economist's psychoanalytic study of female belief from 1928, Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 provides a unique collection of different viewpoints. It brings together the work of women writers, theologians, philosophers, and economic and cultural historians to illustrate the multiplicity of voices and opinions on the issues of suffrage and religious faith. This diversity is equally reflected in the broad geographical coverage of the collection which draws on works not only from the United Kingdom and United States but also includes materials from Canada and India, and moves beyond the Christian into the spheres of theosophy, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Judaism. The gathered materials include works of non-fiction, poetry, analytical works, satires, pamphlets, sermons, spiritual (auto)biography, and periodical articles. Making readily available such materialśwhich are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and usé Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. And with detailed and comprehensive introductory, biographical, and contextual material in each volume illustrating the ways in which the materials chart the gradual evolution of feminist thinking about belief, spirituality, and faith that directly fed into the emerging discourses of political and social rights for women, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aCox, Jessica,eeditor.1 aLlewellyn, Mark,eeditor.1 aMuller, Nadine,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-and-belief-1852-1928/volumes/women-and-belief-1852-1928-1 aBook03871nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450058002152600034002733000023003075000033003305202738003635380036031016500014031376500030031516500031031816500024032126500022032366500029032587000027032877000030033147000029033448560127033739750009035009780415472203UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154722038 a10.4324/9780415472203 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen and Belief, 1852 - 1928h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aOver recent years, research into religious belief during the Victorian period and the early twentieth century has grown in diversity and importance. The centrality of faith-based discourses to women of the period has long been recognized by scholars in the field. But until now relatively little significance has been attached to the fundamental relationship between women's faith and women's rights. This new title in the History of Feminism series remedies that omission. Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 is a six-volume collection of primary materials covering a wide range of opinions about women, their self-identity, and the combination of their spiritual and political beliefs. Addressing the most debated aspects of women's religious, social, cultural, and political rights, the collection adopts an historical overview of the period and provides an authoritative representation of the wide body of literature written by and about women's faith. Beginning with an example of how religious discourse provided a model for acceptable female behaviour and a satirical take on women's rights and spiritualism and ending with an economist's psychoanalytic study of female belief from 1928, Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 provides a unique collection of different viewpoints. It brings together the work of women writers, theologians, philosophers, and economic and cultural historians to illustrate the multiplicity of voices and opinions on the issues of suffrage and religious faith. This diversity is equally reflected in the broad geographical coverage of the collection which draws on works not only from the United Kingdom and United States but also includes materials from Canada and India, and moves beyond the Christian into the spheres of theosophy, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Judaism. The gathered materials include works of non-fiction, poetry, analytical works, satires, pamphlets, sermons, spiritual (auto)biography, and periodical articles. Making readily available such materialśwhich are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and usé Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. And with detailed and comprehensive introductory, biographical, and contextual material in each volume illustrating the ways in which the materials chart the gradual evolution of feminist thinking about belief, spirituality, and faith that directly fed into the emerging discourses of political and social rights for women, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aCox, Jessica,eeditor.1 aLlewellyn, Mark,eeditor.1 aMuller, Nadine,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-and-belief-1852-1928/volumes/women-and-belief-1852-1928-2 aBook03871nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450058002152600034002733000023003075000033003305202738003635380036031016500014031376500030031516500031031816500024032126500022032366500029032587000027032877000030033147000029033448560127033739750009035009780415472210UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154722108 a10.4324/9780415472210 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen and Belief, 1852 - 1928h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aOver recent years, research into religious belief during the Victorian period and the early twentieth century has grown in diversity and importance. The centrality of faith-based discourses to women of the period has long been recognized by scholars in the field. But until now relatively little significance has been attached to the fundamental relationship between women's faith and women's rights. This new title in the History of Feminism series remedies that omission. Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 is a six-volume collection of primary materials covering a wide range of opinions about women, their self-identity, and the combination of their spiritual and political beliefs. Addressing the most debated aspects of women's religious, social, cultural, and political rights, the collection adopts an historical overview of the period and provides an authoritative representation of the wide body of literature written by and about women's faith. Beginning with an example of how religious discourse provided a model for acceptable female behaviour and a satirical take on women's rights and spiritualism and ending with an economist's psychoanalytic study of female belief from 1928, Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 provides a unique collection of different viewpoints. It brings together the work of women writers, theologians, philosophers, and economic and cultural historians to illustrate the multiplicity of voices and opinions on the issues of suffrage and religious faith. This diversity is equally reflected in the broad geographical coverage of the collection which draws on works not only from the United Kingdom and United States but also includes materials from Canada and India, and moves beyond the Christian into the spheres of theosophy, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Judaism. The gathered materials include works of non-fiction, poetry, analytical works, satires, pamphlets, sermons, spiritual (auto)biography, and periodical articles. Making readily available such materialśwhich are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and usé Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. And with detailed and comprehensive introductory, biographical, and contextual material in each volume illustrating the ways in which the materials chart the gradual evolution of feminist thinking about belief, spirituality, and faith that directly fed into the emerging discourses of political and social rights for women, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aCox, Jessica,eeditor.1 aLlewellyn, Mark,eeditor.1 aMuller, Nadine,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-and-belief-1852-1928/volumes/women-and-belief-1852-1928-3 aBook03871nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450058002152600034002733000023003075000033003305202738003635380036031016500014031376500030031516500031031816500024032126500022032366500029032587000027032877000030033147000029033448560127033739750009035009780415472234UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154722348 a10.4324/9780415472234 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen and Belief, 1852 - 1928h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aOver recent years, research into religious belief during the Victorian period and the early twentieth century has grown in diversity and importance. The centrality of faith-based discourses to women of the period has long been recognized by scholars in the field. But until now relatively little significance has been attached to the fundamental relationship between women's faith and women's rights. This new title in the History of Feminism series remedies that omission. Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 is a six-volume collection of primary materials covering a wide range of opinions about women, their self-identity, and the combination of their spiritual and political beliefs. Addressing the most debated aspects of women's religious, social, cultural, and political rights, the collection adopts an historical overview of the period and provides an authoritative representation of the wide body of literature written by and about women's faith. Beginning with an example of how religious discourse provided a model for acceptable female behaviour and a satirical take on women's rights and spiritualism and ending with an economist's psychoanalytic study of female belief from 1928, Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 provides a unique collection of different viewpoints. It brings together the work of women writers, theologians, philosophers, and economic and cultural historians to illustrate the multiplicity of voices and opinions on the issues of suffrage and religious faith. This diversity is equally reflected in the broad geographical coverage of the collection which draws on works not only from the United Kingdom and United States but also includes materials from Canada and India, and moves beyond the Christian into the spheres of theosophy, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Judaism. The gathered materials include works of non-fiction, poetry, analytical works, satires, pamphlets, sermons, spiritual (auto)biography, and periodical articles. Making readily available such materialśwhich are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and usé Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. And with detailed and comprehensive introductory, biographical, and contextual material in each volume illustrating the ways in which the materials chart the gradual evolution of feminist thinking about belief, spirituality, and faith that directly fed into the emerging discourses of political and social rights for women, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aCox, Jessica,eeditor.1 aLlewellyn, Mark,eeditor.1 aMuller, Nadine,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-and-belief-1852-1928/volumes/women-and-belief-1852-1928-4 aBook03871nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450058002152600034002733000023003075000033003305202738003635380036031016500014031376500030031516500031031816500024032126500022032366500029032587000027032877000030033147000029033448560127033739750009035009780415472241UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804154722418 a10.4324/9780415472241 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen and Belief, 1852 - 1928h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aOver recent years, research into religious belief during the Victorian period and the early twentieth century has grown in diversity and importance. The centrality of faith-based discourses to women of the period has long been recognized by scholars in the field. But until now relatively little significance has been attached to the fundamental relationship between women's faith and women's rights. This new title in the History of Feminism series remedies that omission. Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 is a six-volume collection of primary materials covering a wide range of opinions about women, their self-identity, and the combination of their spiritual and political beliefs. Addressing the most debated aspects of women's religious, social, cultural, and political rights, the collection adopts an historical overview of the period and provides an authoritative representation of the wide body of literature written by and about women's faith. Beginning with an example of how religious discourse provided a model for acceptable female behaviour and a satirical take on women's rights and spiritualism and ending with an economist's psychoanalytic study of female belief from 1928, Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 provides a unique collection of different viewpoints. It brings together the work of women writers, theologians, philosophers, and economic and cultural historians to illustrate the multiplicity of voices and opinions on the issues of suffrage and religious faith. This diversity is equally reflected in the broad geographical coverage of the collection which draws on works not only from the United Kingdom and United States but also includes materials from Canada and India, and moves beyond the Christian into the spheres of theosophy, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Judaism. The gathered materials include works of non-fiction, poetry, analytical works, satires, pamphlets, sermons, spiritual (auto)biography, and periodical articles. Making readily available such materialśwhich are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and usé Women and Belief, 1852 - 1928 is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. And with detailed and comprehensive introductory, biographical, and contextual material in each volume illustrating the ways in which the materials chart the gradual evolution of feminist thinking about belief, spirituality, and faith that directly fed into the emerging discourses of political and social rights for women, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aCox, Jessica,eeditor.1 aLlewellyn, Mark,eeditor.1 aMuller, Nadine,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-and-belief-1852-1928/volumes/women-and-belief-1852-1928-5 aBook02557nam a2200385Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450107002152600034003223000023003565000033003795201320004125380036017326500014017686500030017826500031018126500024018436500022018676500029018897000031019187000030019497000031019797000032020107000030020428560090020729750009021629780415310925UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153109258 a10.4324/9780415310925 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aWomen and Empire, 1750-1939h[electronic resource] :bPrimary Sources on Gender and Anglo-Imperialism. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aWomen and Empire, 1750 - 1939: Primary Sources on Gender and Anglo-Imperialism functions to extend significantly the range of the History of Feminism series (co-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse), bringing together the histories of British and American women's emancipation, represented in earlier sets, into juxtaposition with histories produced by different kinds of imperial and colonial governments. The alignment of writings from a range of Anglo-imperial contexts reveals the overlapping histories and problems, while foregrounding cultural specificities and contextual inflections of imperialism. The volumes focus on countries, regions, or continents formerly colonized (in part) by Britain: - Volume I: Australia - Volume II: New Zealand - Volume III: Africa - Volume IV: India - Volume V: Canada Perhaps the most novel aspect of this collection is its capacity to highlight the common aspects of the functions of empire in their impact on women and their production of gender, and conversely, to demonstrate the actual specificity of particular regional manifestations. Concerning questions of power, gender, class and race, this new Routledge - Edition Synapse Major Work will be of particular interest to scholars and students of imperialism, colonization, women's history, and women's writing. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMartin, Susan K.,eeditor.1 aDaley, Caroline,eeditor.1 aDevereux, Cecily,eeditor.1 aDimock, Elizabeth,eeditor.1 aCassidy, Cheryl,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-and-empire-1750-1939 aBook02506nam a2200385Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450038002152600034002533000023002875000033003105201320003435380036016636500014016996500030017136500031017436500024017746500022017986500029018207000031018497000030018807000031019107000032019417000030019738560108020039750009021119780415310932UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153109328 a10.4324/9780415310932 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aAustraliah[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aWomen and Empire, 1750 - 1939: Primary Sources on Gender and Anglo-Imperialism functions to extend significantly the range of the History of Feminism series (co-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse), bringing together the histories of British and American women's emancipation, represented in earlier sets, into juxtaposition with histories produced by different kinds of imperial and colonial governments. The alignment of writings from a range of Anglo-imperial contexts reveals the overlapping histories and problems, while foregrounding cultural specificities and contextual inflections of imperialism. The volumes focus on countries, regions, or continents formerly colonized (in part) by Britain: - Volume I: Australia - Volume II: New Zealand - Volume III: Africa - Volume IV: India - Volume V: Canada Perhaps the most novel aspect of this collection is its capacity to highlight the common aspects of the functions of empire in their impact on women and their production of gender, and conversely, to demonstrate the actual specificity of particular regional manifestations. Concerning questions of power, gender, class and race, this new Routledge - Edition Synapse Major Work will be of particular interest to scholars and students of imperialism, colonization, women's history, and women's writing. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMartin, Susan K.,eeditor.1 aDaley, Caroline,eeditor.1 aDevereux, Cecily,eeditor.1 aDimock, Elizabeth,eeditor.1 aCassidy, Cheryl,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-and-empire-1750-1939/volumes/australia aBook02498nam a2200385Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450034002152600034002493000023002835000033003065201320003395380036016596500014016956500030017096500031017396500024017706500022017946500029018167000031018457000030018767000031019067000032019377000030019698560104019999750009021039780415310963UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153109638 a10.4324/9780415310963 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aIndiah[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aWomen and Empire, 1750 - 1939: Primary Sources on Gender and Anglo-Imperialism functions to extend significantly the range of the History of Feminism series (co-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse), bringing together the histories of British and American women's emancipation, represented in earlier sets, into juxtaposition with histories produced by different kinds of imperial and colonial governments. The alignment of writings from a range of Anglo-imperial contexts reveals the overlapping histories and problems, while foregrounding cultural specificities and contextual inflections of imperialism. The volumes focus on countries, regions, or continents formerly colonized (in part) by Britain: - Volume I: Australia - Volume II: New Zealand - Volume III: Africa - Volume IV: India - Volume V: Canada Perhaps the most novel aspect of this collection is its capacity to highlight the common aspects of the functions of empire in their impact on women and their production of gender, and conversely, to demonstrate the actual specificity of particular regional manifestations. Concerning questions of power, gender, class and race, this new Routledge - Edition Synapse Major Work will be of particular interest to scholars and students of imperialism, colonization, women's history, and women's writing. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMartin, Susan K.,eeditor.1 aDaley, Caroline,eeditor.1 aDevereux, Cecily,eeditor.1 aDimock, Elizabeth,eeditor.1 aCassidy, Cheryl,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-and-empire-1750-1939/volumes/india aBook02510nam a2200385Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450040002152600034002553000023002895000033003125201320003455380036016656500014017016500030017156500031017456500024017766500022018006500029018227000031018517000030018827000031019127000032019437000030019758560110020059750009021159780415310949UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153109498 a10.4324/9780415310949 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aNew Zealandh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aWomen and Empire, 1750 - 1939: Primary Sources on Gender and Anglo-Imperialism functions to extend significantly the range of the History of Feminism series (co-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse), bringing together the histories of British and American women's emancipation, represented in earlier sets, into juxtaposition with histories produced by different kinds of imperial and colonial governments. The alignment of writings from a range of Anglo-imperial contexts reveals the overlapping histories and problems, while foregrounding cultural specificities and contextual inflections of imperialism. The volumes focus on countries, regions, or continents formerly colonized (in part) by Britain: - Volume I: Australia - Volume II: New Zealand - Volume III: Africa - Volume IV: India - Volume V: Canada Perhaps the most novel aspect of this collection is its capacity to highlight the common aspects of the functions of empire in their impact on women and their production of gender, and conversely, to demonstrate the actual specificity of particular regional manifestations. Concerning questions of power, gender, class and race, this new Routledge - Edition Synapse Major Work will be of particular interest to scholars and students of imperialism, colonization, women's history, and women's writing. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aMartin, Susan K.,eeditor.1 aDaley, Caroline,eeditor.1 aDevereux, Cecily,eeditor.1 aDimock, Elizabeth,eeditor.1 aCassidy, Cheryl,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-and-empire-1750-1939/volumes/new-zealand aBook03230nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450054002152600034002693000023003035000033003265202211003595380036025706500014026066500030026206500031026506500024026816500022027056500029027277000039027568560088027959750009028839780415680400UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804156804008 a10.4324/9780415680400 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen, Beauty and Fashionh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aCo-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, the History of Feminism series makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of women's and gender studies, women's history, and women's writing, as well as those working in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by expert editors, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. This new title in the series brings together in six volumes a unique range of Victorian and Edwardian texts on Women, Beauty, and Fashion. The learned editor has organized the set around three principal thematic categories ('Personal Beauty and Care', 'Beauty, Fashion, and Health', and 'Beauty Education and Self-Management') which move chronologically from the late 1830s to the 1910s. The materials gathered here are representative of the body of texts written on beauty and fashion with reference to women's (self-) perception and (self-) definition. Combining the issues of fashion with those of economy, education, and physical culture, the collection offers a range of diverging views. The diversity of the gathered materials is mirrored in their generic range and in the varied professional background of their authors. The collection includes, but is not limited to, religious treatises and dress reformers' pamphlets, personal-care manuals by society ladies, advice books by (alleged) specialists, and manufacturers' attempts at self-advertising. Making readily available materials which are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and use, Women, Beauty, and Fashion is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. Each volume is also supplemented by substantial introductions, newly written by the editor, which contextualize the material. And with a detailed appendix providing data on the provenance of the gathered works, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPietrzak-Franger, Monika,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-beauty-and-fashion aBook03287nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450066002152600034002813000023003155000033003385202211003715380036025826500014026186500030026326500031026626500024026936500022027176500029027397000039027688560133028079750009029409780415680462UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804156804628 a10.4324/9780415680462 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aBeauty, Education and Self-Managementh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aCo-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, the History of Feminism series makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of women's and gender studies, women's history, and women's writing, as well as those working in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by expert editors, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. This new title in the series brings together in six volumes a unique range of Victorian and Edwardian texts on Women, Beauty, and Fashion. The learned editor has organized the set around three principal thematic categories ('Personal Beauty and Care', 'Beauty, Fashion, and Health', and 'Beauty Education and Self-Management') which move chronologically from the late 1830s to the 1910s. The materials gathered here are representative of the body of texts written on beauty and fashion with reference to women's (self-) perception and (self-) definition. Combining the issues of fashion with those of economy, education, and physical culture, the collection offers a range of diverging views. The diversity of the gathered materials is mirrored in their generic range and in the varied professional background of their authors. The collection includes, but is not limited to, religious treatises and dress reformers' pamphlets, personal-care manuals by society ladies, advice books by (alleged) specialists, and manufacturers' attempts at self-advertising. Making readily available materials which are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and use, Women, Beauty, and Fashion is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. Each volume is also supplemented by substantial introductions, newly written by the editor, which contextualize the material. And with a detailed appendix providing data on the provenance of the gathered works, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPietrzak-Franger, Monika,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-beauty-and-fashion/volumes/beauty-education-and-self-management aBook03265nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450055002152600034002703000023003045000033003275202211003605380036025716500014026076500030026216500031026516500024026826500022027066500029027287000039027578560122027969750009029189780415680448UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804156804488 a10.4324/9780415680448 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aBeauty, Fashion and Healthh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aCo-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, the History of Feminism series makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of women's and gender studies, women's history, and women's writing, as well as those working in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by expert editors, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. This new title in the series brings together in six volumes a unique range of Victorian and Edwardian texts on Women, Beauty, and Fashion. The learned editor has organized the set around three principal thematic categories ('Personal Beauty and Care', 'Beauty, Fashion, and Health', and 'Beauty Education and Self-Management') which move chronologically from the late 1830s to the 1910s. The materials gathered here are representative of the body of texts written on beauty and fashion with reference to women's (self-) perception and (self-) definition. Combining the issues of fashion with those of economy, education, and physical culture, the collection offers a range of diverging views. The diversity of the gathered materials is mirrored in their generic range and in the varied professional background of their authors. The collection includes, but is not limited to, religious treatises and dress reformers' pamphlets, personal-care manuals by society ladies, advice books by (alleged) specialists, and manufacturers' attempts at self-advertising. Making readily available materials which are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and use, Women, Beauty, and Fashion is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. Each volume is also supplemented by substantial introductions, newly written by the editor, which contextualize the material. And with a detailed appendix providing data on the provenance of the gathered works, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPietrzak-Franger, Monika,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-beauty-and-fashion/volumes/beauty-fashion-and-health aBook03267nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450055002152600034002703000023003045000033003275202211003605380036025716500014026076500030026216500031026516500024026826500022027066500029027287000039027578560124027969750009029209780415680455UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804156804558 a10.4324/9780415680455 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aBeauty, Fashion and Healthh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aCo-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, the History of Feminism series makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of women's and gender studies, women's history, and women's writing, as well as those working in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by expert editors, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. This new title in the series brings together in six volumes a unique range of Victorian and Edwardian texts on Women, Beauty, and Fashion. The learned editor has organized the set around three principal thematic categories ('Personal Beauty and Care', 'Beauty, Fashion, and Health', and 'Beauty Education and Self-Management') which move chronologically from the late 1830s to the 1910s. The materials gathered here are representative of the body of texts written on beauty and fashion with reference to women's (self-) perception and (self-) definition. Combining the issues of fashion with those of economy, education, and physical culture, the collection offers a range of diverging views. The diversity of the gathered materials is mirrored in their generic range and in the varied professional background of their authors. The collection includes, but is not limited to, religious treatises and dress reformers' pamphlets, personal-care manuals by society ladies, advice books by (alleged) specialists, and manufacturers' attempts at self-advertising. Making readily available materials which are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and use, Women, Beauty, and Fashion is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. Each volume is also supplemented by substantial introductions, newly written by the editor, which contextualize the material. And with a detailed appendix providing data on the provenance of the gathered works, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPietrzak-Franger, Monika,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-beauty-and-fashion/volumes/beauty-fashion-and-health-1 aBook03262nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450053002152600034002683000023003025000033003255202211003585380036025696500014026056500030026196500031026496500024026806500022027046500029027267000039027558560121027949750009029159780415680417UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804156804178 a10.4324/9780415680417 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPersonal Beauty and Careh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aCo-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, the History of Feminism series makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of women's and gender studies, women's history, and women's writing, as well as those working in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by expert editors, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. This new title in the series brings together in six volumes a unique range of Victorian and Edwardian texts on Women, Beauty, and Fashion. The learned editor has organized the set around three principal thematic categories ('Personal Beauty and Care', 'Beauty, Fashion, and Health', and 'Beauty Education and Self-Management') which move chronologically from the late 1830s to the 1910s. The materials gathered here are representative of the body of texts written on beauty and fashion with reference to women's (self-) perception and (self-) definition. Combining the issues of fashion with those of economy, education, and physical culture, the collection offers a range of diverging views. The diversity of the gathered materials is mirrored in their generic range and in the varied professional background of their authors. The collection includes, but is not limited to, religious treatises and dress reformers' pamphlets, personal-care manuals by society ladies, advice books by (alleged) specialists, and manufacturers' attempts at self-advertising. Making readily available materials which are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and use, Women, Beauty, and Fashion is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. Each volume is also supplemented by substantial introductions, newly written by the editor, which contextualize the material. And with a detailed appendix providing data on the provenance of the gathered works, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPietrzak-Franger, Monika,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-beauty-and-fashion/volumes/personal-beauty-and-care aBook03264nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450053002152600034002683000023003025000033003255202211003585380036025696500014026056500030026196500031026496500024026806500022027046500029027267000039027558560123027949750009029179780415680424UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804156804248 a10.4324/9780415680424 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPersonal Beauty and Careh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aCo-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, the History of Feminism series makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of women's and gender studies, women's history, and women's writing, as well as those working in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by expert editors, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. This new title in the series brings together in six volumes a unique range of Victorian and Edwardian texts on Women, Beauty, and Fashion. The learned editor has organized the set around three principal thematic categories ('Personal Beauty and Care', 'Beauty, Fashion, and Health', and 'Beauty Education and Self-Management') which move chronologically from the late 1830s to the 1910s. The materials gathered here are representative of the body of texts written on beauty and fashion with reference to women's (self-) perception and (self-) definition. Combining the issues of fashion with those of economy, education, and physical culture, the collection offers a range of diverging views. The diversity of the gathered materials is mirrored in their generic range and in the varied professional background of their authors. The collection includes, but is not limited to, religious treatises and dress reformers' pamphlets, personal-care manuals by society ladies, advice books by (alleged) specialists, and manufacturers' attempts at self-advertising. Making readily available materials which are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and use, Women, Beauty, and Fashion is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. Each volume is also supplemented by substantial introductions, newly written by the editor, which contextualize the material. And with a detailed appendix providing data on the provenance of the gathered works, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPietrzak-Franger, Monika,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-beauty-and-fashion/volumes/personal-beauty-and-care-1 aBook03264nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450053002152600034002683000023003025000033003255202211003585380036025696500014026056500030026196500031026496500024026806500022027046500029027267000039027558560123027949750009029179780415680431UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804156804318 a10.4324/9780415680431 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aPersonal Beauty and Careh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aCo-published by Routledge and Edition Synapse, the History of Feminism series makes key archival source material readily available to scholars, researchers, and students of women's and gender studies, women's history, and women's writing, as well as those working in allied and related fields. Selected and introduced by expert editors, the gathered materials are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. This new title in the series brings together in six volumes a unique range of Victorian and Edwardian texts on Women, Beauty, and Fashion. The learned editor has organized the set around three principal thematic categories ('Personal Beauty and Care', 'Beauty, Fashion, and Health', and 'Beauty Education and Self-Management') which move chronologically from the late 1830s to the 1910s. The materials gathered here are representative of the body of texts written on beauty and fashion with reference to women's (self-) perception and (self-) definition. Combining the issues of fashion with those of economy, education, and physical culture, the collection offers a range of diverging views. The diversity of the gathered materials is mirrored in their generic range and in the varied professional background of their authors. The collection includes, but is not limited to, religious treatises and dress reformers' pamphlets, personal-care manuals by society ladies, advice books by (alleged) specialists, and manufacturers' attempts at self-advertising. Making readily available materials which are currently very difficult for scholars, researchers, and students across the globe to locate and use, Women, Beauty, and Fashion is a veritable treasure-trove. The gathered works are reproduced in facsimile, giving users a strong sense of immediacy to the texts and permitting citation to the original pagination. Each volume is also supplemented by substantial introductions, newly written by the editor, which contextualize the material. And with a detailed appendix providing data on the provenance of the gathered works, the collection is destined to be welcomed as a vital reference and research resource. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPietrzak-Franger, Monika,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-beauty-and-fashion/volumes/personal-beauty-and-care-2 aBook01991nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450059002152600034002743000023003085000033003315200975003645380036013396500014013756500030013896500031014196500024014506500022014746500029014967000027015258560092015529750009016449780415323024UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153230248 a10.4324/9780415323024 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aWomen & Cross Dressing 1800-39h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis three-volume collection focuses on writings by and about cross-dressing women from the early nineteenth century up until the beginning of World War II. In so doing, it provides a new perspective on one of the most decisive periods in the history of feminism. The anthology brings together for the first time key texts from the sexological and the literary realms, as well as newspaper articles, letters and photographs, which document the phenomenon of cross-dressing women in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century British culture. The collection also includes translations from European texts that impacted on British understandings of cross-dressing during this time. A fascinating work, each of the volumes is introduced separately with a critical essay, and is divided thematically to include sections devoted to theories, fictions and fictionalisations, and lives. Together, these volumes make available important source material for the history of feminism. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aBauer, Heike,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-cross-dressing-1800-39 aBook02023nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450057002152600034002723000023003065000033003295200975003625380036013376500014013736500030013876500031014176500024014486500022014726500029014947000027015238560126015509750009016769780415323000UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153230008 a10.4324/9780415323000 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aFictions and Lives (Part 1).h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis three-volume collection focuses on writings by and about cross-dressing women from the early nineteenth century up until the beginning of World War II. In so doing, it provides a new perspective on one of the most decisive periods in the history of feminism. The anthology brings together for the first time key texts from the sexological and the literary realms, as well as newspaper articles, letters and photographs, which document the phenomenon of cross-dressing women in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century British culture. The collection also includes translations from European texts that impacted on British understandings of cross-dressing during this time. A fascinating work, each of the volumes is introduced separately with a critical essay, and is divided thematically to include sections devoted to theories, fictions and fictionalisations, and lives. Together, these volumes make available important source material for the history of feminism. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aBauer, Heike,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-cross-dressing-1800-39/volumes/fictions-and-lives-part-1 aBook02023nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450057002152600034002723000023003065000033003295200975003625380036013376500014013736500030013876500031014176500024014486500022014726500029014947000027015238560126015509750009016769780415323017UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153230178 a10.4324/9780415323017 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aFictions and Lives (Part 2).h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis three-volume collection focuses on writings by and about cross-dressing women from the early nineteenth century up until the beginning of World War II. In so doing, it provides a new perspective on one of the most decisive periods in the history of feminism. The anthology brings together for the first time key texts from the sexological and the literary realms, as well as newspaper articles, letters and photographs, which document the phenomenon of cross-dressing women in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century British culture. The collection also includes translations from European texts that impacted on British understandings of cross-dressing during this time. A fascinating work, each of the volumes is introduced separately with a critical essay, and is divided thematically to include sections devoted to theories, fictions and fictionalisations, and lives. Together, these volumes make available important source material for the history of feminism. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aBauer, Heike,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-cross-dressing-1800-39/volumes/fictions-and-lives-part-2 aBook02027nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450078002152600034002933000023003275000033003505200975003835380036013586500014013946500030014086500031014386500024014696500022014936500029015157000027015448560109015719750009016809780415322997UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153229978 a10.4324/9780415322997 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736910aTheoriesh[electronic resource] :bSexology and the Taxonomies of Gender. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis three-volume collection focuses on writings by and about cross-dressing women from the early nineteenth century up until the beginning of World War II. In so doing, it provides a new perspective on one of the most decisive periods in the history of feminism. The anthology brings together for the first time key texts from the sexological and the literary realms, as well as newspaper articles, letters and photographs, which document the phenomenon of cross-dressing women in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century British culture. The collection also includes translations from European texts that impacted on British understandings of cross-dressing during this time. A fascinating work, each of the volumes is introduced separately with a critical essay, and is divided thematically to include sections devoted to theories, fictions and fictionalisations, and lives. Together, these volumes make available important source material for the history of feminism. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aBauer, Heike,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-cross-dressing-1800-39/volumes/theories aBook02080nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450060002152600034002753000023003095000033003325200976003655380036013416500014013776500030013916500031014216500024014526500022014766500029014987000026015277000031015537000031015848560094016159750009017099780415276337UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804152763378 a10.4324/9780415276337 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen, Madness and Spiritualismh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis set reproduces seminal writings by three exceptional nineteenth-century women. Georgina Weldon, Louisa Lowe and Susan Willis Fletcher were certified as insane by the Victorian medical establishment and were threatened with incarceration for their eccentric and transgressive behaviour. All three were remarkably resourceful and very successfully manipulated the sensationalist press to expose the 'lunacy laws' to the late-Victorian public. In doing this, they contributed to the emerging feminist critique of medicine and science. Each volume is devoted to the work of one of these exceptional women. New introductions by the editors and the late Roy Porter provide context and discussion of the pieces included, pointing to the themes and issues that they raise. With an extensive index, this collection provides an invaluable resource for those studying the role of feminism in the history of medicine and the power of the medical profession in the Victorian era. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPorter, Roy,eeditor.1 aNicholson, Helen,eeditor.1 aBennett, Bridget,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-madness-and-spiritualism aBook02077nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450060002152600034002753000023003095000033003325200976003655380036013416500014013776500030013916500031014216500024014526500022014766500029014987000026015277000031015538560134015849750009017189780415276344UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804152763448 a10.4324/9780415276344 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aGeorgina Weldon and Louisa Loweh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis set reproduces seminal writings by three exceptional nineteenth-century women. Georgina Weldon, Louisa Lowe and Susan Willis Fletcher were certified as insane by the Victorian medical establishment and were threatened with incarceration for their eccentric and transgressive behaviour. All three were remarkably resourceful and very successfully manipulated the sensationalist press to expose the 'lunacy laws' to the late-Victorian public. In doing this, they contributed to the emerging feminist critique of medicine and science. Each volume is devoted to the work of one of these exceptional women. New introductions by the editors and the late Roy Porter provide context and discussion of the pieces included, pointing to the themes and issues that they raise. With an extensive index, this collection provides an invaluable resource for those studying the role of feminism in the history of medicine and the power of the medical profession in the Victorian era. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aPorter, Roy,eeditor.1 aNicholson, Helen,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-madness-and-spiritualism/volumes/georgina-weldon-and-louisa-lowe aBook02019nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450050002152600034002653000023002995000033003225200976003555380036013316500014013676500030013816500031014116500024014426500022014666500029014887000031015178560124015489750009016729780415276351UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804152763518 a10.4324/9780415276351 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSusan Willis Fletcherh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThis set reproduces seminal writings by three exceptional nineteenth-century women. Georgina Weldon, Louisa Lowe and Susan Willis Fletcher were certified as insane by the Victorian medical establishment and were threatened with incarceration for their eccentric and transgressive behaviour. All three were remarkably resourceful and very successfully manipulated the sensationalist press to expose the 'lunacy laws' to the late-Victorian public. In doing this, they contributed to the emerging feminist critique of medicine and science. Each volume is devoted to the work of one of these exceptional women. New introductions by the editors and the late Roy Porter provide context and discussion of the pieces included, pointing to the themes and issues that they raise. With an extensive index, this collection provides an invaluable resource for those studying the role of feminism in the history of medicine and the power of the medical profession in the Victorian era. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aBennett, Bridget,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/women-madness-and-spiritualism/volumes/susan-willis-fletcher aBook02385nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450056002152600034002713000023003055000033003285201286003615380036016476500014016836500030016976500031017276500024017586500022017826500029018047000032018337000030018657000029018958560090019249750009020149780415357449UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153574498 a10.4324/9780415357449 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen's Suffrage Literatureh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aWomen's Suffrage Literature is a new Major Work from Routledge and Edition Synapse. It makes available in facsimile key texts which represent the wealth of creative writing that emerged around the issue of women's suffrage in the early twentieth century. The collection includes five significant novels, a wide range of drama and representative short stories. Selected in order to illustrate the diversity of concerns and positions with the campaign for women's suffrage, the texts also reflect the different literary models adopted. They cover a range of key moments within and after the campaign for the vote, revealing changes in perspective and tactics between 1907 and 1924. The selected texts problematize categories such as pro- and anti-suffrage writing, reveal the complex relationship between definitions of a 'feminist' and a 'suffrage' text and raise questions about critical approaches to such politicized writings. The collection is organized so as to provide some historical coverage of this key period; to allow comparative analysis of different genres; and to demonstrate the variety of concerns and discourses which defined this campaign. It has been edited by a team of academics with long experience of researching and teaching in the field of women's suffrage. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aCockin, Katharine,eeditor.1 aNorquay, Glenda,eeditor.1 aPark, Sowon S.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-suffrage-literature aBook02395nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450043002152600034002583000023002925000033003155201286003485380036016346500014016706500030016846500031017146500024017456500022017696500029017917000032018207000030018527000029018828560113019119750009020249780415357470UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153574708 a10.4324/9780415357470 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aSuffrage Dramah[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aWomen's Suffrage Literature is a new Major Work from Routledge and Edition Synapse. It makes available in facsimile key texts which represent the wealth of creative writing that emerged around the issue of women's suffrage in the early twentieth century. The collection includes five significant novels, a wide range of drama and representative short stories. Selected in order to illustrate the diversity of concerns and positions with the campaign for women's suffrage, the texts also reflect the different literary models adopted. They cover a range of key moments within and after the campaign for the vote, revealing changes in perspective and tactics between 1907 and 1924. The selected texts problematize categories such as pro- and anti-suffrage writing, reveal the complex relationship between definitions of a 'feminist' and a 'suffrage' text and raise questions about critical approaches to such politicized writings. The collection is organized so as to provide some historical coverage of this key period; to allow comparative analysis of different genres; and to demonstrate the variety of concerns and discourses which defined this campaign. It has been edited by a team of academics with long experience of researching and teaching in the field of women's suffrage. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aCockin, Katharine,eeditor.1 aNorquay, Glenda,eeditor.1 aPark, Sowon S.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-suffrage-literature/volumes/suffrage-drama aBook02383nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450037002152600034002523000023002865000033003095201286003425380036016286500014016646500030016786500031017086500024017396500022017636500029017857000032018147000030018467000029018768560107019059750009020129780415357500UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153575008 a10.4324/9780415357500 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Callh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aWomen's Suffrage Literature is a new Major Work from Routledge and Edition Synapse. It makes available in facsimile key texts which represent the wealth of creative writing that emerged around the issue of women's suffrage in the early twentieth century. The collection includes five significant novels, a wide range of drama and representative short stories. Selected in order to illustrate the diversity of concerns and positions with the campaign for women's suffrage, the texts also reflect the different literary models adopted. They cover a range of key moments within and after the campaign for the vote, revealing changes in perspective and tactics between 1907 and 1924. The selected texts problematize categories such as pro- and anti-suffrage writing, reveal the complex relationship between definitions of a 'feminist' and a 'suffrage' text and raise questions about critical approaches to such politicized writings. The collection is organized so as to provide some historical coverage of this key period; to allow comparative analysis of different genres; and to demonstrate the variety of concerns and discourses which defined this campaign. It has been edited by a team of academics with long experience of researching and teaching in the field of women's suffrage. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aCockin, Katharine,eeditor.1 aNorquay, Glenda,eeditor.1 aPark, Sowon S.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-suffrage-literature/volumes/the-call aBook02429nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450060002152600034002753000023003095000033003325201286003655380036016516500014016876500030017016500031017316500024017626500022017866500029018087000032018377000030018697000029018998560130019289750009020589780415357463UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153574638 a10.4324/9780415357463 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Fiction of Gertrude Colmoreh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aWomen's Suffrage Literature is a new Major Work from Routledge and Edition Synapse. It makes available in facsimile key texts which represent the wealth of creative writing that emerged around the issue of women's suffrage in the early twentieth century. The collection includes five significant novels, a wide range of drama and representative short stories. Selected in order to illustrate the diversity of concerns and positions with the campaign for women's suffrage, the texts also reflect the different literary models adopted. They cover a range of key moments within and after the campaign for the vote, revealing changes in perspective and tactics between 1907 and 1924. The selected texts problematize categories such as pro- and anti-suffrage writing, reveal the complex relationship between definitions of a 'feminist' and a 'suffrage' text and raise questions about critical approaches to such politicized writings. The collection is organized so as to provide some historical coverage of this key period; to allow comparative analysis of different genres; and to demonstrate the variety of concerns and discourses which defined this campaign. It has been edited by a team of academics with long experience of researching and teaching in the field of women's suffrage. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aCockin, Katharine,eeditor.1 aNorquay, Glenda,eeditor.1 aPark, Sowon S.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-suffrage-literature/volumes/the-fiction-of-gertrude-colmore aBook02401nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450046002152600034002613000023002955000033003185201286003515380036016376500014016736500030016876500031017176500024017486500022017726500029017947000032018237000030018557000029018858560116019149750009020309780415357494UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153574948 a10.4324/9780415357494 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Home-Breakersh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aWomen's Suffrage Literature is a new Major Work from Routledge and Edition Synapse. It makes available in facsimile key texts which represent the wealth of creative writing that emerged around the issue of women's suffrage in the early twentieth century. The collection includes five significant novels, a wide range of drama and representative short stories. Selected in order to illustrate the diversity of concerns and positions with the campaign for women's suffrage, the texts also reflect the different literary models adopted. They cover a range of key moments within and after the campaign for the vote, revealing changes in perspective and tactics between 1907 and 1924. The selected texts problematize categories such as pro- and anti-suffrage writing, reveal the complex relationship between definitions of a 'feminist' and a 'suffrage' text and raise questions about critical approaches to such politicized writings. The collection is organized so as to provide some historical coverage of this key period; to allow comparative analysis of different genres; and to demonstrate the variety of concerns and discourses which defined this campaign. It has been edited by a team of academics with long experience of researching and teaching in the field of women's suffrage. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aCockin, Katharine,eeditor.1 aNorquay, Glenda,eeditor.1 aPark, Sowon S.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-suffrage-literature/volumes/the-home-breakers aBook02423nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450058002152600034002733000023003075000033003305201286003635380036016496500014016856500030016996500031017296500024017606500022017846500029018067000032018357000030018677000029018978560126019269750009020529780415357487UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153574878 a10.4324/9780415357487 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Politics of (non) Romanceh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aWomen's Suffrage Literature is a new Major Work from Routledge and Edition Synapse. It makes available in facsimile key texts which represent the wealth of creative writing that emerged around the issue of women's suffrage in the early twentieth century. The collection includes five significant novels, a wide range of drama and representative short stories. Selected in order to illustrate the diversity of concerns and positions with the campaign for women's suffrage, the texts also reflect the different literary models adopted. They cover a range of key moments within and after the campaign for the vote, revealing changes in perspective and tactics between 1907 and 1924. The selected texts problematize categories such as pro- and anti-suffrage writing, reveal the complex relationship between definitions of a 'feminist' and a 'suffrage' text and raise questions about critical approaches to such politicized writings. The collection is organized so as to provide some historical coverage of this key period; to allow comparative analysis of different genres; and to demonstrate the variety of concerns and discourses which defined this campaign. It has been edited by a team of academics with long experience of researching and teaching in the field of women's suffrage. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aCockin, Katharine,eeditor.1 aNorquay, Glenda,eeditor.1 aPark, Sowon S.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-suffrage-literature/volumes/the-politics-of-non-romance aBook02407nam a2200361Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450049002152600034002643000023002985000033003215201286003545380036016406500014016766500030016906500031017206500024017516500022017756500029017977000032018267000030018587000029018888560119019179750009020369780415357456UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153574568 a10.4324/9780415357456 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWriting for the Voteh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aWomen's Suffrage Literature is a new Major Work from Routledge and Edition Synapse. It makes available in facsimile key texts which represent the wealth of creative writing that emerged around the issue of women's suffrage in the early twentieth century. The collection includes five significant novels, a wide range of drama and representative short stories. Selected in order to illustrate the diversity of concerns and positions with the campaign for women's suffrage, the texts also reflect the different literary models adopted. They cover a range of key moments within and after the campaign for the vote, revealing changes in perspective and tactics between 1907 and 1924. The selected texts problematize categories such as pro- and anti-suffrage writing, reveal the complex relationship between definitions of a 'feminist' and a 'suffrage' text and raise questions about critical approaches to such politicized writings. The collection is organized so as to provide some historical coverage of this key period; to allow comparative analysis of different genres; and to demonstrate the variety of concerns and discourses which defined this campaign. It has been edited by a team of academics with long experience of researching and teaching in the field of women's suffrage. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aCockin, Katharine,eeditor.1 aNorquay, Glenda,eeditor.1 aPark, Sowon S.,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-suffrage-literature/volumes/writing-for-the-vote aBook01960nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450062002152600034002773000023003115000033003345200932003675380036012996500014013356500030013496500031013796500024014106500022014346500029014567000033014858560095015189750009016139780415320344UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153203448 a10.4324/9780415320344 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen's Travel Writing, 1750-1850h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe Romantic Period saw a massive advance in British colonial expansion, which was accompanied by a corresponding expansion in travel writings. These published letters, journals and books provided British readers with detailed accounts of new and exotic locations and thus engaged the reading public with expansionist enterprises. Covering the period of the French Revolution up until Victoria's ascendancy to the throne, and featuring journeys spanning France and central Europe, India, and South America, this collection brings together some of the most interesting travel accounts written by women at this time. The authors included come from a variety of social backgrounds and their written styles are as varied as their journeys. For instance, Williams and Morgan were professional writers who may be described as 'feminists', while Fay and Falconbridge were ordinary women who had been through extraordinary experiences. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aFranklin, Caroline,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-travel-writing-1750-1850 aBook01980nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450059002152600034002743000023003085000033003315200932003645380036012966500014013326500030013466500031013766500024014076500022014316500029014537000033014828560118015159750009016339780415320405UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153204058 a10.4324/9780415320405 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aItaly, Volume Ih[electronic resource] :bLady Morgan. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe Romantic Period saw a massive advance in British colonial expansion, which was accompanied by a corresponding expansion in travel writings. These published letters, journals and books provided British readers with detailed accounts of new and exotic locations and thus engaged the reading public with expansionist enterprises. Covering the period of the French Revolution up until Victoria's ascendancy to the throne, and featuring journeys spanning France and central Europe, India, and South America, this collection brings together some of the most interesting travel accounts written by women at this time. The authors included come from a variety of social backgrounds and their written styles are as varied as their journeys. For instance, Williams and Morgan were professional writers who may be described as 'feminists', while Fay and Falconbridge were ordinary women who had been through extraordinary experiences. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aFranklin, Caroline,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-travel-writing-1750-1850/volumes/italy-volume-i aBook01982nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450060002152600034002753000023003095000033003325200932003655380036012976500014013336500030013476500031013776500024014086500022014326500029014547000033014838560119015169750009016359780415320412UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153204128 a10.4324/9780415320412 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aItaly, Volume IIh[electronic resource] :bLady Morgan. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe Romantic Period saw a massive advance in British colonial expansion, which was accompanied by a corresponding expansion in travel writings. These published letters, journals and books provided British readers with detailed accounts of new and exotic locations and thus engaged the reading public with expansionist enterprises. Covering the period of the French Revolution up until Victoria's ascendancy to the throne, and featuring journeys spanning France and central Europe, India, and South America, this collection brings together some of the most interesting travel accounts written by women at this time. The authors included come from a variety of social backgrounds and their written styles are as varied as their journeys. For instance, Williams and Morgan were professional writers who may be described as 'feminists', while Fay and Falconbridge were ordinary women who had been through extraordinary experiences. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aFranklin, Caroline,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-travel-writing-1750-1850/volumes/italy-volume-ii aBook01984nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450061002152600034002763000023003105000033003335200932003665380036012986500014013346500030013486500031013786500024014096500022014336500029014557000033014848560120015179750009016379780415320429UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153204298 a10.4324/9780415320429 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aItaly, Volume IIIh[electronic resource] :bLady Morgan. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe Romantic Period saw a massive advance in British colonial expansion, which was accompanied by a corresponding expansion in travel writings. These published letters, journals and books provided British readers with detailed accounts of new and exotic locations and thus engaged the reading public with expansionist enterprises. Covering the period of the French Revolution up until Victoria's ascendancy to the throne, and featuring journeys spanning France and central Europe, India, and South America, this collection brings together some of the most interesting travel accounts written by women at this time. The authors included come from a variety of social backgrounds and their written styles are as varied as their journeys. For instance, Williams and Morgan were professional writers who may be described as 'feminists', while Fay and Falconbridge were ordinary women who had been through extraordinary experiences. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aFranklin, Caroline,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-travel-writing-1750-1850/volumes/italy-volume-iii aBook01998nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450072002152600034002873000023003215000033003445200932003775380036013096500014013456500030013596500031013896500024014206500022014446500029014667000033014958560123015289750009016519780415320351UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153203518 a10.4324/9780415320351 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aLetters From Franceh[electronic resource] :bHelen Maria Williams. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe Romantic Period saw a massive advance in British colonial expansion, which was accompanied by a corresponding expansion in travel writings. These published letters, journals and books provided British readers with detailed accounts of new and exotic locations and thus engaged the reading public with expansionist enterprises. Covering the period of the French Revolution up until Victoria's ascendancy to the throne, and featuring journeys spanning France and central Europe, India, and South America, this collection brings together some of the most interesting travel accounts written by women at this time. The authors included come from a variety of social backgrounds and their written styles are as varied as their journeys. For instance, Williams and Morgan were professional writers who may be described as 'feminists', while Fay and Falconbridge were ordinary women who had been through extraordinary experiences. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aFranklin, Caroline,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-travel-writing-1750-1850/volumes/letters-from-france aBook02000nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450072002152600034002873000023003215000033003445200932003775380036013096500014013456500030013596500031013896500024014206500022014446500029014667000033014958560125015289750009016539780415320368UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153203688 a10.4324/9780415320368 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aLetters from Franceh[electronic resource] :bHelen Maria Williams. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe Romantic Period saw a massive advance in British colonial expansion, which was accompanied by a corresponding expansion in travel writings. These published letters, journals and books provided British readers with detailed accounts of new and exotic locations and thus engaged the reading public with expansionist enterprises. Covering the period of the French Revolution up until Victoria's ascendancy to the throne, and featuring journeys spanning France and central Europe, India, and South America, this collection brings together some of the most interesting travel accounts written by women at this time. The authors included come from a variety of social backgrounds and their written styles are as varied as their journeys. For instance, Williams and Morgan were professional writers who may be described as 'feminists', while Fay and Falconbridge were ordinary women who had been through extraordinary experiences. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aFranklin, Caroline,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-travel-writing-1750-1850/volumes/letters-from-france-1 aBook02126nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450134002152600034003493000023003835000033004065200932004395380036013716500014014076500030014216500031014516500024014826500022015066500029015287000033015578560189015909750009017799780415320399UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153203998 a10.4324/9780415320399 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aLetters from the Island of Teneriffe, Brazil, the Cape of Good Hope and the East Indiesh[electronic resource] :bMrs Kindersley. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe Romantic Period saw a massive advance in British colonial expansion, which was accompanied by a corresponding expansion in travel writings. These published letters, journals and books provided British readers with detailed accounts of new and exotic locations and thus engaged the reading public with expansionist enterprises. Covering the period of the French Revolution up until Victoria's ascendancy to the throne, and featuring journeys spanning France and central Europe, India, and South America, this collection brings together some of the most interesting travel accounts written by women at this time. The authors included come from a variety of social backgrounds and their written styles are as varied as their journeys. For instance, Williams and Morgan were professional writers who may be described as 'feminists', while Fay and Falconbridge were ordinary women who had been through extraordinary experiences. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aFranklin, Caroline,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-travel-writing-1750-1850/volumes/letters-from-the-island-of-teneriffe-brazil-the-cape-of-good-hope-and-the-east-indies aBook02267nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450225002152600034004403000023004745000033004975200932005305380036014626500014014986500030015126500031015426500024015736500022015976500029016197000033016488560239016819750009019209780415320375UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153203758 a10.4324/9780415320375 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aNarrative of Two Voyages to the River Sierra Leone & History of a Six Weeks' Tour Through a Part of France, Switzerland, Germany, and Hollandh[electronic resource] :bA. M. Falconbridge & Mary Shelley and Percy Shelley. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe Romantic Period saw a massive advance in British colonial expansion, which was accompanied by a corresponding expansion in travel writings. These published letters, journals and books provided British readers with detailed accounts of new and exotic locations and thus engaged the reading public with expansionist enterprises. Covering the period of the French Revolution up until Victoria's ascendancy to the throne, and featuring journeys spanning France and central Europe, India, and South America, this collection brings together some of the most interesting travel accounts written by women at this time. The authors included come from a variety of social backgrounds and their written styles are as varied as their journeys. For instance, Williams and Morgan were professional writers who may be described as 'feminists', while Fay and Falconbridge were ordinary women who had been through extraordinary experiences. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aFranklin, Caroline,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-travel-writing-1750-1850/volumes/narrative-of-two-voyages-to-the-river-sierra-leone-history-of-a-six-weeks-tour-through-a-part-of-france-switzerland-germany-and-holland aBook02052nam a2200349Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450077002152600034002923000023003265000033003495200932003825380036013146500014013506500030013646500031013946500024014256500022014496500029014717000033015007000029015338560131015629750009016939780415320382UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97804153203828 a10.4324/9780415320382 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aOriginal Letters from Indiah[electronic resource] :bMrs Elizabeth Fay. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aThe Romantic Period saw a massive advance in British colonial expansion, which was accompanied by a corresponding expansion in travel writings. These published letters, journals and books provided British readers with detailed accounts of new and exotic locations and thus engaged the reading public with expansionist enterprises. Covering the period of the French Revolution up until Victoria's ascendancy to the throne, and featuring journeys spanning France and central Europe, India, and South America, this collection brings together some of the most interesting travel accounts written by women at this time. The authors included come from a variety of social backgrounds and their written styles are as varied as their journeys. For instance, Williams and Morgan were professional writers who may be described as 'feminists', while Fay and Falconbridge were ordinary women who had been through extraordinary experiences. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aFranklin, Caroline,eeditor.1 aFay, Elizabeth,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-travel-writing-1750-1850/volumes/original-letters-from-india aBook01391nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450071002152600034002863000023003205000033003435200354003765380036007306500014007666500030007806500031008106500024008416500022008656500029008877000026009168560102009429750009010449781848935228UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97818489352288 a10.4324/9781848935228 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aWomen's University Narratives, 1890 - 1945h[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFrom the late nineteenth century women began to enter British universities. Their numbers were small and their gains hard won and fiercely contested, yet they inspired a whole new genre of fiction. This collection of largely forgotten and rare texts forms a valuable primary resource for scholars of literature, social history and women's education. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aBogen, Anna,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-university-narratives-1890-1945 aBook01386nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450043002152600034002583000023002925000033003155200354003485380036007026500014007386500030007526500031007826500024008136500022008376500029008597000026008888560125009149750009010399781138766815UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387668158 a10.4324/9781138766815 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aA College Girlh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFrom the late nineteenth century women began to enter British universities. Their numbers were small and their gains hard won and fiercely contested, yet they inspired a whole new genre of fiction. This collection of largely forgotten and rare texts forms a valuable primary resource for scholars of literature, social history and women's education. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aBogen, Anna,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-university-narratives-1890-1945/volumes/a-college-girl aBook01394nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450047002152600034002623000023002965000033003195200354003525380036007066500014007426500030007566500031007866500024008176500022008416500029008637000026008928560129009189750009010479781138766792UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387667928 a10.4324/9781138766792 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aIn Statu Pupillarih[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFrom the late nineteenth century women began to enter British universities. Their numbers were small and their gains hard won and fiercely contested, yet they inspired a whole new genre of fiction. This collection of largely forgotten and rare texts forms a valuable primary resource for scholars of literature, social history and women's education. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aBogen, Anna,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-university-narratives-1890-1945/volumes/in-statu-pupillari aBook01412nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450056002152600034002713000023003055000033003285200354003615380036007156500014007516500030007656500031007956500024008266500022008506500029008727000026009018560138009279750009010659781138766808UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387668088 a10.4324/9781138766808 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Girls of Merton Collegeh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFrom the late nineteenth century women began to enter British universities. Their numbers were small and their gains hard won and fiercely contested, yet they inspired a whole new genre of fiction. This collection of largely forgotten and rare texts forms a valuable primary resource for scholars of literature, social history and women's education. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aBogen, Anna,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-university-narratives-1890-1945/volumes/the-girls-of-merton-college aBook01376nam a2200337Ia 45000010014000000030008000140050017000220060019000390070015000580080041000730200018001140240026001320400021001580500017001790820019001962450038002152600034002533000023002875000033003105200354003435380036006976500014007336500030007476500031007776500024008086500022008326500029008547000026008838560120009099750009010299781138766822UtOrBLW20161017145852.0m o u cr unu---uuuuu161017s2016 enk o u 000 0 eng d a97811387668228 a10.4324/9781138766822 aFlBoTFGcFlBoTFG 4aHQ1154b.H5704a305.42bH6736900aThe Pearlh[electronic resource]. a[London] :bRoutledge,c2016. a1 online resource. aTitle supplied by publisher. aFrom the late nineteenth century women began to enter British universities. Their numbers were small and their gains hard won and fiercely contested, yet they inspired a whole new genre of fiction. This collection of largely forgotten and rare texts forms a valuable primary resource for scholars of literature, social history and women's education. aMode of access: World Wide Web. 0aFeminism. 0aWomenxSocial Conditions. 0aWomenxPolitical Activity. 0aWomen and Religion. 0aWomenxEducation. 0aFeminism and literature.1 aBogen, Anna,eeditor.40uhttps://www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism/sets/womens-university-narratives-1890-1945/volumes/the-pearl aBook